#1
So, I've started doing barre chords. I tried the A form barre chord both ways I've read about, using the ring finger to bar the 2 - 4 strings, or using the pinky on 2, ring on 3, middle on 4.

Using the ring finger to bar means I either have to bar the 1st string, too, or mute it, because I definitely cannot clear it with my ring finger while barring 2-4. My finger's don't bend back much at all.

I was trying alternatives and came up with this: ring finger on 4, pinky on 3, middle on 2. Basically, it is an A-minor form barre chord and then you slide the middle finger over one fret to make the A form barre chord. It felt a little weird having the middle finger go sideways like that, but I got all the strings to ring clear, and it was very easy.

Does anyone else do the A-form barre chord this way or does anyone know of any good reason I should not do the A-form barre chord this way?

Thanks,

Ken
#2
Normally I just use my ring finger to form a bar. Sometimes the e-string sounds and sometimes it doesn't. To my ears, it doesn't make too much of a difference. But if I really need it to ring out, I'd use the pinky on 2, ring on 3, middle on 4 way (helpful if going from A to Bb).

The Am form and sliding the middle sounds like it would feel uncomfortable. But if you can do it and you feel comfortable doing it, go ahead. It's just the other ways might make it easier to switch chords. From how I am imagining it, your way sort of 'tangles' your fingers, so switching might take more effort.
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#3
If I understand correctly, the way I do this barre is using my index finger to barre the 4th, 3rd, and 2nd strings. That seems to me the most comfortable way. And then for an Am I do middle finger on the 4th, ring finger on 3rd, and index on 2nd. That is if I'm thinking of the right chord.
#4
The way you are hodling the A chord is perfectly fine...I do it all three ways described depending on what chord I came from and where I'm going.
#5
Putting the middle on 4, ring on 3, pinky on 2 would be easy if I was not barring with the index. So I could use this for an open A, for example. But when barring with the index finger, the palm rotates and the 2/3/4 combo tool becomes wider, so the middle finger winds up being very far from the fret making it harder to do it clean, or if I try to get it closer to the fret, then that has a tendency to push the other two fingers onto or over the fret, particularly the pinky. I think this problem is exacerbated the higher up the fret I go since the frets are closer together.

Sneaking the middle finger under the pinky makes it so the middle finger is not does not have to go alongside the ring finger as much, the "tool" made by these three fingers becomes narrower and all three can be placed close behind the fret.

I'll have to see if it is too tricky to get into or out of the position, though, since I haven't really played with it much.

Ken
#6
Quote by TheTroy
If I understand correctly, the way I do this barre is using my index finger to barre the 4th, 3rd, and 2nd strings. That seems to me the most comfortable way. And then for an Am I do middle finger on the 4th, ring finger on 3rd, and index on 2nd. That is if I'm thinking of the right chord.

We're not talking about the open A, just the A form.


TS, the way you're playing the A chord form is extremely uncomfortable, for me at least. I don't think it would be possible to actually use it in a song. It's ridiculously awkward. If you can do it that way, there's no reason that you can't do it with your middle finger on the D string, ring on the G, and pinky of the B. You're barring with your index either way. Work at it normally, either with a ring finger barre - which will become easier as you practice more - or with your middle, ring, and pinky on the D, G, and B strings respectively.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.