#1
Hi there again :P

Im working on many things right now, but since i have lots of time, and ear training only takes maybe an hour a day to be useful, Im working on hotel california and today i was watching youtube, and ran across an old favorited youtube video of some guy playing chopins nocturne op2 and it occured to me how little i know about theory. I was hoping someone could recommend me a site where some of this classical stuff is covered start to finish. I know a bit about theory, but im listening to this and it just seems like there is so much more going on than a progression and a melody - and knowing a bit about intervals and chord construction and key signatures just doesnt seem to cover it :/

Anyone who can recommend a site more dedicated to piano type classical theory would be greatly appreciated, just something to read to help me pass some of my liesure time
#2
so i'm sorry for completely not answering exactly what you are looking for...but there is a book out there, not a site, a book, Ted Greene's Chord Chemistry...legendary chord theory book. Based on jazz instead classical, so again I'm sorry for not giving what you are looking for but if you're looking to get a solid chord theory understanding, your search stops at the Greene book.
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Quote by CaptainAmerican
I would recommend the marshal MG100

Very versatile and quality sound. It should treat you well
#3
Quote by gerraguitar
so i'm sorry for completely not answering exactly what you are looking for...but there is a book out there, not a site, a book, Ted Greene's Chord Chemistry...legendary chord theory book. Based on jazz instead classical, so again I'm sorry for not giving what you are looking for but if you're looking to get a solid chord theory understanding, your search stops at the Greene book.


Thank you, im just looking for something a bit more advanced. Its not that I know a ton about theory, its just ive read so much stuff about beginning theory, any random one of the multitude of childrens theory books dont do it for me anymore. I just want something a bit more advanced to keep my attention and keep me pushing onward. I know it sounds cliche but everytime i start trying to learn more theory I end up reading the same stuff written by a new person, so im just trying to look for a whole new genre of theory if that makes any sense :/ Jazz or classical or whatever, but just something a bit outside of my comfort zone and new, but not so advanced that it seems like im reading chinese algebra

/e also i wanted advice because ive been to the music store, and dropped alot of money on books about scales, or blues licks, or clapton songs, only to find that they were wastes of money 25$ at a time for stuff that was either useless to me, or 5 pages of substance and 50 pages of filler, or something I could have found on the internet and more easily read.
Last edited by blunderwonder at Mar 26, 2012,
#4
you'll have to check it out, as long as you can read notation and jazz chords make sense to you it'll be a great experience. i've spent days on one page, and the way it's setup and how he explains things is what makes it so great, it's a very practical approach. if jazz is a new thing for you then just don't get discouraged, i don't want to pigeon hole you so i don't know if this will be chinese algebra to you or not but it's definitely worth the $15 it's worth.
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Quote by CaptainAmerican
I would recommend the marshal MG100

Very versatile and quality sound. It should treat you well
#5
^ It's definitely worth a lot more than that... as was his other one (modern chord progressions). Buuuuut the TS might find more help in checking out Ted's site. He can scout the lessons there and see for himself if Ted taught kiddie theory.

Btw blunder, there isn't really a new genre of theory... just additions. And if you want to advance your theory knowledge, you'll need to know where you left off. That is usually aided by reading the TOC or even the back of the book. Gambale's books can help you too.
Last edited by evolucian at Mar 26, 2012,
#6
Quote by evolucian
^ It's definitely worth a lot more than that... as was his other one (modern chord progressions). Buuuuut the TS might find more help in checking out Ted's site. He can scout the lessons there and see for himself if Ted taught kiddie theory.

Btw blunder, there isn't really a new genre of theory... just additions. And if you want to advance your theory knowledge, you'll need to know where you left off. That is usually aided by reading the TOC or even the back of the book. Gambale's books can help you too.


thank you also for input,


Ive read and reread most of things that are in "kiddie theory" books and alot of it I have memorized for no particular reason just something to do.

I dont want to drone on and sound like a broken record but, I guess im more interested in applied theory, and more of the "why and how" than the "what". Im just really tired of rereading the definition of interval and minor scale and 15 pages on rhythm. Im looking into those ted greene books now, both of them actually. I dont know i just figure at this point its better to read something advanced and go back and learn the things i dont know, than keep reading the same stuff over. Just looking for a new direction, and thank you both for your suggestings I am getting both of those books right now. Im hoping the progression book will be interesting also, ive stumped on another site that goes over alot of progressions, its a nice site and very organized if a bit outside of my knowledge base

http://www.angelfire.com/fl4/moneychords/lesson.html

this is the kind of info I look for, something well organized, readable, and more importantly relevant.
#7
Why and how relates to voice leading. You'll find a whole big book on that alone. Greene's book is all about voice leading... carrying the melody with you as you change (as in solo guitar). It gives the chord a big fat name as the note moves side to side. But once you have the basics of something... the process is easier.

You could say it teaches you how to reharmonise as well.
Last edited by evolucian at Mar 26, 2012,
#8
Boy you werent joking lol

i just got the pdf for greenes modern chord progression book and unfortunately some of the diagrams are a little tough to read but its going to take me a few years to get through all of this i think.. maybe more.


alot of it looks fingerpicked which is sort of neat, but i think fussing with this is really going to help my theory and alot of technical aspects

/e also i dont think ive ever done a double stop... so thats going to be rough i bet :/


THANKS.

this book is exactly the type of thing i was looking for.