#1
So my amp acts like a preamp tube died in it (again) right (really low, fuzzy sound). So I'm swappin' tubes, no luck... I start swapping cables... no luck... I start swapping power cables... no luck. Then I narrow it down to my Decimator because the power LED started flickering... So I'm thinking, 'oh great, I have to send it in for repair.' Then I discover it was shipped with a battery in it (I wasn't even aware it had one). The battery died and even though it's plugged into my power supply, it stops working. I remove the battery and it works fine.

What a bunch o' morons. Why would they design it to stop working when the battery dies even when it's plugged into a supply?

Anywho... just had to rant.
"Practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect." -some dude
#2
That's not how it's designed. Maybe your power supply doesn't work, or wasn't plugged in all the way, or the pedal has an issue, but the standard design is for the power supply to cut out the battery from the circuit entirely, so not only does it not drain but it wouldn't matter if it were dead.
#3
You would think so, but it works perfectly now. I put the dead battery back in, and it doesn't function. Maybe it defective... I dunno... I don't use batteries in anything though (not even my EMG's lol) so I'm not worried about it. But sheesh...
"Practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect." -some dude
#4
Yep. It's not the design of the pedal that's at fault. Like Colin said, standard design for anything with both a 9v jack and a battery is this:



The biggest tab is the ground. The two tabs facing the same direction on the right are the power connections. One goes to the battery, the other to the 9v input on the pcb. When a power cable is connected, the power connection going to the battery is disconnected and power feeds directly into the pcb. When no power cable is inserted, power comes from the battery, through the 9v jack, and into the pcb. In other words, it's only one or the other.

It could be something faulty within the pedal, but it's definitely not how its designed to work.
Last edited by chip46 at Mar 26, 2012,
#5
My v3 OCD does the same thing. I always wondered why...
Peavey 5150
Mesa Mark IV
Mesa Single Rectifier (Series 1)
Fender Custom Shop Tonemaster
Roland Microcube

-Whitebox OS 1x12
-Port City OS 1x12

Digidesign Eleven RackAxe Fx Ultra
#6
Well if it is defective, then it's been running on 18V this whole time? The battery is completely dead and the power supply works fine when it's removed and I've been running it on the power supply since I bought it (like I said, I didn't even know it took a battery).

p.s. I'm going to email them and see what they say.
"Practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect." -some dude
Last edited by Prime2515102 at Mar 26, 2012,
#7
I'm pretty sure it only runs on 9v. If you ever unplugged your power supply from the wall or had it disconnected in any way shape or form, and you still have a cable plugged into the input of the pedal, it will drain power from the battery. When you disconnect the cable from the input it stops the battery from draining. That could be your case.
#8
Any time you troubleshoot a problem, always start with the lowest common denominator - power, cables, connections, etc... Avoid jumping to the extreme until you've verified everything else is good.

Plugging a cable directly into your amp would've saved the problem of swapping out tubes.

Consider it a lesson learned.
#9
Quote by chip46
I'm pretty sure it only runs on 9v. If you ever unplugged your power supply from the wall or had it disconnected in any way shape or form, and you still have a cable plugged into the input of the pedal, it will drain power from the battery. When you disconnect the cable from the input it stops the battery from draining. That could be your case.


Well no, I don't care that the battery is dead. It's that it doesn't function with the dead battery in it WITH the power supply connected. Remove the dead battery (not putting a new one in it) and it works. That's the oddest thing I've ever seen. Dead battery or no battery present, what's the difference? lol It doesn't make sense...
"Practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect." -some dude
#10
Quote by KG6_Steven
Any time you troubleshoot a problem, always start with the lowest common denominator - power, cables, connections, etc... Avoid jumping to the extreme until you've verified everything else is good.

Plugging a cable directly into your amp would've saved the problem of swapping out tubes.

Consider it a lesson learned.


lol yeah, I was kicking myself in the ass at that point lol I've just been pissing around with this amp so much lately I assumed it was that.
"Practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect." -some dude
#11
Quote by Prime2515102
Well no, I don't care that the battery is dead. It's that it doesn't function with the dead battery in it WITH the power supply connected. Remove the dead battery (not putting a new one in it) and it works. That's the oddest thing I've ever seen. Dead battery or no battery present, what's the difference? lol It doesn't make sense...

Either your power supply doesn't work, the ISP's power input doesn't work, or the switch on the DC input doesn't work. Those are the only things that would cause this.