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#1
Pick a random song by a non-metal famous electric guitarist. Pick a random song by a metal famous electric guitarist. You probably find it harder to play the metal guitarist's tunes.

Outrageous thread title aside, metal guitarists do seem to command greater technical guitar playing ability. Whenever non-metal guitarists are ranked in a list of "greatest guitarists", it is usually based on their musicianship, not on their guitar skills. Either they are great composers, stage actors or they command an influential kind of attitude that people dig and want to copy. Not because they can play something most people can't play. That's the definition of a great guitarist, isn't it?

Surprisingly, I'm not a metalhead. I do listen to metal but it is by far the genre I listen the most to. You will usually find me listening to rock, early pop, grunge or something funky or bluesy. But the songs that I can play on guitar that I am most proud of having learnt are metal tunes. The amount of times I listen to a favourite rock song, decide to serch for the tab, play it and think "is that it?" The amount of times I listen to a favourite metal song and decide to search for the tab and I'm excited by the challenge it presents; I know it's going to take a few days to learn such a difficult tune.

How does everyone else feel? I hope I am deeply wrong and that you guys will tell me about a non-metal guitarist whose tabs I WILL get excited about.
#3
Joe bonamassa could be a good start. And maybe some Alex lifeson and Joe satriani.
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#4
Quote by cliff_em_all
Learn this then.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=98y0Q7nLGWk

It's not metal.


But that's not electric guitar. I'm perfectly aware of the talent and ability of classical guitarists. What I want is a guitar hero who can do stuff on an electric guitar that would blow me away without having to resort to shredding. There's so much potential with an electric guitar that there isn't with many other instruments. Many metal guitarists put alot of emphasis on fast melody, but there's so much opportunity to create rhythm and texture with a guitar and fuse that with a breathtaking melody.

"It's not metal"
#5
Percussive acoustic players often have frankly insane technique. Rory Gallagher played some really intricate pieces, as did Gary Moore. Dick Dale plays some seriously hard lines too, especially in terms of stamina
Also, are you saying the definition of a great guitarist is someone who plays stuff that other people can't? If so I disagree massively.
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Last edited by Paddy McK at Mar 30, 2012,
#6
Jazz, surely? I mean some of Joe Pass' stuff sounds almost simple when you first listen to it, but the ridiculous fluidity of chord changes is definitely a taxing technical feat.
#7
Quote by rhino1957
Joe bonamassa could be a good start. And maybe some Alex lifeson and Joe satriani.


I can play Awmawy (not very well mind lol). But that's still shredding in my opinion. I'm looking for someone who can play super difficult rhythm guitar or something, which isn't repetitive. Or someone who can play lead and rhythm at the same time where the lead isn't something super fast but to play both at same time is difficult (although I guess such a tune would be finger picked).
#9
I guess it all boils down to a couple of things:

1) Whats cool in a genre and what do people concentrate on? Sick shred skillz or leather pants and looking so hot yu literally melt the ladies with your stare?
2) Does complexity equal good music? A lot of musicains think that complex songs arent neceseraly the best sounding... Why make something overcomplicated and complex when something simpler and catchier will soundbetter?

I personaly judge music by value of composition rather then complexity... if that makes sence. It either sounds good or it doesnt regardless of techniques and tools used to achive it. Advanced techniques ar eonly a tool after all...

As for cool non metla guitarists check out jazz people, a lot of blue players are amazing. Also check out Lindsay Buckingham from Fleetwood Mac - guys got incredible skills and odd techniqes....
#10
Uli Jon Roth, minus his Scorpions stuff.

Eric Johnson isn't metal. Nor is Andy Timmons or Guthrie Govan. Or Richie Kotzen these days.

I could see how they'd be lumped in with other shred-types though (I mean that in a less derogatory way than it sounds). I suppose Jazz players often have great technique, but they take a less prominent role in the music than their metal counter-parts, so perhaps that's a factor.
#14
Why does it matter if it's acoustic or electric?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNGafGBTC7A

This is some fantastic guitar technique, and ruling it out because it's acoustic if unfair. If anything, it counts more because of the limitations that acoustic guitars give.

Also, Rob mother****ing Scallon.
Last edited by TextOnTheScreen at Mar 30, 2012,
#15
I am a metalhead, and I find that metal is one of the EASIEST music styles to play shred is easy, try taking some death metal guitarist and asking him to play slap guitar. It has already been mentioned, but Guthrie Govan is a fantastic player, and if you consider his stuff typical shred then I would say you are overgeneralizing. I can't play Jazz (of fusion for that matter) to save my life... I think that most metal gets off on the cheap stuff, most metalheads are just scale shredders (myself included) who kind of lose a bit of the musicality that Jazz or learned blues guitarist are so proficient with.
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#16
Being a great player is DEFINITELY not playing what most people can play. It is being able to play great music, to move people with music, convey emotions, convey artistic excellence.

I'll put Brian May and Jeff Beck ahead of Malmsteen anytime I make a great guitar players list... I'd probably also put Gilmour there too, SRV, and a few others. Music is much, much, much more than technical ability or shredding alone.
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#17
Quote by rhino1957
Joe bonamassa could be a good start. And maybe some Alex lifeson and Joe satriani.


Sorry should've replied to you all in one go.

Just watched Joe Bonamassa's Stop! with the video of them in the studio. Thought there was gonna be no vocals to begin with but I was impressed when he started singing aswell!

Alex Lifeson, I'll try get into Rush and give some of their songs a go and report back.
#19
Never mind, didn't read. Still don't see the point.
Last edited by Aralingh at Mar 30, 2012,
#20
oh yea and to the guy saying metalheads cant do slap bass has clearly never heard of alex webster. that mofo is the best slap bassist ive ever heard of.
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#22
As an acoustic musician.... Here is your flatpick and your Martin dread. Now, play Blackberry Blossom like Doc Watson. Oh, he doubles the speed the second time through....

