#1
I just bought a martin DRS2 and i was reading the care guide it came with and it says to get a bunch of stuff and monitor the humidity very frequently..is it really that important?
ESP LTD EC-1000 vintage black
sunburst fender MIM tele
Epiphone LP standard ebony
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Mesa/Boogie .50 caliber plus head
Marshall JCM900 Hi-gain MII 2500
Fender Hot rod Deluxe
#3
It really depends on who you ask, if you want to treat your insturment like a collectors item, and you want to preserve it in the best condition possible over the course of the next couple decades - then yes it is a big deal.

If your planning on using your guitar frequently, like if your using it at gigs, taking it to school, drinking and smoking with your friends and having a jam more than a couple times a week - then no.

Acoustic guitars are a bit more fragile than electric guitars, but they still hold up pretty well over time without a bunch of maintenance. Extreme hot or cold weather will certainly affect the playability and the sound of your instrument - but shit happens, it will likely still perform in a satisfactory manner.
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#4
Quote by Vypor
It really depends on who you ask, if you want to treat your insturment like a collectors item, and you want to preserve it in the best condition possible over the course of the next couple decades - then yes it is a big deal.

If your planning on using your guitar frequently, like if your using it at gigs, taking it to school, drinking and smoking with your friends and having a jam more than a couple times a week - then no.

Acoustic guitars are a bit more fragile than electric guitars, but they still hold up pretty well over time without a bunch of maintenance. Extreme hot or cold weather will certainly affect the playability and the sound of your instrument - but shit happens, it will likely still perform in a satisfactory manner.

I want to gig and play with it a lot, but i want it to sound as good as possible, what would you do to preserve its state?
ESP LTD EC-1000 vintage black
sunburst fender MIM tele
Epiphone LP standard ebony
Mesa/boogie dual rectifier
Mesa/Boogie .50 caliber plus head
Marshall JCM900 Hi-gain MII 2500
Fender Hot rod Deluxe
#5
I personally tend to get a much more emotional vibe out of an instrument that's ever so slightly out of tune that you don't really notice it, and also has been through a lot. Probably because the musicians playing them are more attached to them and play better because of that.
#6
nah, don't worry about it, warps and cracks add character, right?
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Capitalization is the difference between "I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse" and "i helped my uncle jack off the horse"
Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#7
Quote by Vypor
It really depends on who you ask, if you want to treat your insturment like a collectors item, and you want to preserve it in the best condition possible over the course of the next couple decades - then yes it is a big deal.

If your planning on using your guitar frequently, like if your using it at gigs, taking it to school, drinking and smoking with your friends and having a jam more than a couple times a week - then no.


Acoustic guitars are a bit more fragile than electric guitars, but they still hold up pretty well over time without a bunch of maintenance. Extreme hot or cold weather will certainly affect the playability and the sound of your instrument - but shit happens, it will likely still perform in a satisfactory manner.


I'm sorry, but this is just plain wrong. If you're taking the guitar out for even more use, humidity is even MORE of an issue than if you kept it in its case forever.

TS, let me ask you this. You most likely spent around $800 on your solid wood guitar (assuming you bought it new). Do you really want to pay $200 to fix a structural crack on your guitar? Paying roughly 1/4th your guitar's cost all over again when you could prevent a crack with a $20 humidifier?
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#8
^ you'd be robbing him of his emotional attachment - if you roll your guitar down a hill and play it out of tune you'll magically be able to play it better! didn't you learn anything from this thread???
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Capitalization is the difference between "I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse" and "i helped my uncle jack off the horse"
Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#9
Since acoustic guitars are for the mostly made from very thin wood held together with glue and then take into account the amount of pressure exerted by the strings (a set of extra lights places about 125 lbs. of force at the neck joint and much more at the bridge), subjecting a guitar to low or to high humidity extremes for long periods will eventually cause problems and/ or structural damage.

Some people don't worry about it too much and others are quite fastidious about it. I treat even my little el ultras cheapos with care, but thats just me.
I'm the only player to be sponsered by 7 guitar companies not to use their products.
#10
I'm gonna say if you're using a central heating system, (especially hot air), and it doesn't have a humidifier in the duct work, then some kind of case humidifier is mandatory in the Winter. Probably not for the rest of the year, unless of course you live in an arid area such as Arizona, and points near there.

