#1
I have to play this tune this Thursday in a show and thought I should learn some of it properly as opposed to just blowing over it. So I put this bit together. Have at it...

Here's the original recording...http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=30FTr6G53VU

What I charted is the head and the first solo.

Usually I'd play the head in one spot on the fretboard but timbre wise it's sounds better moving it and keeping in on the same strings. Plus it's shows the symmetry for melody.

The positions I choose for the solo lines are based purely on timbre again as well as trying to keep it all in one spot on the fretboard to show how nicely the lines intertwine as the chords change. In the end though, those strings and those frets seem to have the truest sound (to me anyways) for copping the timbre and sound of the tenor sax.

You can download the PDF (better viewing) as well as the GP6 file (so you can manipulate it):

PDF: http://test.mikedodge.com/mvdmusic/miked/giantsteps.pdf
GPx: http://test.mikedodge.com/mvdmusic/miked/giantsteps.gpx

Here's the chart in a page view...





Knock yourself out!!!
Last edited by MikeDodge at Mar 25, 2012,
#2
The giant steps solo is a perfect example of how dissonances are used in a melody. Everything Coltrane plays in this solo is either

a) A chord tone
b) A passing note
c) A chromatic passing note
d) An appoggiatura
e) A cambiata
f) A changing note

Good job on the transcription Mike.
#4
I have to admit, that so much of that lead has always sounded like "noise" to me, albeit cool "noise". Years ago I saw a Transcript of the song in a Guitar Mag (can't recall which" But I remember thinking that people that learned the solo would probably have no idea of where it came from - it would be mere repetition, while those who understood the solo, and idea behind the progression, probably wouldn't need the transcription TABBED out to begin with!

To me this marked the juxtaposition between playing and understanding...it was one of many places where it seemed far better to know what was going on than attempt to parrot it.

Best,

Sean
#5
Sean, I don't understand your point.
Are you saying transcribing serves no point because the people who need the transcription wouldn't understand where it's coming from and those who understand where it's coming from don't need the transcription?

I mean transcribing is a great tool for all musicians, especially jazz. Many jazz artists of decades past learned jazz strictly through recordings, copping the styles of their favorite players, learning every note they played on the album solely through listening to it.

Anyway OP, that must have been a fun job to do. I hate playing that tune. It's just a bad tune, imo. But have fun with it I guess xD
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#6
Quote by King Of Suede
Sean, I don't understand your point.
Are you saying transcribing serves no point because the people who need the transcription wouldn't understand where it's coming from and those who understand where it's coming from don't need the transcription?

I mean transcribing is a great tool for all musicians, especially jazz. Many jazz artists of decades past learned jazz strictly through recordings, copping the styles of their favorite players, learning every note they played on the album solely through listening to it.

Anyway OP, that must have been a fun job to do. I hate playing that tune. It's just a bad tune, imo. But have fun with it I guess xD


I'm talking about those who "learn" the solo by simply copying it from a transcription in a Magazine, as opposed to those who learn it by transcribing it themselves, and/or understanding the basis for the tune, the progression and how the artist approached the solo to start with.

Best,

Sean
#7
I can play over it fairly decent. I thought it would be worth the time to pick it out.

Not sure about the "noise" comment though, that first solo is nothing but chord tones. He's not "going out" at all. He hardly even plays any V7alt tones except for the straight/classic bebop licks in measure 21 over the IIm-V (Am7-D7). In most cases it's even straight triads or extended (4-note) arps.

I can blow over it at almost full speed but trying to play his solo at full speed is a task!!! I'm up to measure 24 for memorization and speed. The next section seems more difficult. I may need to move the notes around on the fretboard some to play it at speed. Although, where I placed the notes for the chart sound as close to the original "sound" as I could get (to me anyways).
#8
This is pretty cool. If you'd like, I could put this into pure notation which might help some people read it better.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#9
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This is pretty cool. If you'd like, I could put this into pure notation which might help some people read it better.


I can do that too with a click of a button. I need to fix up some of the enharmonic stuff too before releasing it as just notation. I didn't pay attention when guitar pro named # notes over the b chords.

I realized I missed some chord names Damn, just when I thought I was done with it I'll repost when I get a chance to fix it.
#10
thanks mike..great post...my take...

i take the first five notes and chords..this reveals the essence of the piece..there are the three key centers..B Eb G..the opening arpeggio GMA7 followed by a Bb note which changes the chord quality to minor...i play this five note sequence(7 5 3 1 b3) for each chord G then Eb then B..and play them on each string set in all inversions..then vary the note sequence (b3 3 5 7 1) etc..in all keys..this will take some time to digest..but you are also absorbing a form of symmetric harmony along with this tune..the interval of a major 3rd between chords is what give this piece its unique flavor..when you become comfortable with finding any note sequence in any position for these chords..adding the remaing chords (the ii7 V7) etc become new revelations in "connecting " chords..the possibilities are only limited to your ability to see/hear beyond the next measure..the chord qualities "blur" in this kind of piece..at the tempo that trane played..he was coming "behind" the progression not just keeping up with it..

play well

wolf