Page 3 of 7
#81
I play an Ibanez RG. Would that limit me if I tried to play Jazz?


Hehe. I get away with playing jazz on an Ibanez Jem w/10's. For a more traditional jazz sound, it helps to roll back that tone knob, or back off the treble on the amp, or favor the neck pickup, or some combination of such things.

I don't think it would limit you. It's simply something that's a bit different than the norm.
#82
Quote by BadBanshee
Not sure what you mean tbh. Their songs seem technical to me. They sound like a lot of thought have gone into them. Do you disagree?


I think that they're trying to be technical, and certainly put thought into it, but it often sounds like they don't really know what they are doing from a music theory perspective. Mischa's guitarworld interview was quite revealing in this way, in which he more or less admits that he doesn't know what he's doing. Like a metalhead who appriciates Allan Holdsworth but has no clue where to start to get into that kind of thing, and attempts a dubious immitation from a guitaristic perspective.

The technical aspect of the group mostly seems to be a matter of trying to play syncopated parts with non-normal timing, or sometimes with odd time signatures. And using patterns of notes that don't jibe with normal scales. But something about it all comes off as pretty crude to me - like they just put together a series of fret shapes or patterns, as a shot in the dark, to produce something that sounds "different" or "outside", but with little real musical understanding behind it.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Mar 31, 2012,
#83
Ved Buens Ende are a pretty good example of non-shred metal that still contains interesting instrumental work.

http://youtu.be/Kuu_bb45kJI
Marching in this labyrinth village
Troll-king claims his maverick throne
Wretching in his cavernous castle
Chewing on flesh, gnawing on bones!
#84
TLDR as far as most posts so sorry if it's a repeat:

Sounds like you need an intro to great rock and roll! Check out Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Black Sabbath (it's rock, trust me... purists aside ) after all Iommi did some awsome stuff with Fluff and then turns around with awesome stuff like planet caravan! If that's not rock that blows you away with the skill required, then you sir are not looking for blow your mind rock that's harder to play than the usual Oasis stuff... If that doesn't do it, and you want something that challenges you... stick with metal and classical.... er neo-classical .

Not to be an a**-hat, but come on. Rock isn't about technical ability. It's "blow your mind" attribute comes from the sounds produced, not the speed or how hard something is to play. that said, there are some incredibly hard things to learn in the early rock and stuff (like Clapton or Hendrix ).
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#85
I hate it when people try to classify different genres of guitar by use of "technique" or judging how "technical" they are. That is an extremely vague term to me. Does someone have better technique because their fingers are more dexterous? Or does one display better technique because of their knowledge of when and how to execute certain 'maneuvers', if you will?

That kind of thing has to be defined, in my opinion. If you were to ask me, a metal guitarist will likely need to have more accuracy and speed in the fingers. A blues player has to have a lot of tricks in his bag to keep the show interesting.

I just really hate the use of the word "technical" in music terms. At least when it's used to describe a player or style, anyway. Pet peeve.

So now, to be more on topic--you have to define for yourself what a talented musician is before you search for one. If you think that only metal guitarists are capable of technical playing, then you may be looking at things in a close-minded sense, and need to expand a bit. The same goes for the opposite.

Personally, as per my influences (David Gilmour's a big one), I tend to gravitate toward players who I think feel and sound very emotive. Metal doesn't do it for me. To me, blues and blues-based rock are more, dare I say, "technical", because of their use of different... well, techniques. Metal guitar doesn't offer that same vibe for me.
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Last edited by eGraham at Apr 1, 2012,
#86
Incubus' Mike Einziger, Joe Bonamassa, Duane Allman, Derek Trucks, these guys are legends and rarely touch metal

P.S: Metal, as much as I love it, can be soulless from time to time. Plus it gets boring. Whereas these guys are innovative to the max. Dunno, I love playing both metal and non-metal and I feel both have their pros and cons
Last edited by Dopemgs at Apr 1, 2012,
#87
Quote by Brainpolice2
I think that they're trying to be technical, and certainly put thought into it, but it often sounds like they don't really know what they are doing from a music theory perspective. Mischa's guitarworld interview was quite revealing in this way, in which he more or less admits that he doesn't know what he's doing. Like a metalhead who appriciates Allan Holdsworth but has no clue where to start to get into that kind of thing, and attempts a dubious immitation from a guitaristic perspective.