If you do take your guitar out frequently in all kinds of weather, then one of the molded, sealed, foam cored cases is for you. These mitigate rapid changes in temperature and humidity, which could be disastrous.

Don't confuse "luck" with the law of averages. There is quite a lag between what the weather is doing, and when your guitar catches up with it.

Moral of the story, one day the RH is0%, next day the RH is 100%, 4 days later the guitar averages it out to 50%, which is pretty close to right on the money.

The length of time required to bring wood to a workable state, even in a controlled environment, would tend to bear my previous statement out.
#11
You should just give me your guitars - all of them.

I live in Monterey, CA where the relative humidity is just about perfect year-round, and my guitar room is set-up is for any and all extra thermoregulatory needs.

You don't need the stress and responsibility of caring for your instrument - and seriously, EVERYONE plays the guitar.

Two words brother: Air Guitar.

Spill.
#12
Quote by spillproof
You should just give me your guitars - all of them.

I live in Monterey, CA where the relative humidity is just about perfect year-round, and my guitar room is set-up is for any and all extra thermoregulatory needs.

You don't need the stress and responsibility of caring for your instrument - and seriously, EVERYONE plays the guitar.

Two words brother: Air Guitar.

Spill.


Umm... How is this helpful in any way? If you have nothing helpful to post, then please don't.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#13
Quote by warriorde52
Yes. You can even notice it in the tuning.

On another forum, someone posted that laminate guitars first appeared at the top end of the market, as an innovation to make the sound of guitars more constant, regardless of the weather conditions.
#14
The fellow that does the excellent Frets.Com site is a professional repairman who's been in business for about 30 years.
He says the biggest enemies of an acoustic guitar are heat and dryness.

Excessive humidity may cause a little swelling... But heat and dry will cause cracks and other structural damage.
So... If you live in a hot, dry area, or if you're constantly travelling with your instrument in such conditions (like, locked in a car or trailer), you need to take precautions.
Here in Missouri, the ambient humidity is pretty high. The danger comes during the Winter, when everyone has the heat up and no humidifiers, and in the heat of Summer, when everyone is running equally-dry air conditioning.
You can buy a hygrometer pretty cheaply to monitor the humidity in your home... And a decent humidifier can be made for pennies.
#15
Quote by Bikewer
The fellow that does the excellent Frets.Com site is a professional repairman who's been in business for about 30 years.
He says the biggest enemies of an acoustic guitar are heat and dryness.

Excessive humidity may cause a little swelling... But heat and dry will cause cracks and other structural damage.
So... If you live in a hot, dry area, or if you're constantly travelling with your instrument in such conditions (like, locked in a car or trailer), you need to take precautions.
Here in Missouri, the ambient humidity is pretty high. The danger comes during the Winter, when everyone has the heat up and no humidifiers, and in the heat of Summer, when everyone is running equally-dry air conditioning.
You can buy a hygrometer pretty cheaply to monitor the humidity in your home... And a decent humidifier can be made for pennies.

i bought one today and my humidity in my room where i keep my guitars is between 40 and 50 % it goes up in down through the day. Martin guitars says to keep it between 40 and 60 so i think i am good till the winter.
ESP LTD EC-1000 vintage black
sunburst fender MIM tele
Epiphone LP standard ebony
Mesa/boogie dual rectifier
Mesa/Boogie .50 caliber plus head
Marshall JCM900 Hi-gain MII 2500
Fender Hot rod Deluxe
#16
too much humidity causes swelling, which can lead to braces detaching and the bridge lifting, not to mention making your guitar sound crappy. too much dryness causes cracking. keeping your guitar between 40% and 50 or 55% will let it sound its best, but anywhere up to 65% should be fine for wood health.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#17
This thread came just at the right time for me. I've recently moved to a new apartment. The new place has a humidifier in the furnace system, so I think I'll be fine over the winter months (I live in Chicago) but the basement severely needed a dehumidifier, as it felt a bit damp and very cool. I bought one yesterday and have been running it all day and got it down to about 45-50% in the basement. I brought my guitar from my parents house where I'm not sure what the humidity was, but ever since it started warming up outside it's been singing like a bird at their place. I took out my guitar at my new place last night and there was a lot of buzzing going on and I was getting really annoyed. I presume this is from the difference in humidity from place to place, and I've read some guitars are more susceptible to changing in different environments than others. Is this something that will fix itself over time and just needs to get used to it's new environment, or is it something that I may have to adjust myself or a shop...?