#1
So iv'e decided to take a more disciplined approach to practice, right now i am doing 2 hours daily (cause that how long my attention span lets me ) right now i'm doing

30 Min for scales
15 Min legato
30 Min fingerpicking (mauro giuliani's 120 studies for right hand devolpment)
45 Min chords

What do you think? What would you add, change, whatever, any advice would be appreciated.
#2
Quote by NO11YOU
So iv'e decided to take a more disciplined approach to practice, right now i am doing 2 hours daily (cause that how long my attention span lets me ) right now i'm doing

30 Min for scales
15 Min legato
30 Min fingerpicking (mauro giuliani's 120 studies for right hand devolpment)
45 Min chords

What do you think? What would you add, change, whatever, any advice would be appreciated.



Here's what I would do:

120 minutes- play guitar
#3
Here's what i am trying to do, increase the quality of my 120 minutes of practice.
#4
Quote by NO11YOU
Here's what i am trying to do, increase the quality of my 120 minutes of practice.


I already told you how to do it.
#5
Quote by Aralingh
I already told you how to do it.


You told me the amount of time i should practice, hence quantity.
#6
Quote by NO11YOU
You told me the amount of time i should practice, hence quantity.


I also described how every minute of that amount of time should be spent.
#7
Quote by Aralingh
I also described how every minute of that amount of time should be spent.


With a vague and unhelpful answer.
#8
you need to add time to practice sight-reading and time for technique you don't already know, you should also study some theory, I'm not sure if you need so much time for all just playing chords or scales (presuming you know your scales and understand chords), and all of it should be fingerpicked
#10
Quote by Bad Kharmel
you need to add time to practice sight-reading and time for technique you don't already know, you should also study some theory, I'm not sure if you need so much time for all just playing chords or scales (presuming you know your scales and understand chords), and all of it should be fingerpicked


I'm not underestimating the importance of theory and sight reading, but my primary goal as a guitarist right now is to get the skill to play the music i like.
#11
I believe what he is getting at is that while focused, disciplined, practice is certainly beneficial to one's technique, simply enjoying yourself (which I believe is something far too few people do these days) while playing is far more rewarding and to the point of wanting to be apart of music in the first place.

Music doesn't have a schedule, if it wants to come out it will.

That being said, keep practicing, I know I will.
#12
Quote by wafflesyrup
I believe what he is getting at is that while focused, disciplined, practice is certainly beneficial to one's technique, simply enjoying yourself (which I believe is something far too few people do these days) while playing is far more rewarding and to the point of wanting to be apart of music in the first place.

Music doesn't have a schedule, if it wants to come out it will.

That being said, keep practicing, I know I will.


I see it as a spectrum, some learn by just practicing it and some learn it in a more discipline manner, neither are bad and i don't think the latter has to be frustrating. I feel alright with my schedule, some days are better then others but i do enjoy it. Personally i like discipline and a schedule with my practice and i think it's fun to build your skill like this, also i can always jam and "have fun" after my practice schedule. Different strokes for different folks i guess.
#13
Quote by wafflesyrup
I believe what he is getting at is that while focused, disciplined, practice is certainly beneficial to one's technique, simply enjoying yourself (which I believe is something far too few people do these days) while playing is far more rewarding and to the point of wanting to be apart of music in the first place.

Music doesn't have a schedule, if it wants to come out it will.

That being said, keep practicing, I know I will.


This 100%

There's definitely a balence to be struck between very rigid, structured, learning/practice, and a more freeform approach. Too much of the former and you might find your playing becomes very rigid and stale, but too much of the latter and you'll likely not progress far at all.

While you think you're doing well being all focused all the time, you're actually possibly limiting your brains potental to find and create connections- which you can only really do in a more unstructured environment ("playtime", or sleeping, for example).
#14
A lot depends on what you do on those times. If practicing scales means that you go through scales mostly with melodic patterns and other new ways you can think of, then that's covered.

And how do you practice legato? Do you pick a few short legato parts from songs you're practicing and drill them and create other exercises from them, 'cause that could work

Fingerpicking.. The studies probably are good, but you could start to play songs you want to play already, and your fingerpicking will still improve. Maybe not as much when you focus on other things too, but the trade will give you much more than technique. But note that you practice your fingerpicking with scales too.. You could also of course practice legato with scales.

Chords. Learning new chords, learning progressions.. Sounds good. Do arpeggios step in here? If not, I'd consider adding that.

Sight-reading is important on my opinion too, and it's not that difficult to learn.

But where are the pieces? Etudes are nice and all, but they're for the technical side of things. And concentrating on only technique will leave you sounding boring, musicality is important and it will not start to magically grow as soon as your technique is on a certain level.
#15
Quote by wafflesyrup
I believe what he is getting at is that while focused, disciplined, practice is certainly beneficial to one's technique, simply enjoying yourself (which I believe is something far too few people do these days) while playing is far more rewarding and to the point of wanting to be apart of music in the first place.

Music doesn't have a schedule, if it wants to come out it will.

That being said, keep practicing, I know I will.

I totally disagree with this based on my reading of TS's post.

TS appears to want feedback on a practice schedule that focuses on improving his technique. Telling him that "music comes out on its own time" isn't going to do him any good. That's pseudo-philosophic crap that might apply to songwriting (I disagree 100% with that philosophy, but that's an argument for another thread); what TS is asking for is whether or not the time he's allotting to each item is sufficient.

tl;dr Practicing and playing are two very different things.

TS, that looks good. If you find that you're dissatisfied with how fast you're progressing in one of those areas, give yourself more time to practice that skill at the expense of one that you're making more headway with.
#16
Quote by Geldin

tl;dr Practicing and playing are two very different things.


