#2
Quote by Apollo 13
I've been looking at this, does anyone have any experience with Prism?

http://www.millennium-music.co.uk/prismsound-orpheus-firewire-interface

If you can afford it, it is definitely one of the best available - used one a while back and they really are incredibly deailed. The only thing I would suggest, is that if you are willing to spend that kind of money, trial a few others (Apogee Symphony I/O and the Lynx Aurora are the other two 'big hitters' that spring to mind) and if you can't hear the differences between them then you shouldn't be spending that much on one piece of gear yet (not saying the differences are big by any means, but there are differences in the amount of colouration and the noise floors, so you should definitely be at the top of your game if you're gonna sink so much money on just the I/O of your setup!
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#3
I have £15000 to spend on gear my studio, can you recommend anything else to get me started? I've already got a compressor and a multi-effects.
#4
Woo, Chris and Matrix should get here quick - we have stuff to recommend with a nice, fat budget Anyway, what comp have you bought? And when you say multi-effects, are you on about a TC Electronics or Lexicon rack unit, or something more guitar-based?


I'd say that with a budget that big, you might as well look into more inputs than the 8-input Orpheus. Using the 16-channel Lynx Aurora (the model I'm more familiar with) you could get yourself some nice mic pre's and still have budget left for some mics, bit of outboard and the more mundane stuff like cables, patchbays and mic stands etc.

For £15k you could get something like this:

£2,800k Lynx Aurora 16 (16-channel A/D converters)
£2k Focusrite ISA 828 (8-channel mic pre)
£2,350 API 3124+ (4-channel mic pre/4-channel DI)
£1,850 Neve 1073DPA (2-channel mic pre)
£1,500 R. Neve Designs Portico 5012-Duo (2-channel mic pre)


All that adds up to £10,500-ish, and that would get you a world-class setup - you could save money buying cheaper pre's or buying fewer separate units, but I suggested that as it gives you a lot of variation depending on the sound you're after (plus 8 near-identical inputs if you want a lot of similar channels... drums for example). If you plan on buying plenty of outboard or mics, maybe lay off on the Neve and API stuff, and get two 8-channel ISA's instead... very hard to beat for the money, and sound great on drums and vocals!

Then the rest would be up to you... if I was allowed one hardware compressor and only one, it would be the Empirical Labs EL-8 Distressor for sure, but you say you have already chosen one.

For mics, you could get a Neumann U87 (the newer, reissue though) as a stand-out vocal mic and great all-rounder, and then compliment it with a nice stereo pair (AKG C414s perhaps), then a Shure SM7B for growlier vocals and maybe three Sennheiser MD421's (my fav. mic on toms)... after that, the rest of the popular mics are all much cheaper (SM57s, Sennheiser e906's etc.).


Also, if you bought a lot of the stuff from one retailer, and spoke to them on the phone/in-store, I'm sure they'd do you a nice discount on some of the stuff as you're spending a considerable amount with them and are buying pro-level gear.

Oh, and bear in mind you had better have a good machine to run all this gear with, and the right connections to use the gear, or it is still as useless as when it's sitting in a showroom - yeah, while I come back down to Earth and out of dreamland, maybe we should know your current setup?
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Mar 25, 2012,
#6
What do you want your studio to do? You certainly have a respectable budget, but it can be stretched in different ways, and depending on what you want to do, it will dictate what direction you take with it.

Consider:
- Do you want to record live bands with live drums off the floor?
- Do you want it to be portable?
- Will it be mostly acoustic/electric instruments, or electronic?
- Do you need to make any changes to your physical environment (ie. iso booths, acoustic treatment, sound-proofing, furniture, etc.)? This could eat up your entire budget even before you get started, so be modest about your wish list here.
- What do you have now? (computer, audio monitors, mics, stands, software, etc.)

The DBX compressor and the Zoom thingy will probably take a back seat to anything else you get.

Also consider, given a choice between an elite interface with elite preamps or elite microphones, I'd go with the elite microphones.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
The £15000 would not include the sound proofing and boothing. and the studio would be permanent and suited towards recording bands, acoustic and electric stuff.
#8
F**k me... that's almost $25K Canadian.

I have no specific plan here, so I'm just going to start typing:

Mics:

Neumann U87 (every pro-ish studio should have one) $3500, but get two so you can do a singer/guitarist with both of them in figure-8 mode = $7000
*LD condensor great for vox, acoustic instruments, etc.
Royer R-121 - get two of these $1250x2 = $2500
*ribbon mics great for drum overheads, acoustic instruments and are even great vocal mics
Neumann KM184 (get two of these $850x2) = $1700
*small diaphragm condensors, more neutral than larger diaphragms or ribbons, also great for overheads or acoustic instruments, especially spot-miking. Cheaper alternatives to these would be the Rode NT5's)
Shure SM7-B = $400
*LD dynamic mic - great for vocals, also lower-frequency instruments like bass, kick, etc. The lead vocals on the Thriller album were done with an SM7)
Sennheiser e906 (get two of these $200x2) = $400
*dynamic mics built especially with guitar cabs in mind, also good on toms.
Sennheiser MD421 (get two of these $400x2) = $800
* Great all-purpose mics, very beefy on guitar cabs, toms, and even has uses on kick and vocals.
Electro-Voice RE-20 - $400
another great choice for kick, bass, and even some vocals - a good complement to the SM7 and the MD421
Shure SM57 (get two of these $100x2) = $200
* like a good screwdriver, or a potato masher, you'll always be glad you have one.

