#1
Hi
I bought some 20 bucks mandolin a few weeks ago because I wanted to have something to practise my finishing skills on.
So what I want to do with it is give it a new finish (duh!)
I have sanded it down to the wood, which is probably a cheap sprucey kind of wood.
This is a picture of the mandolin:



I want it to be the same colour as this guitar:
http://www.musicstore.de/de_DE/EUR/Gitarren/4/4-Konzertgitarren/Almansa-Studium-Line-Modell-401-Cedar-massive-Zederndecke/art-GIT0003922-000

I want the colour to be darker, but I still want the grain of the original wood to be visible.

I also want to put a figure on the top, so do I need to paint that before I change the wood color or after?
I want the figure to stand out against the darker wood.

Now...
How do I start? I'm a complete noob to woodwork so any help is appreciated.
thanks
Karel
Last edited by Karel Juwet at Mar 26, 2012,
#4
Minwax stains. Let it completely dry then Laquer it, Nitrocellulose based clear coat.

Cheap option
http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2004174/8794/DEFT-Clear-Wood-Finish-Gloss-12-oz-Aerosol.aspx

Better choice
http://reranchstore.stores.yahoo.net/nitclearcoat.html

3 passes a coat, 3 coats a day, 3 hours between coats, light sanding the next morning. Anywhere from 15-25 coats. Let it cure for 2 weeks. Wet sand from 600-1500, then final polishing with a compound.

http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Finishing_supplies/Abrasives,_polishes,_buffers/ColorTone_Polishing_Compounds.html

good luck!
#6
You have to use stain.You apply it then wipe off any excess.Let it dry.Start off lighter than the color you annt because you can always go darker,and the wood alreadt has some color.If you stripped the back,,start there,unless you can find a test spot.Maybe in the soundhole.You can use a finish,satin,gloss,whatever,on the last coat,or just oil it.Like teakwood.Since you only got twenty bucks in it it's kinda a neat skill to learn.Good luck.panhead If the figure you want on it is oil-based,paint the figure first,it won't absorb the stain.If it will absorb the stain do it last before you apply a clear coat,Nitrocellulose,acrylic lacquer,whatever.Then your figure is protected by the clearcoat
Last edited by panhead201 at Mar 26, 2012,
#7
I'm gonna try staining the back first, so that I can learn the basics before I do the top.
Thanks for the info already, panhead, x-plorer88 and Luckylu.
#8
Yeah,it's a lotta fun and you feel like its yours after you're done.I paint cars and motorcycles,I lust have too much tied up in my guitars too fool with them.I like the original finishes and I don't kill the re-sale value.Good Luck,Have Fun.panhead
#9
once you go black, you don't go back

/thread

first time that's applicable actually

stain it. if you want the fretboard darker, lemon oil that bitch
Call me Chris
Quote by jimihendrix6699
had a blast until the person in front of me whipped out his dick and started pissing all over the floor..

Ducks and guitars or fish and guitars. I lead a simple existence
#10
The term laquer is nitrocellulose. So there is no such thing as acrylic laquer.

Nitro is the most forgiving to work with and easiest to apply IMO. It also produces the thinnest finishes and thats good to keep the resonance. That's not to say that urethane, polyurethane, polyester, acrylic or any other type of finish isn't doable either. Although seeing as most stains are oil based, I wouldn't use waterbased acrylic clear. Deft is cheap and it's worked well for me.
#11
PS,I just looked at the color you wanted.That guitar has a solid cedar top,very unusual,most are spruce.Your mandolin looks like spruce,so you might start with a cedar stain.Let us know how it turns out.
#13
I don't want to add figure, I want to add A figure, like a drawing or something. (english isn't my native language, sorry if I messed that up)
I'll keep this thread updated with pictures as I move along.
#14
this is totally pointless,but I can think of ten different kinds of lacquer from chrom-alloy to NasonAll acrylic based.Then there'sResin based lacquers,varnish,etc,etc,I paint custom cars and bikes for a hobby.But what is your point?nitrocellulose is a liquid based form of plastic.Gibson started using it in the late 50,s early 60,s.But what is the reason for you mentioning this?As a matter of fact I drop tune toD to play slide.What does that have to do with thisTo the lady,your english is fine.You were very specific and said A FIGURE.
Last edited by panhead201 at Mar 26, 2012,
#15
This is a wood guitar, not a steel gas tank. There are hundreds of clear types. Not all are meant for wood. How many of your bike lacquers are readily available at Home Depot in an aerosol can for 6 bucks? The "go to" choice for DIY refinishing, especially for your first time, is Nitrocellulose clear. Deft is an example. Thats the point.
#16
I agree,there are hundreds of types.And nitrocellulose is an excellent choice for a guitar finish.But they did'nt mention their budgetand there are sealers that can be applied to any porous finish that eliminates any absorption of a finish coat.I'm sure you've played a guitar with a nitrocellulose coated neck.A les paul custom,something like that.It can be uncomfortable to me sometimes.Too slick for me sometimes.I've hit em with 2000 sanpaper or coursey cloth or used baby powder on my hands.I think we're not disagreeing,just voicing different options and personal preferences.
#17
I agree with you, I'm not a huge fan of nitro necks either. I prefer urethane or satin. I just am going by what he paid for the lute. If the whole guitar is only 20 bucks I doubt he will want to go the whole route and do sanding sealer, grain filler, base coat, primer, paint, clear coat, compound, swirl remover... ect. It can get very expensive. I just wanted to recommend something cheap. And anyway hes staining the thing, I don't think you can or should use sanding sealer or grain filler if you want to keep the wood figure.
#18
If you go back and read the entire thread,they are not trying to maintain the figure of the wood.I know what you're saying and I understand it.What he?she? is saying is that they want to paint a picture(figure) in the surface.Apicture of a bird,dog,her grandma,I don't know,but that's what they meant.It's spruce,man.Its like a blank sheet of paper.There's no figure,as you mean it to preserve.I looked at your tops and the woods are beautiful.Worth preserving and enhancing.It,s just not what they meant.I'm not trying to tell you what to do or argue,But I think if you read it from the beginning you'll see what I'm trying to say.Panhead
#19
Quote by Karel Juwet

I want the colour to be darker, but I still want the grain of the original wood to be visible.