The technical aspect of the group mostly seems to be a matter of trying to play syncopated parts with non-normal timing, or sometimes with odd time signatures. And using patterns of notes that don't jibe with normal scales. But something about it all comes off as pretty crude to me - like they just put together a series of fret shapes or patterns, as a shot in the dark, to produce something that sounds "different" or "outside", but with little real musical understanding behind it.


That pretty much sums up most Jazz, in my view. They'll play something "different" and by the time I want to ask "ok so what was the point?" they've already played yet another different but equally pointless bar.

Mansoor doesn't have to know the music theory behind his songs in order to be a good musician. I think ur confusing spontaneity with ignorance. All creative music begins with spontaneity. There isn't a musician in the world who "calculates" what the next note should be. If they did then I suspect all their music would sound the same.
#88
Quote by BadBanshee
Not sure what you mean tbh. Their songs seem technical to me. They sound like a lot of thought have gone into them. Do you disagree?


It just seemed like you were trying to say that Periphery must be a fairly technical band because you and your mate like them. I mean I love Venom and Celtic Frost but that doesn't mean I think the members of either band should be appearing on anyone's list of top class players.

I don't really know if I know about music theory to judge Periphery's technical prowess.
.
#89
From the looks of the thread the answer seems pretty straightforward.

There are hundreds of great non-metal guitarists out there, however the problem appears to be your definition of "talented" - if a guitarist isn't demonstrating the same techniques and style as a metal guitarist then they don't seem to fit your own personal ideals.


Quote by BadBanshee
...Something to give you an idea: Dream Theatre - Pull me under. Obviously the beginning riff is easy to play but as you go along it gets more challenging and yet Petrucci is commanding a very hard hitting rhythm throughout. Something you can bang your head to.


That means this is going to be a fruitless search, you're going to struggle finding a non-metal guitarist that "excites" you because the simple fact of the matter is - you like metal! I really can't be bothered with microgenres, that's for kids with OCD, so I'd class Petrucci as a metal guitarist in the wider scheme of things, yet you cite him as an example of one of the "non-metal" guitarists you want to discover - that statement would certainly suggest that your focus is far too narrow.

For what it's worth, George Benson and Albert Lee are both shit-hot at what they do.
Actually called Mark!

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#90
Quote by Nietsche
It just seemed like you were trying to say that Periphery must be a fairly technical band because you and your mate like them. I mean I love Venom and Celtic Frost but that doesn't mean I think the members of either band should be appearing on anyone's list of top class players.

I don't really know if I know about music theory to judge Periphery's technical prowess.


I like some of their songs but I don't listen to them. You only have to look to a few posts ago to see that I'm perfectly capable of differentiating between music that involves great skill and music that I like, ala Pixies.
#91
Quote by steven seagull
From the looks of the thread the answer seems pretty straightforward.

There are hundreds of great non-metal guitarists out there, however the problem appears to be your definition of "talented" - if a guitarist isn't demonstrating the same techniques and style as a metal guitarist then they don't seem to fit your own personal ideals.


That means this is going to be a fruitless search, you're going to struggle finding a non-metal guitarist that "excites" you because the simple fact of the matter is - you like metal! I really can't be bothered with microgenres, that's for kids with OCD, so I'd class Petrucci as a metal guitarist in the wider scheme of things, yet you cite him as an example of one of the "non-metal" guitarists you want to discover - that statement would certainly suggest that your focus is far too narrow.

For what it's worth, George Benson and Albert Lee are both shit-hot at what they do.