Cables, stands, clips, pop shield, etc. = $500

Total mic budget = $13 900

Notes:

1. For a second figure-8 mic, instead of the second U87, also consider an AT4060, Neumann TLM103 or a AKG C414 for this, or even a Rode K2.
2. Other brands to consider: Shoepps, Josephson, AEA, Earthworks, etc.
3. If you've got an extra $8000 lying around, consider a Sony C-800G...

Monitors - Adam Audio A7X = $1400/pr

Front end:

Universal Audio Apollo Duo interface $2000
Biggest limitation is that it only has four XLR inputs, though has many other I/O options. Also comes bundled with UAD plugins from Universal Audio like the 1176LN, LA2A, and Pultech EQ.

API 3124+ sounds like a good option for four more preamps = $2550
Avalon AD2022 would give two more stunning preamps = $3000

Total Front End = $7550

Notes: You really can't go wrong with any of the following brands: Neve, Avalon, SSL, Trident, API, Lynx, Apogee

Waves Platinum bundle = $1000
Cubase 6 = $500


Total = $24 000
=15 043 GBP

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
If you can find a way to scrimp here ^ , be sure to get a headphone distribution amp and a few pairs of headphones.

Also, some other good tools to get would be:

Tech 21 Sans Amp - fantastic for bass DI
Radial DI boxes, etc.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Thanks guys, can anyone reccomend a college in the uk that offers music tech courses or has very good music facilities? I've already been doing music tech at my upper school and it's been going really well, but there sixth form dosent offer that many facilities. Also, what's he best place to learn a few extra tips.
#11
Quote by Apollo 13
Thanks guys, can anyone reccomend a college in the uk that offers music tech courses or has very good music facilities? I've already been doing music tech at my upper school and it's been going really well, but there sixth form dosent offer that many facilities. Also, what's he best place to learn a few extra tips.
Whereabouts are you living?

Personally if you've got the cash to set up your own studio, qualifications are irrelevant. Practice, practice, practice.

There's SAE, but I wouldn't recommend it that highly - my mate did a course at the one in Liverpool and the facilities were great but he was underwhelmed for the price. You're also basically paying for a MacBook, which is total crap if you're not an Apple fan.


Give us a rundown of where you are, what you're aiming to do etc!
#12
About music production and engineering....

My answer from another thread on the same question....

First, there are studios closing down daily because the market is just not there anymore to support many of them. Your potential number of employers is dwindling all the time, and those people who had jobs at those studios (and therefore experience) will be competing with you looking for work at the handful that are still standing.

Second, most real-world studios don't care that much if you have qualifications on paper. They look at what your track record is. What have you done? Can I hear your work? That sort of thing. Someone whose work speaks for itself without training will get the job pretty much every time over someone whose work is okay who has training.

By extension of both of those, most studios don't put out ads "wanted: studio engineer." They take advantage of their existing set of contacts and connections and fish from that pond. It is very much a business of who you know.

So.... given all that, the best way of getting a job at a major studio is:
1. Show up at their door and introduce yourself. Do this many times if necessary. Be a polite, cordial, eager and pleasant pain in the ass. You're not there for a job yet. You're volunteering to make coffee, vacuum carpets, be a gopher when someone in a band needs smokes, water plants, whatever. In return, all you ask is for the chance to watch a few sessions so you can start learning some stuff.
2. Once your foot is in the door, be the best coffee maker, carpet vacuumer, corner-store runner you can. It shows you're worth the effort for them to have you around. They'll start to like you and be more willing to let you watch. They'll even teach you the proper way to wind cables.
3. Eventually, you'll be given jobs like setting up mics and moving them around the room as the engineer tells you what to do - "closer... closer.... back it off a bit... now left... "

Little jobs at a time, and you'll be trained on site by the people who know what they are doing. It won't cost you anything but time.

As they get confidence in your knowledge, reliability, etc., there will come a time when the studio makes some concession to band where they'll give them a cut rate if they're willing to come in at 6:00am and work with one of their interns. That would be you. Maybe it will come up as one of the regular studio assistants is sick, or quits, or whatever, and you'll get called up to help out. Sure, you're last picked, but at least you're picked.

You'll start noticing that other people with genuine credentials are sending in their resumees. The studio, already with a full complement of staff, including interns, assistants, lackeys, etc. does not typically call those applicants back.

CT

PS. Just in case you're thinking that I'm one of those "anti-education.... school is no good for anything" kind of people, I have a degree in music and teach in a school... so no. I'm *very* pro-education. I'm also very practical, and that means taking the steps you *really* need to get there rather than assuming that a piece of paper will be your ticket.


Now YOUR best bet would be to get an internship at major studio. If you have high end gear and can talk about your Neve or Avalon and API preamps and your U87 and even have half of an inkling of the beauties of a Royer mic, they'll probably be interested in some free help - especially if you have taken some time to learn how to use them a little yourself.

Then you take that learning and apply it to your own studio.

Because in the end, if you have the gear and know how to use it, nobody is going to give half of a damn whether you have a piece of paper to prove it. Just imagine someone calling up Bob Rock to work on their album....

"Hey man, I would SOOOOO love to work with you to record our album. I have so many albums that sound fantastic that you have recorded. It would really be a thrill."

"Sweet, dude. I'm looking forward to it too."

"Great! By the way... where did you study?"

"I didn't. I just learned. Experience, man, for the win!"

"Oh..."

*protracted silence*

"Is there something wrong."

"Aw, man, idunno... we were kinda hoping to have a guy who has a diploma in this sort of thing. Thanks, anyways, though...."

*click*



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.