You may be right, this is what I was going by.
#20
yeah,I misunderstood it too til i re-read the whole thing.Seems like they bought it cheap just to practice on,then maybe move on to the good stuff.They did a nice job stripping it though,from the pics.see ya
#21
So, I drew a design on the top of the figure I want.
here's a picture:
http://www3.zippyshare.com/v/44369516/file.html
It's not the definitive design, but it should give you an idea of where I want to get.

I was thinking of maybe using woodburning (pyrography). Would that be doable for a noob like me? Is there someone with woodburning experience on this forum that I could talk to?

If I use pyrography, do I have to apply the stain after the burning or before? Does burned wood absorb the stain?

And for the cost: since I only spent 20 bucks on the instrument, I have more money left for tools and products. (But I prefer stuff that I can use again for other projects)

thanks
#22
I wouldn't try woodburning if you've never done it before. If you make a mistake... thats it. If you use paint and make a mistake you can sand it off. Although if you use paints you'll need to make sure you clear finish will work okay with it.
#23
X-plorer88 is right.And the burnt wood will be black.You can try carving it in very lightly,but again,there's no going back.I don't know if you've ever tried air-brushing,its an option,but I would do it on sealed wood oryou'll never get the paint out of the pores once you've applied it.This way,if you don't like it,youClear spruce is very absorptive.If you carve it in for depth,ypu can always use wood filler and start over.If it was me,I,d go to the lumberyard and buy a piece of spruce about a 1/4 inch thick and 1ft by 1ft.They probably have a scrap around they,ll give you.Or you can get a piece of Luan plywood scrap.Very similar characteristics.GOOD LUCL!!!Now I definitely have to see it when it's done,hopefully along the way if you have time.....panhead2001The decks on my boat are teak and I do stuff like this every year,so I like to experiment.panhead201 It looks like we were both right,or wrong,depending on your point of view.You want to add figure and paint it.If you want to use pyrography,definetly do it BEFORE you seal the wood,otherwise you'll be burning into the sealer and that would not be a good idea in my humble opinion. PS,design looks cool,you,ve got talent
Last edited by panhead201 at Mar 28, 2012,
#24
Now that you mention it, I think I have some planks lying around in my shed.
Maybe I'll try the woodburning, the carving and the painting out on those first and see what works out best.
Also, I'm a guy, in case you didn't notice. Karel is the dutch version of Charles
Last edited by Karel Juwet at Mar 28, 2012,
#25
I apologize,I was thrown by the spelling of your last name.I had no way of knowing that's why I wrote he/she when I did.panhead
#26
Quote by Karel Juwet
Hi
I bought some 20 bucks mandolin a few weeks ago because I wanted to have something to practise my finishing skills on.
So what I want to do with it is give it a new finish (duh!)
I have sanded it down to the wood, which is probably a cheap sprucey kind of wood.
This is a picture of the mandolin:



I want it to be the same colour as this guitar:
http://www.musicstore.de/de_DE/EUR/Gitarren/4/4-Konzertgitarren/Almansa-Studium-Line-Modell-401-Cedar-massive-Zederndecke/art-GIT0003922-000

I want the colour to be darker, but I still want the grain of the original wood to be visible.

I also want to put a figure on the top, so do I need to paint that before I change the wood color or after?
I want the figure to stand out against the darker wood.

Now...
How do I start? I'm a complete noob to woodwork so any help is appreciated.
thanks
Karel

Hi Karel, this product might help you http://www.wudtone.com/shop/?wpsc-product=finishing-kit-burning-sun or you could have a look at options available from http://www.hammerl.com/english/ueber_uns.php another specialist instrument finish company.
#27
Quote by mojojim
Hi Karel, this product might help you http://www.wudtone.com/shop/?wpsc-product=finishing-kit-burning-sun or you could have a look at options available from http://www.hammerl.com/english/ueber_uns.php another specialist instrument finish company.


this stuff certainly keeps the grain on show, the top coat has lacquer in it, you have a choice of satin or extra gloss, example shown below , extra gloss off their website,
#28
Quote by mojojim
this stuff certainly keeps the grain on show, the top coat has lacquer in it, you have a choice of satin or extra gloss, example shown below , extra gloss off their website,


ps , I think pyrography would be ideal for your design , but you really need to invest in the right temp controlled tool so to vary the colour depth of burning, the wire loops around £100 are what pros use because of that.
good luck
#29
Quote by mojojim
ps , I think pyrography would be ideal for your design , but you really need to invest in the right temp controlled tool so to vary the colour depth of burning, the wire loops around £100 are what pros use because of that.
good luck


you need to do the pyrogarphy before you apply finishes onto the wood