#1
How do you suggest doing this? I perfer playing instead of just looking at a peice of paper and trying to memorize it.
#2
Fretboard warrior. Really easy, free program. Works better than anything else IMO.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#3
^^Like junior said Fretboard Warrior works

you can also try making charts and filing them in with the right notes something like this (this is a quick open to 12th fret chart, you should make a bigger one, if you choose to use this instead):

e|_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _|
B|_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _|
G|_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _|
D|_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _|
A|_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _|
E|_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _|

if you have a friend that already knows you can have them pick a fret and have you name the note, or he/she can name a note and you show them somewhere you can play that note.

finaly there is an exercise you can use on musictheory.net
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#4
Its not really that much of a task to accomplish so just go for it. You very quickly see that everything starts repeating itself so you just have to remember 7 letters of the alphabet with a couple of sharps and flats in between

examples:
  • the top E string is the same as the bottom E string, you just have to learn 5 strings now
  • you probably already know the names of the open strings
  • everything repeats after the 12th fret, so thats leaves only half of the fretboard to learn
  • if you know the basic open chords...the root note is usually the note the chord is names after....so you've probably got F, G and C now as well
  • an octave over two strings is 2 frets up (i.e. the 3 string powerchord shape without the middle note), 2 strings and 3 frets on the B and high E strings
  • if you know how to tune the guitar, one string up and 5 frets back is also the same note, four frets on the B string
  • one string up and 7 frets up is also the same note, being the octave, 5+7 = 12, again 8 notes on the B string


If you learn some chord theory and intervals it makes it even easier to fill in the blanks. If you for example, know the fifth over the root note (i.e. power chord) you can easily name the note one string and frets up. If you know the fourth you know the note on the same fret and one string up..... This is if not for anything else is a good reason to learn the circle of fifths.
#5
Learn triad shapes all along the fretboard and try to think about what notes you're playing in a triad. Then learn other kinds of chords and keep in mind what notes you're playing. Easy, and very effective.

And if you can already play scale patterns, then go through them and sing(or say, but singing is better) the notes. Go back and forth a few times and then start to mix it up.

EDIT: Though why would you have to be able to play scale patterns for that Anyway, I like that exercise
Last edited by Unrelaxed at Mar 27, 2012,
#7
Quote by Slash'sProtege
Reading through this definetly made me realize i have to learn alot more about basic theory


Well, it's good you are actually trying to learn this stuff. Lots of people who have been playing for years and years still don't know any of this, so +1 for effort!

One thing I'll recommend is to forget about memorizing the entire fretboard. IMO it's just as useless as learning tons of different scales. Sure, you might use this knowledge from time to time, but if you understand how it works instead you can just figure this out on the spot instead and work out your brain at the same time.

There are no sharps/flats between E & F and B & C. Memorizing this simple fact is far more important than memorizing where every individual note is. Once you get better at the counting required to figure out where every note is I promise you will find it quite intuitive to find absolutely any note on the fretboard.

If you want a bit of a tip, while in many ways it contradicts what I just told you about memorizing the fretboard you could memorize where all the octaves are on your fretboard. It makes finding individual notes easier when you can seperate your fretboard into octaves and IMO gives you a better understanding of the range of your instrument.

If you want more resources to research theory, I made quite a lengthy post a week ago filled with things which should keep you occupied for awhile: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1527598

To close this up, I'll say this: People highly underestimate the mental aspect of music. While it is excellent to be able to do something from memory, IMO it isn't a good way to progress and I don't see how you wouldn't hit a wall with this approach eventually. If you enjoy doing mental math, you're in luck because that's pretty much all music theory is.

I whole-heartedly encourage someone with a bit of experience to debate me on this because I like to learn new things too!
Quote by Jesus
Gaza Strip- home. At least it was before I fucked ereythang up...
#8
Quote by JimDawson
There are no sharps/flats between E & F and B & C. Memorizing this simple fact is far more important than memorizing where every individual note is. Once you get better at the counting required to figure out where every note is I promise you will find it quite intuitive to find absolutely any note on the fretboard.


I thought.. That this is what is meant by memorizing the fretboard? Building a mental map through repeating the note finding process again and again until it becomes intuitive. It's not like TS is talking about having a mental photo with 6 strings and dots with the note name inside it.. Right?

EDIT: Ok... I read the original thread starting post and it does sound like that...
Last edited by Unrelaxed at Mar 27, 2012,
#9
Quote by JimDawson
To close this up, I'll say this: People highly underestimate the mental aspect of music. While it is excellent to be able to do something from memory, IMO it isn't a good way to progress and I don't see how you wouldn't hit a wall with this approach eventually. If you enjoy doing mental math, you're in luck because that's pretty much all music theory is.

I whole-heartedly encourage someone with a bit of experience to debate me on this because I like to learn new things too!


Not really debate but I'll concur! Yesterday I found this rather inspiring video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Rhvxy0r2Do
#11
Quote by seljer
Not really debate but I'll concur! Yesterday I found this rather inspiring video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Rhvxy0r2Do


Good stuff! I'm usually quite wary of people who talk about things "that way" but he made lots of sense.

Now, back on topic before I derail this thread.
Quote by Jesus
Gaza Strip- home. At least it was before I fucked ereythang up...
#12
Another method is to start with just 1 or 2 notes and memorise them all over the fretboard before repeating the process with another 2 notes. It may take time but its easier with just a handful at a time.
#13
Ill say it again because it cant be overlooked on how well it will help you. TRIADS. If you learn triads, and its root note, you can learn the fretboard while working on chords all over the neck. Its how I learned
R.I.P. Randy Rhoads