Well I was going to say "move your head to" but realized that didn't narrow it down at all. I don't mean moshpit style headbanging with long hair. I'm just talking about a reasonably hard hitting rock rhythm.
#92
Quote by Outside Octaves
TLDR as far as most posts so sorry if it's a repeat:

Sounds like you need an intro to great rock and roll! Check out Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Black Sabbath (it's rock, trust me... purists aside ) after all Iommi did some awsome stuff with Fluff and then turns around with awesome stuff like planet caravan! If that's not rock that blows you away with the skill required, then you sir are not looking for blow your mind rock that's harder to play than the usual Oasis stuff... If that doesn't do it, and you want something that challenges you... stick with metal and classical.... er neo-classical .

Not to be an a**-hat, but come on. Rock isn't about technical ability. It's "blow your mind" attribute comes from the sounds produced, not the speed or how hard something is to play. that said, there are some incredibly hard things to learn in the early rock and stuff (like Clapton or Hendrix ).


I can't find a Clapton song that I like and I once tried learning purple rain but got bored lol. Might give it another go though. Any suggestions?
#93
Quote by BadBanshee
Well I was going to say "move your head to" but realized that didn't narrow it down at all. I don't mean moshpit style headbanging with long hair. I'm just talking about a reasonably hard hitting rock rhythm.

That's still a very narrow set of criteria that's going to exclude a lot of artists - you seem to have a very particular idea in your head of what you're hoping to find, and that's going to make it a struggle because you're automatically dismissing a massive chunk of music.

To me your question reads like "I want to discover some new, exciting non-metal guitarists...but they have to play the same kind of stuff that metal guitarists play". You keep alluding to the kind of stuff you want to hear, and it's all stuff that basically defines metal - fast, technical, hard-hitting etc. Don't misunderstand me, I'm not saying you're an arsehole or anything like that, but you seem to have already decided, consciously or subconsciously, what it is you want to hear. That being the case, it's likely that you'll effectively reject most of the artists people suggest by virtue of them not meeting your definition of "talented".
Actually called Mark!

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#94
Quote by steven seagull
That's still a very narrow set of criteria that's going to exclude a lot of artists - you seem to have a very particular idea in your head of what you're hoping to find, and that's going to make it a struggle because you're automatically dismissing a massive chunk of music.

To me your question reads like "I want to discover some new, exciting non-metal guitarists...but they have to play the same kind of stuff that metal guitarists play". You keep alluding to the kind of stuff you want to hear, and it's all stuff that basically defines metal - fast, technical, hard-hitting etc. Don't misunderstand me, I'm not saying you're an arsehole or anything like that, but you seem to have already decided, consciously or subconsciously, what it is you want to hear. That being the case, it's likely that you'll effectively reject most of the artists people suggest by virtue of them not meeting your definition of "talented".


It's not that they don't meet my definition of talented, it's just that they're not exactly listenable to more than once, imv. Tbh, I don't like listening to music that fits nicely into a particular style. Someone suggested the guitarist out of Billy Talent so I tried learning Fallen Leaves by them, which was kinda fun, and the song is good for its kind, but it was very typically punk pop. You might think it's judgmental of me but I think it may just be I have one ****ed up style (my best mates and my sister thinks that of me).

Another example, Steffen Schakinger, just fits too nice and snuggly into that ballad guitar style that Satriani and Vai employ. There's nothing badass about him. Still very good though.

The suggestion from this thread that has stood out the most for me is Rory Gallagher. Just need to dig deeper and try learn one of his songs.

Just wanna say, metal is certainly not my chosen genre. Yes, I'm a big fan of Metallica and System of a Down, and I listen to Dream Theatre and Disturbed. What other metal bands do I listen to... occasionally Rob Zombie but that's stretching it. But there are many metal bands out there I've given a chance and just can't get into it, e.g. Trivium (although some of their songs are nice), Machine Head, Megadeth, Lamb of God, Periphery, Born of Osiris, Slipknot. I want to play some really challenging feel good leads, and I often find them in metal music, but metal music in general isn't who I am.
#95
Hmm, if Rory Gallagher is ticking boxes then might be worth checking out some of John Sykes's stuff.
Actually called Mark!

