#1
Hello fellow guitarists!

I play acoustic guitar and I haven't played in the standard tuning for a very long time. I've tuned my guitar to B F# D F# A C# (low to high) and I've composed quite a few songs in this tuning, but I have a problem. It doesn't sound very good, especially not the low E string. I'm using a thicker string for it but I'm not sure what it does to my guitar.

Should I buy all strings seperately for this tuning? I really appreciate some advice!
Also, if neccesarry I could tune it half a step higher to C G Eb G Bb D, if that's better?
Thank you guys
#2
have you changed the strings? couldnt really tell from the post...
if so, try ajusting the truss rod incase the neck is warped.
of course its tuned pretty low, but after a while that doesnt matter anymore either.
#3
Thanks for the response! I change my guitar strings once a month on average but the thickest string is always buzzing..
#4
"if so, try ajusting the truss rod incase the neck is warped."


Do not do this. You do not adjust your truss rod in case your neck is warped, you adjust your truss rod IF your neck is warped (and then only if you know how it is warped and how to adjust it). What good would adjusting the truss rod do for 6th string buzz on a guitar that is tuned THREE full steps down?

Use a capo and adjust your originals accordingly. That's how McKee does it.


"it's tuned pretty low but after a while that doesn't matter any more."

Huh?
#5
Quote by kiwiug
have you changed the strings? couldnt really tell from the post...
if so, try ajusting the truss rod incase the neck is warped.
of course its tuned pretty low, but after a while that doesnt matter anymore either.



Although the word "warped" is used to describe the unintended curvature of a length of wood, in guitar terminology it would imply that the neck was permanently bent (at least to the point that it could only be repaired by a luthier using steam or heat). The curvature of the neck controlled by a truss rod is called relief.

As far as recommending to someone to "try adjusting the truss rod", no, No, NO. It should only be done if you know what you are doing, using a straight edge and guages. Haphazardly adjusting the rod can cause permanent damage to the neck, body, or cause the rod nut to break.
I'm the only player to be sponsered by 7 guitar companies not to use their products.
#6
Quote by gurreu
Hello fellow guitarists!

I play acoustic guitar and I haven't played in the standard tuning for a very long time. I've tuned my guitar to B F# D F# A C# (low to high) and I've composed quite a few songs in this tuning, but I have a problem. It doesn't sound very good, especially not the low E string. I'm using a thicker string for it but I'm not sure what it does to my guitar.

Should I buy all strings seperately for this tuning? I really appreciate some advice!
Also, if neccesarry I could tune it half a step higher to C G Eb G Bb D, if that's better?
Thank you guys



The guitar isn't going to sound very good at that low of a tuning no matter what guage your using. Most guitars are constructed and optimized to use light to medium guage strings. Tuning down that low is going to affect projection, intonation, and most likely have a fair amount of buzz.
I'm the only player to be sponsered by 7 guitar companies not to use their products.
#7
The most sensible solution is a baritone guitar for tunings that low.

Longer scale equals more string tension.

Yeah I know, guitars cost money, jus' sayin'.
#8
I have wondered why, with all these folks playing around with super-low tunings, the baritone guitar is not making a big surge in popularity.
Now mind, when I started, you never even heard of a baritone guitar, and now the music suppliers all advertise several models.

Still, I wonder if it's a fad thing... The only reason anyone "tuned down" a guitar 40 years ago was a 12-string to ease the string pull a tad, and even then they used a capo to play....To bring it back up to concert pitch.
How about buying a cheap 12-string, only applying 6-strings, and using extra-heavy gauge?