#1
Hello UG.

I recently got myself a brand new Agile 2000, as my friend got one and it impressed me, so I figured Id give it a go.
I've encountered a problem I've never seen in my 5 years of playing. Anytime I tune the strings to pitch, they all end up going sharp. And if I just tune one string while the rest have been "tuned", the rest of the strings go sharp. And it does this every time I tune it regardless of what string I tune.
A good example would be simply tuning to drop D throws the rest of the strings completely outta whack.
I've worked the slack outta the strings as much as possible, and no matter what I do this still happens.
I've googled and searchbard to no avail.
It's driving me insane, and I would really appreciate some help on this.
I AGREE
#3
That's normal on guitars that have a thin, weaker neck, with heavy gauge strings, detensioning the strings relives pressure on the neck, thus pulling on the other strings more.

You just have to find a balance and retune if you change any tunings.
#6
The first thing I'd check is your nut. Could be that the slots are too tight or are otherwise not allowing the string to pass through smoothly when tuning up. This would result in the string tension between the nut and tuner to be more than nut to bridge, and as you play it it will move, allowing the tension to equalize and the string goes sharp.

Are you finding this with all strings? The problem I'm stating above is most common with the G and D strings on a 3x3 guitar, because the string takes quite a bend at the nut and can easily get hung up.

If the strings are tight in the slots, get a set of torch tip cleaners at your local hardware store. These are tiny wire files, cost about $3. Find one the size of your string (ever so slightly larger) and make a few passes to widen it and remove any rough areas that might cause your string to bind. Then put some lube in the slot... graphite (pencil lead) or chapstick both work fine.
#7
Quote by ethan_hanus
That's normal on guitars that have a thin, weaker neck, with heavy gauge strings, detensioning the strings relives pressure on the neck, thus pulling on the other strings more.

You just have to find a balance and retune if you change any tunings.


weak neck??? i thought the UG consensus was that agiles were better than gibson!
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#8
Quote by mike_oxbig
weak neck??? i thought the UG consensus was that agiles were better than gibson!

Weak neck doesnt mean crappy neck, its just that the neck on a Agile is thinner than a gibson meaning it has more flex to it.
#9
Quote by Pac_man0123
Is it one with a floating bridge?


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#10
Quote by Pac_man0123
Is it one with a floating bridge?



You mean with a Floyd Rose trem? A floating bridge is what full hollow-bodies have... AL-2000s don't have floating bridges.

With any trem equipped guitar, and to a lesser extent any guitar, you will have to make several passes to get all the strings in tune, because, as DarkD said, changing the tension on one string will affect all the others. Normally though when you increase the tension of one (tune up) the others go flat, not sharp.

I really don't think it has to do with a thin or weak neck though. They don't have thinner necks than Gibsons. AL-2000 necks are quite chunky, about like my Les Paul. My 335 has a thinner neck than any of the Agiles I've owned, and it doesn't have that problem. And the 335 neck has more flex than a Les Paul style because it meets the body at the 19th fret rather than the 16th.

The truss rod suggestion seems a little unlikely as well. If it were loose, under string tension, the neck would be drawn up (positive relief), causing the strings to go flat, not sharp. Now if the AL has a two-way truss rod, it might be possible that it is tightened too much. Tightening the strings temporarily draws the neck up (positive relief), but gradually the tension from the truss rod draws it down again, causing the strings to go sharp. If you are not experienced with doing truss rod adjustments, I'd be real careful about cranking around on it.