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#97
I want to play some really challenging feel good leads, and I often find them in metal music, but metal music in general isn't who I am.


By the standards of technicality and musicality that I'm aware of, most of the hottest current guitarists (full of "challenging leads") gravitate toward some kind of jazz-fusion thing, or an instrumental progressive-rock thing, or at least blatantly are not just playing metal (they are multi-genre players and cross-over artists). There is often an ecclectic element. There are actually quite a few brilliant guitarists who come from country/bluegrass and blues backgrounds as well.

Versatility is a factor in talent (this feeds into why players like Govan are so popular). As is the overall musical mind of the guitarist.

Metal isn't inherently bad (I just think it's culturally oversaturated with amatuer "technicalists" and norms of speed without depth/musicality and so focused on releasing bottled up macho youthful male aggression that the testosterone diminishes musical coherance and intelligence), but you should treat it as just another musical well to potentially draw from, insofar as the desire is there.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Apr 1, 2012,
#98
I'm with the guy who said Joe Pass. Plus, it's improvisational.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SbaODlgvWFc&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0SSfVhbDdzc&feature=relmfu

And to dementiacaptain, it's great to hear your humility. If you find a good teacher and practice improvising, learn theory, especially relating the ideas to how they actually sound, I'm sure you could be a great jazz guitarist. If of course you enjoy playing jazz, otherwise just have fun
Last edited by s guy at Apr 1, 2012,
#99
Quote by BadBanshee

The suggestion from this thread that has stood out the most for me is Rory Gallagher. Just need to dig deeper and try learn one of his songs.
.



Check out Gary Moore, especially his earlier stuff. It doesn't get any ballsier than that.
#101
Quote by BadBanshee
At least if he played half the notes wrong, nobody would realize. He probably did for all I know.


Its jazz, there are no wrong notes.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#102
Brainpolice2:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1530286

Quote by AskingAlexander
My band sounds nothing like Asking Alexandria, we're more like Misery Signals and BTBAM.. We do lots of sweeps, complex time signatures and jazz-influenced breakdowns combined with uplifting melodic segements. We're pretty progressive and technical actually.

Quote by AskingAlexander
No. I've been playing guitar for 11 years, I am classically trained


You are a visionary.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

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#103
Quote by BadBanshee
That pretty much sums up most Jazz, in my view. They'll play something "different" and by the time I want to ask "ok so what was the point?" they've already played yet another different but equally pointless bar.

Mansoor doesn't have to know the music theory behind his songs in order to be a good musician. I think ur confusing spontaneity with ignorance. All creative music begins with spontaneity. There isn't a musician in the world who "calculates" what the next note should be. If they did then I suspect all their music would sound the same.

Wow, you have a convoluted and completely wrong understanding of what Jazz is.

Congrats.
#104
Quote by rhino1957
Joe bonamassa could be a good start. And maybe some Alex lifeson and Joe satriani.


Yes! Joe bonamassa is AMAZING!
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No.


Well, technically it could be done, but only in the same way that you could change a cat into a hamburger. It's an unpleasant process, and nobody is happy with the result.
#105
If someone needs the tabs to find out if a song is technical or boring... then I don't know. I thought others may have picked up on it, but clearly not. At least it was something long to read with lots of differing opinions.

Half the guitarists mentioned here I don't even know, so I can't even say if they were a good choice or a bad choice. One likes Rory and another suggests John Sykes - now Sykes is an awesome player. And to me, he definitely did more than Vai in the one situation... But he will still be what the guy is not looking for. But it's still someone good to listen to. Petrucci had lost the point by Systematic Chaos... so pukeworthy he had become. But his latest offering with DT returned to roots and is once more listenable as a dramatic turn of events it was. Mike Stern will take a Slayer tune at 220bpm and swing those 16ths - thats cos he's cool like that.

