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#1
Do you think all "unique" and "original" guitar ideas are taken?
Will there ever be any more guitarists added to someones list of greatest guitar players? Or do you think that all original styles and riffs have been used already by other guitar players?
#2
There's definitely more ideas to be thought up. I'm still waiting for the next Brian May to come around, the orchestrated guitar sound is my favorite of all time.
#4
That is like saying, all the original thoughts have been had, so don't bother trying to think of anything original...

I can think of original music ideas right now.

most of the guitarists we think of as great were pioneers, so any more great ones will probably be pioneering other music styles. for myself personally, I know what I like, I will listen to new stuff, but mostly I prefer listening to the old stuff. So I probably wont pay much attention to new guys....
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#5
No I do not believe so. There are only a couple legendary guitarist per decade. Unfortunately I would say the most recent would be John Mayer... people like him... My list of legends per decade are. 60's- Jerry Garcia, Hendrix. 70's- Jimmy Page, Angus Young. 80's- Slash, Eddie Van Halen. 90's- Billy Corgan, John Frusciante. 00's- John Mayer, Jack White. Can you crit my stuff? http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/Dhclark92/
#6
Quote by sydrock
Do you think all "unique" and "original" guitar ideas are taken?
Will there ever be any more guitarists added to someones list of greatest guitar players? Or do you think that all original styles and riffs have been used already by other guitar players?


Yup, they're all taken, you might as well just give up now.
shred is gaudy music
#7
As long as there are new musicians who don't, for some reason, share the same wavelengths in their brains, there will continue to be unique compositions.

Also, kudos to the Brian May mention. I feel he doesn't get as much attention as is deserved.
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#8
Quote by eGraham
...
Also, kudos to the Brian May mention. I feel he doesn't get as much attention as is deserved...

He's not dead yet...is he?
#9
Quote by jetwash69
He's not dead yet...is he?

Nope, he's not. Which is good. Too many rock musicians from that era died young.
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#10
didn't you post this in the guitar techniques forum already?
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#11
Quote by sydrock
Do you think all "unique" and "original" guitar ideas are taken?
Will there ever be any more guitarists added to someones list of greatest guitar players? Or do you think that all original styles and riffs have been used already by other guitar players?


You don't have to be "unique" or "original" to sound good.
#13
Quote by jetwash69
Just look at Led Zeppelin.


A more recent, and personal, example would be Orianthi. I love her to pieces and listen to her music incessantly, but she's not doing anything different than most rockers with a late '80s influence.

Unless you're straight-up copying someone else's riffs and melodies, whatever you create is by definition "original". You're putting your own unique spin on it just by having written it, especially if it's you expressing yourself. Ori's "Feels Like Home" really resonates with me because it's about moving to California and starting over, which is what I did. That's why the song connects with me, not because she used a scale I've never heard before.
Last edited by CarsonStevens at Mar 28, 2012,
#14
You don't have to be original when writing music, just be aware that if everyone did this we'd be stuck playing the same music forever.

Music has to grow. Move forward.
#15
Quote by griffRG7321
You don't have to be original when writing music, just be aware that if everyone did this we'd be stuck playing the same music forever.

Music has to grow. Move forward.


Yes, but what exactly is "moving forward" or "being unique" when it comes to music?

Seems to me like when most people ask this question, it's usually some avant-garde-wannabe teen who thinks he's being "revolutionary" by not wanting to use scales and chords, man. 'cause everybody else uses scales and chords, man, and he wants to be different.

Sure, I'd say doing something like making a fusion of ska and polka might be considered unique, but I doubt it'd catch on, and you're still working with the same notes everyone else is.

I'm gonna write my next song in the key of J. It's gonna be awesome.
Last edited by CarsonStevens at Mar 28, 2012,
#16
Quote by CarsonStevens
Yes, but what exactly is "moving forward" or "being unique" when it comes to music?

Seems to me like when most people ask this question, it's usually some avant-garde-wannabe teen who thinks he's being "revolutionary" by not wanting to use scales and chords, man. 'cause everybody else uses scales and chords, man, and he wants to be different.

Sure, I'd say doing something like making a fusion of ska and polka might be considered unique, but I doubt it'd catch on, and you're still working with the same notes everyone else is.

I'm gonna write my next song in the key of J. It's gonna be awesome.


It's not about being different for the sake of being different.
It's just about not just copying other people.
There's no point in replicating Eric Claptons style unless you really want to play in a Cream cover band. If people want to listen to Eric Clapton they'd listen to Eric Clapton, not an unauthentic second grade copy of him. So just try and find your own style.
You can still use older ideas but you have to expand on them, not just replicate them.
#17
Quote by CarsonStevens
Yes, but what exactly is "moving forward" or "being unique" when it comes to music?

Seems to me like when most people ask this question, it's usually some avant-garde-wannabe teen who thinks he's being "revolutionary" by not wanting to use scales and chords, man. 'cause everybody else uses scales and chords, man, and he wants to be different.