Yes, they are...but we're not talking about playing, we're only talking about practising.

I don't think Aralingh's comment was very helpful, but that doesn't mean there isn't a point there. Your brain needs time to make connections and associations in an unstructured environment. This isn't "pseudo-philosophical crap", it's psychology.

Quote by Unrelaxed
A lot depends on what you do on those times. If practicing scales means that you go through scales mostly with melodic patterns and other new ways you can think of, then that's covered.


No, it doesn't. This kind of thing is not structed enough, neither is it creative enough. You need balance. Practising rigidly to a metronome/memorising has it's place, but so does freeform learning and practise.

If you don't have the structure in place, then you'll never get anywhere because there's not enough focus. However, if you don't have enough freeform activities in your routine then you'll eventually get bored- or at least not be able to focus your full amount because your brain is trying to assimilate the information on it's own terms while you're trying to feed it more and more information on your terms. Fighting with the natural learning process like this isn't really too productive.

The point of this for TS is: make sure your entire practising time isn't spent just "learning" new information. It needs time to sink in.
#17
What I meant was that the scale part of the practice was gonna work.. Or do you mean that I forgot to mention improvising and creating with the scale? If so, you're right. But seeing as the TS has a goal of just being able to play his favorite pieces I didn't mention it.

While I agree with chainsaw, and I don't practice with a schedule, the practice within those scales, legato, fingerpicking and chords is very easy to make creative and interesting. There's tons of things to practice within them, and with a little analytical thinking you can learn with it just as fast as you need to learn.
#18
IMO you could add some right hand focus, it´s never enough to ensure RH technique for fingerstyle.
Check out Abel Carlevaro´s "Serie Didactica" if you can.
VillaLobos´12 are wonderful both musically and technically.
Etude 1 is great even for beginners. Etude 4 for plucked chords is great too.
Hit me if u want more data, I think I have stuff that might interest you!
Take care!
#19
Quote by chainsawguitar
Yes, they are...but we're not talking about playing, we're only talking about practising.

I don't think Aralingh's comment was very helpful, but that doesn't mean there isn't a point there. Your brain needs time to make connections and associations in an unstructured environment. This isn't "pseudo-philosophical crap", it's psychology.

The trouble is that when you talk about practicing, if you promote an unstructured environment, you're doing it wrong. Practice is all about creating arbitrary structures and limits so that you focus exclusively on a small set of skills with the intention of improving them. Just playing the guitar is that unstructured environment. I agree that just playing for a while is important, but it's not something to include in the middle of an organized practice session.

I stand by what I said about pseudo-philosophical crap about playing and writing music and I think you're misunderstanding the context in which I said that. I was referring to the idea that "music just comes out" whereas I think you might be using my pronouncement in an entirely different manner.
#20
Quote by NO11YOU
So iv'e decided to take a more disciplined approach to practice, right now i am doing 2 hours daily (cause that how long my attention span lets me ) right now i'm doing

30 Min for scales
15 Min legato
30 Min fingerpicking (mauro giuliani's 120 studies for right hand devolpment)
45 Min chords

What do you think? What would you add, change, whatever, any advice would be appreciated.


I like it but why 30 min for scales and only 15 for legato? Legato is an actual technique, where as scales are scales. IMO scales don't help much until you can either play them on the whole neck or understand where they come from, so you can change 1 note and change the scale.

If your already playing them out of the 'box', then disregard what I said.
#22
First off, if you're going to work on being a classical guitarist, you're going to have to step back a little bit from thinking like a "pop" guitarist (any type of music that isn't jazz, flamenco, or classical).
Make sure that you do not use a pick at all for anything. Classical guitarists only use their right hand fingers and nails.
Make sure you either have or are growing your finger nails into nice, contorted shapes.
Make sure you NEVER have your thumb over the fretboard (Hendrix-style).
Reading music notation is essential for classical guitar. Bach didn't write his stuff out in tab.
There is an excellent series of books by Christopher Parkening that would be great for you to look into.

Here's a few things I would personally work on for my schedule:

Repertoire: you have to develop a set of pieces that you can play from memory. That book I mentioned is great for this, as well as Fernando Sor's 20 Estudios for Guitar

Theory: gotta know your theory.

Reading music notation: essential

Exercises/etudes: chromatic octaves! You'llneed stuff specifically for each hand.

Ear training
#23
I don't know that you can really call all other guitarists "pop" guitarists. It smacks just a little of genre elitism and ignorance of other genres.

That said, the actual information about practicing was mostly good (I disagree about never using tabs, since there is a lot to be said for their use that classical notation doesn't handle as well). The rest of it's right, though.
#24
Quote by Geldin
I don't know that you can really call all other guitarists "pop" guitarists. It smacks just a little of genre elitism and ignorance of other genres.

That said, the actual information about practicing was mostly good (I disagree about never using tabs, since there is a lot to be said for their use that classical notation doesn't handle as well). The rest of it's right, though.


It's not my terminology. If you hang around with classical musicians a lot, many of them refer to most "popular" genres as simply "pop." It's not meant to be interpreted as an insult in any way.

The reason I said never to use tab (when learning classical) is because

1. No serious classical guitar college will put anything in tab
2. Tab takes next to know skill to understand. If someone is looking to get better at classical music, developing the skill of sight-reading is a big part of it. You want to at least understand all of the principles of music notation, and how do you get better at it? Practicing it. Constantly.
3. If something isn't handled well by music notation, it's YOUR job to handle it well.
4. Chicks dig sight-readers.