Have you heard Bob Brozman's or Johnny Winter's or Roy Rodger's slide technique?

How about Al DiMeola and John McLaughlin and Paco De Lucia doing "Mediteranean Sundance"?

Not to mention whole scads of jazz players. I won't even go into the technique displayed by classical guitarists.
#23
Quote by BadBanshee
Or someone who can play lead and rhythm at the same time where the lead isn't something super fast but to play both at same time is difficult (although I guess such a tune would be finger picked).


For that I'd suggest Ian D'sa from Billy Talent. Nothing mindblowingly fast but he's a master of the drop d tuning. He uses the tuning creatively to incorporate melodies with rhyhm.
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#25
Quote by Heat-13


I personaly judge music by value of composition rather then complexity... if that makes sence. It either sounds good or it doesnt regardless of techniques and tools used to achive it. Advanced techniques ar eonly a tool after all...



Same here, but the dilemma comes into existence when I am sat in my bedroom with my electric guitar and I wanna reproduce something amazing. At that point, the importance of composition sadly deflates a little, at least when it comes to the composition of the different elements of the song such as the instruments. With no drummer or 2nd guitarist around to help reproduce a brilliant composition, I have to rely on something a bit more complex in order to avoid getting bored.
#27
Steffen Schackinger, I'd say he's a quite amazing guitarist without relying on shredding.
#28
Quote by BadBanshee
Or someone who can play lead and rhythm at the same time

Wilko Johnson of Dr Feelgood maybe? Not super complex but very good at playing what could be 2 different parts.
#29
Quote by BadBanshee
Same here, but the dilemma comes into existence when I am sat in my bedroom with my electric guitar and I wanna reproduce something amazing. At that point, the importance of composition sadly deflates a little, at least when it comes to the composition of the different elements of the song such as the instruments. With no drummer or 2nd guitarist around to help reproduce a brilliant composition, I have to rely on something a bit more complex in order to avoid getting bored.



Ah yeah i get that a lot. I think everyone should learn how to play mor ecomplex stuff... afterall the more tools you got the better your work can potentially be. I was however more on about playing in a band or producing a record...

Like yeah playing complex stuff ist jusgt damn fun if youre by yourself :P
#30
Classical and jazz guitarists are pretty nuts. Prog rock guitarists can play some crazy stuff at times.
#31
STEVE LUKATHER!!!

The guy can play anything in any style/genre

He has awesome technique, thats why he's the best session guitarist ever to live
#32
Quote by TextOnTheScreen
Why does it matter if it's acoustic or electric?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KNGafGBTC7A

This is some fantastic guitar technique, and ruling it out because it's acoustic if unfair. If anything, it counts more because of the limitations that acoustic guitars give.

Also, Rob mother****ing Scallon.


What kind of question is that? I'm not saying it doesn't take talent to play acoustic guitar. They might be both guitars but they're effectively different instruments. It matters that it has to be electric because I'm interested in the aspects of electric guitar that you don't get with acoustic guitar, such as feedback and that attacky twang you get when you strike an electric guitar string hard, among other things.
#33
Quote by deadlydictator
oh yea and to the guy saying metalheads cant do slap bass has clearly never heard of alex webster. that mofo is the best slap bassist ive ever heard of.



I didn't say slap bass, I said slap guitar, as in, take a metal guitar player, yknow, the one with 6 strings, and ask him to play slap guitar. I can do it a little, but it definitely is not something that is very widely used in metal. A ton of techniques are left out of metal guitar playing

EDIT: Country guitarists such as Brad Paisley can massacre a fretboard.
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Last edited by dementiacaptain at Mar 30, 2012,
#35
Quote by dementiacaptain
I am a metalhead, and I find that metal is one of the EASIEST music styles to play shred is easy, try taking some death metal guitarist and asking him to play slap guitar. It has already been mentioned, but Guthrie Govan is a fantastic player, and if you consider his stuff typical shred then I would say you are overgeneralizing. I can't play Jazz (of fusion for that matter) to save my life... I think that most metal gets off on the cheap stuff, most metalheads are just scale shredders (myself included) who kind of lose a bit of the musicality that Jazz or learned blues guitarist are so proficient with.


I do regard Guthrie Govan as shred, yes. Just listened to one of his songs someone posted on here are also youtubed Wonderful Slippery Thing (lol). Anything where the focus is on melody and playing that melody fast is shred to me. There are a few parts Guthrie Govan plays which are repeated, (choruses if you can call them that) where there is more rhythm. I guess what I'm looking for is lead guitar with a heavy rhythm throughout.

Something to give you an idea: Dream Theatre - Pull me under. Obviously the beginning riff is easy to play but as you go along it gets more challenging and yet Petrucci is commanding a very hard hitting rhythm throughout. Something you can bang your head to.
Last edited by BadBanshee at Mar 30, 2012,
#37
funk is just as rhythmicly and technically demanding as metal. It can take a lot of stamina and energy.

Jazz takes a very advanced knowledge of the fretboard, theory, rhythm, improvisation and feeling.

Some metal is easy peasy.

But what I must say is, a great guitar player is not judged on how hard there stuff is to play, its judged on how great it sounds, the feeling that is in it and how greatly they perform.

I have heard some truly awful solos over loaded with to much difficult stuff.

I suggest the TS broadens their musical horizon.
#38
Not true at all. The way metal guitarists play may be the flashiest and most obvious in techniques, but by no means is it the most difficult. A lot of other styles are just as difficult, if not more so, but the difficulty is more subtle and tasteful.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#40
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guthrie govan has an amazing sense of phrase shaping


What do you mean exactly?