Trying things which haven't been done before. What if Monteverdi hadn't pushed the boundaries of renaissance polyphony, what if Beethoven stuck strictly to sonata form? what if Stravinsky didn't compose the Rite of spring, what if Hendrix strummed open chords on an acoustic guitar? What if Satriani didn't release surfing with the alien?

You might not like contemporary music, but it's new, it's people experimenting and seeing what new paths music can take. Fast forward 200 years from now. Is everyone still listening to I IV V?
#18
The entire Baroque period was one gigantic triplet, and yet we still use them today....

"dah, da, da", -Da, da- "Dah, da, da", - Dah- "da, da, da" And lo and behold, the "strum pattern" for, "Jesu, Joy of Man's desiring".

Fast forward to 1963: "Da, da, Da", "da, Da, da".... "D, U D"....."U, D U"..... "Close your eyes and I'll kiss you, tomorrow I'll miss you... Hey those darn Beatles know a good thing when they pinched it......

(Triplet measures in quotes)....I could go on, mercifully, I won't.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 28, 2012,
#20
Quote by griffRG7321
.......what if Hendrix strummed open chords on an acoustic guitar?
Then he would have been channeling Richie Havens, and most likely tuned to a chord...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 28, 2012,
#21
Quote by griffRG7321
Trying things which haven't been done before. What if Monteverdi hadn't pushed the boundaries of renaissance polyphony, what if Beethoven stuck strictly to sonata form? what if Stravinsky didn't compose the Rite of spring, what if Hendrix strummed open chords on an acoustic guitar? What if Satriani didn't release surfing with the alien?

You might not like contemporary music, but it's new, it's people experimenting and seeing what new paths music can take. Fast forward 200 years from now. Is everyone still listening to I IV V?


We're probably coming at this from different angles, then. What I meant was, the people I'm talking about would call Monteverdi "unoriginal" simply because he was using polyphony at all.

I'm not insisting people play pentatonics over I IV V for the rest of humanity's tenure on this planet, but I think that there's a huge difference between, say, being a little more inventive in one's note choices and throwing a fit because there's only 12 notes in a scale. It's just my observation, but it seems like more people who stress over being unique fall into the latter category than the former.

Touching on the Clapton example mentioned, is Clapton the first person to do what he did, ever? I never got that impression, TBH. He just did what he did really, really well. IMHO.

Also, sure; Beethoven pushed his boundaries and wrote stuff other than sonatas. How many of us are the next Beethoven? How many of us are setting out with the express goal to reinvent music, versus just writing what we love/what the audience wants to hear to make a living? Sure, I'd say it's one thing to wonder if you're stuck in a rut when every song you write is in the key of A (my current problem, if you can even call it that), but another entirely if you're worried about music as a whole being "dead" because everyone's still harmonizing chords and that's like, old news, man.
#22
Quote by CarsonStevens
We're probably coming at this from different angles, then. What I meant was, the people I'm talking about would call Monteverdi "unoriginal" simply because he was using polyphony at all.
Music, like everything else on the planet, follows Darwinian principles. You can be as original as you want, but any form depends on a wide acceptance. True radicality, may just end up as being an "evolutionary dead end".

We've become largely accustomed to the downbeat on one, as the chord returns to the tonic. It obviously fulfills a need in us, as we march in armies to it, find our lovers by it, and get buried to it.

Taking a cue from the Apple Corporation, you have to create a need for a product, it's not simply enough to create a product.
#23
try using 12-tone theory on guitar or other things contemporary classical musicians like John Cage and Milton Babitt used that certainly would be unique and original
Yeah I'm that guy who says I'm right
but more than likely is wrong

It happens doesn't it?
#24
Quote by griffRG7321
...what if Hendrix strummed open chords on an acoustic guitar? ...


Then he probably would not have been murdered.
#25
Quote by dumbface12
try using 12-tone theory on guitar or other things contemporary classical musicians like John Cage and Milton Babitt used that certainly would be unique and original


But John Cage wasn't a musician, he was a con/performance "artist".
#26
Quote by dumbface12
try using 12-tone theory on guitar or other things contemporary classical musicians like John Cage and Milton Babitt used that certainly would be unique and original


John Cage is not contemporary, he died like 20 years ago.
And 12 tone music is also over 100 years old now, so it's not really all that original of an idea anymore.

There are even some 12 tone pieces for guitar like this suite: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmsA9MJvu60
And theres also some Chamber music by Schönberg that includes the guitar.

I always wanted to learn some of these pieces to annoy people who force me to play for them.
#28
Quote by sydrock
Do you think all "unique" and "original" guitar ideas are taken?
No, definitely not.

Quote by sydrock
Will there ever be any more guitarists added to someones list of greatest guitar players?
Yes, there certainly will.

Quote by sydrock
Or do you think that all original styles and riffs have been used already by other guitar players?
No, I do not.

