#1
Are there any good, cheap ($100 or less) dynamic mics that I can use on a bass amp in a live situation? Also, I play metal, if that matters.
Originally posted by supersac
mmh no one has seen god...
no one has seen your penis...
...YOUR PENIS MUST BE GOD!
#2
AKG D112 might be just out of your budget, but it's a decent mic. Maybe look for a used one
My Soundcloud
Always up for some C4C, been compared to Frank Turner, The Cure's Robert Smith and Bruce Springsteen so check out my stuff if you like the sound of that
#3
Are you going to be using it in conjuction with a DI or on its own?

Almost all sound engineers favour a DI, in my experience you'll encounter some resistance when asking to have your cab mic'd up, so it's best to take your own engineer who knows your sound.


I'd consider the Samson Q Kick, Red5 Audio RVD1, Samson Q7, Audix F12 or Audix I-5.
#4
I may have to splurge a little bit for an AKG D112. But when I think about it, DI sounds pretty nice and easy.
Originally posted by supersac
mmh no one has seen god...
no one has seen your penis...
...YOUR PENIS MUST BE GOD!
#5
Quote by mitchgosche2011
I may have to splurge a little bit for an AKG D112. But when I think about it, DI sounds pretty nice and easy.

The Red5 RVD1 is a really good alternative to the D112 at 1/3 of the price....a lot of people actually prefer it. Not sure how easy they are to get hold of outside the UK though.
#6
Hmm, I might be going against the grain, but generally speaking I would always mic up a bass amp as well as get the DI, whenever possible. There's some warmth and punch that seems much more present in the amp's output that the DI never quite captures, and as a result I find that if you have a DI on its own you have to use a lot more compression on the bass to get it to sit right and to carry any weight.

Anyway, I'd say the best thing is to send the bass through a good DI box, and use the DI's 'thru' output to feed into the bass amp, then mic up the amp. All the engineer needs to do is time-allign the amp signal to the DI one, and there will be no phase issues, and then he/she can play around tonally to his/her heart's content. Typical mics are mainly already mentioned... generally speaking, people tend to use a lot of the same mics they would on kick ( AKG D112, Audix D6, Sennheiser MD421 etc.) though I'm surprised the i5 was mentioned - wouldn't have thought it gives much low end punch but I've not tried it, admittedly.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#7
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Hmm, I might be going against the grain, but generally speaking I would always mic up a bass amp as well as get the DI, whenever possible. There's some warmth and punch that seems much more present in the amp's output that the DI never quite captures, and as a result I find that if you have a DI on its own you have to use a lot more compression on the bass to get it to sit right and to carry any weight.

Anyway, I'd say the best thing is to send the bass through a good DI box, and use the DI's 'thru' output to feed into the bass amp, then mic up the amp. All the engineer needs to do is time-allign the amp signal to the DI one, and there will be no phase issues, and then he/she can play around tonally to his/her heart's content. Typical mics are mainly already mentioned... generally speaking, people tend to use a lot of the same mics they would on kick ( AKG D112, Audix D6, Sennheiser MD421 etc.) though I'm surprised the i5 was mentioned - wouldn't have thought it gives much low end punch but I've not tried it, admittedly.

I wish you were a house engineer at more of the places I've gigged....
#8
Quote by kyle62
I wish you were a house engineer at more of the places I've gigged....

Haha, apart from if I'm strapped for cash I only really do live work as a favour to people I know if the engineer can't make it lol. I find that despite the adrenaline, I still don't enjoy the time from load-in to doors opening at all, and once the bands start I only enjoy the professionally-behaved bands Maybe if I got to work at bigger venues with nicer gear and acts that can arrive midday to begin setup I would be calmer, but the studio is so much more chilled out and I get to do things like mic + DI every time, instead of having to make sure I have enough inputs on the desk or enough time to setup mics that aren't completely necessary.

In small rooms though,I have been known not to use a bass DI if the bands know how to manage their own stage levels, as the room tends to fill with low end anyway, and a lot of the time the bass DI adds too much clicky string noise in a live mix unless you roll loads of high end off/take the amp's DI output (thankfully most bass amps now have this, which helps a lot to get a workable tone if DI is your only option) though I still try and use a decent amount of the bass' stage volume to bulk up the DI.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#9
421 + DI has always been my go to for bass. Havent tried a D112, im gonna do that this friday.

Gonna do a bit of a hijack here but is it worth using multiple mics on a bass cab if you are gonna use DI? IE a D112 and a 421.
#10
Personally I wouldn't bother multi-miking bass amps (apart from maybe a room mic for quirky rock and shoegaze type stuff) as all I use the mic for is to capture the power and impact of the low end. I'll use the original DI to accentuate the note definition and string noise, and then a duplicate DI with a LPF at 500Hz or lower and a v. high ratio compressor to fill out the gap between mic and clean DI. Then I might add a distorted duplicate of the DI very low in the mix to gel the guitars and bass, if it's a heavier production.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.