You asked some closed questions there. But to elaborate:

The thing about "unique" and "original" ideas is that they are "unique" and "original" thus you can't think of what someone else's unique and original ideas might be until they come along and deliver them.

The second question is too broad in scope. Yes there will be another guitarist added to someone's list of greatest guitar players. My daughter already has me at the top of her list and she is someone. -though clearly she is biased.
Si
#32
Quote by 20Tigers
people clapped at the end of that? Seriously? I'd ask for my money back.


I thought it was hilarious, and I actually liked some of the individual lines. I'm willing to bet they also played other compositions, but I found that to be pretty awesome.
#33
Quote by Life Is Brutal
I thought it was hilarious, and I actually liked some of the individual lines. I'm willing to bet they also played other compositions, but I found that to be pretty awesome.


Sorry, my dissonance filter clogged up at around 45 seconds and I had to close the window. Darned filter! Sheltering me from such shear genius. Oh well.

Maybe when I clean out the filter I'll come back and be able to appreciate it more. Until then, I just won't know what I'm missing.
#34
Quote by jetwash69
Sorry, my dissonance filter clogged up at around 45 seconds and I had to close the window. Darned filter! Sheltering me from such shear genius. Oh well.

Maybe when I clean out the filter I'll come back and be able to appreciate it more. Until then, I just won't know what I'm missing.


The end 20 seconds actually hit me really hard, and I actually tabbed that out. Its one of the coolest tone row phrases I've ever heard.
#35
Quote by Life Is Brutal
The end 20 seconds actually hit me really hard, and I actually tabbed that out. Its one of the coolest tone row phrases I've ever heard.


OK, I'll clean out the filter and check back...
#36
I'm back. That's pretty esoteric. Perhaps it's an acquired taste? Maybe I'm just biased against accoustic guitars. Hey, to each his own, and I'm glad this work has found an appreciative audience.
#37
Quote by jetwash69
I'm back. That's pretty esoteric. Perhaps it's an acquired taste? Maybe I'm just biased against accoustic guitars. Hey, to each his own, and I'm glad this work has found an appreciative audience.


Its hard to get used to it, but I listen to a shitload of progressive metal, and I spend a lot of time on Ron Jarzombek.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rF4-Pb8va88

He uses tone rows in all his stuff, and he uses them to create these crazily complex harmonies and resolutions, while also using them to create some of the best/coolest melodic lines I've ever heard.

If you have an hour to do nothing, or just chill, I would suggest that everyone start working through that album. There's just so much awesomely unique stuff in this.

He's had training in both jazz and classical styles, and just gives no fucks to what things are supposed to sound "nice". The guy is my hero and my main inspiration for playing guitar.

3:32, 4:09, 4:24, 5:54 are points of interest in that first vid.
Last edited by Life Is Brutal at Apr 1, 2012,
#38
Quote by Life Is Brutal


Well, that is a million times more appealing to me. I'll bet Ron was an influence for these guys:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aE27a1Eybck. This medley might not represent the influence as much as some of their other stuff.

I saw them play this venue a while before then. The female guitarist had an all grey Dean V at the show I attended. And she had a Marshall combo back then (MG?). Plus they had a flute player with them. She broke a string and borrowed a Strat from the headlining band for the rest of the song while they restrung her Dean for her. She had to struggle when the song took her into the 3 frets missing on the Strat. Unfortunetly they didn't stretch the string and she was struggling to get the guitar in tune the rest of the night, F-ing with the tuners every couple of bars. She hid her frustration from the audience pretty well, but I really felt sorry for her. Hope she kept the old hardtail Dean and brings it on stage as a backup in case she breaks another string. Tuning a Floyd on the fly would be a much bigger challenge.
#39
I'm not hearing the influence of what makes them sound like Jarzombek outside of some very generalized themes and atmospheres.

Perhaps Solitarily Speaking of Hypothetical Confinement didn't quite portray what I wanted to show. This shows pretty accurately what Jarzy does mainly. and 2:28 is so frigging awesome. Point is, everything that Jarzy does is mind bending in some way.

To me, at least.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CHAUQNTwYZo

And I love to promote these guys, since they're recording a new album apparently, which is sick.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PsrATWwxdgE

Point is, if you think all the good ideas are taken, you're doing it wrong.

And holy shit, I just remembered how awesome that BTA song is.
Last edited by Life Is Brutal at Apr 1, 2012,
#40
Quote by Life Is Brutal
I'm not hearing the influence of what makes them sound like Jarzombek outside of some very generalized themes and atmospheres.
...

Well, you know, all their stuff is their arrangements of video game songs, so that restricts them a lot. That pretty much just leaves room from generalized themes and atmospheres.

Anyway, it's possible they've never even heard of Jarzombek directly and it's just the his general influence of the Austin metal scene. Surely Jarzombek has had some influence there.
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