Tab will kill you in the long run. Rather figure it out by ear. And truthfully, there won't be anything "easy" with any guitarist/musician. At some point in time they will all manage to write something truly difficult (unless they shot their heads off and weren't able to write anymore). I would like to recommend one track, The Hellecasters - King Arthur's Dream. You're allowed to use tab if you wish. Listening to it, it is so beautiful - playing it, well, see for yourself. Brilliant use of space/phrasing/chord choice/etc. Jerry Donahue the mofo.

In essence, his movements are easily understandable - the execution of everything else just devastates you for life. But, this is only my opinion (amongst a thread of others). Jeff Beck is also truly phenomenal. One of my all time faves. Richie Kotzen takes his soul grooves and blends it with rock - while keeping some of his super technique for here and there. As for Bonamassa, why didn't he just keep Bloodline going - he ruined a good thing. His stuff outside of the lonely Bloodline album just sucks - to me at least. Too much wankage.

I have to agree with the metal guitarist thing. Some are real good, some just aren't. In the end it's songwriting that makes them or break them. That would be up to you how to see them. So who knows, maybe you find something to latch onto in all these posts. Maybe you don't. Your quest for a musician to latch onto is a very personal one in the end. No matter what other people say, you have your own ideas and really need your own ideas in finding that one needle in the haystack. The reasons will be your own so be warned its a long and lonely journey. Pack a lunch.
#106
Quote by evolucian
If someone needs the tabs to find out if a song is technical or boring... then I don't know. I thought others may have picked up on it, but clearly not. At least it was something long to read with lots of differing opinions.

Half the guitarists mentioned here I don't even know, so I can't even say if they were a good choice or a bad choice. One likes Rory and another suggests John Sykes - now Sykes is an awesome player. And to me, he definitely did more than Vai in the one situation... But he will still be what the guy is not looking for. But it's still someone good to listen to. Petrucci had lost the point by Systematic Chaos... so pukeworthy he had become. But his latest offering with DT returned to roots and is once more listenable as a dramatic turn of events it was. Mike Stern will take a Slayer tune at 220bpm and swing those 16ths - thats cos he's cool like that.

Tab will kill you in the long run. Rather figure it out by ear. And truthfully, there won't be anything "easy" with any guitarist/musician. At some point in time they will all manage to write something truly difficult (unless they shot their heads off and weren't able to write anymore). I would like to recommend one track, The Hellecasters - King Arthur's Dream. You're allowed to use tab if you wish. Listening to it, it is so beautiful - playing it, well, see for yourself. Brilliant use of space/phrasing/chord choice/etc. Jerry Donahue the mofo.

In essence, his movements are easily understandable - the execution of everything else just devastates you for life. But, this is only my opinion (amongst a thread of others). Jeff Beck is also truly phenomenal. One of my all time faves. Richie Kotzen takes his soul grooves and blends it with rock - while keeping some of his super technique for here and there. As for Bonamassa, why didn't he just keep Bloodline going - he ruined a good thing. His stuff outside of the lonely Bloodline album just sucks - to me at least. Too much wankage.

I have to agree with the metal guitarist thing. Some are real good, some just aren't. In the end it's songwriting that makes them or break them. That would be up to you how to see them. So who knows, maybe you find something to latch onto in all these posts. Maybe you don't. Your quest for a musician to latch onto is a very personal one in the end. No matter what other people say, you have your own ideas and really need your own ideas in finding that one needle in the haystack. The reasons will be your own so be warned its a long and lonely journey. Pack a lunch.


Figure it out by ear instead of using tab? Is that some kind of sick joke? Seriously though why waste so much time?

I guess that's one thing I'm surprised about, (it's probably an issue of human psychology), that it IS a needle in a haystack. I thought it would be more a case of plenty of fish. I've gone through so many youtube videos, part of me is contemplating that I've only heard but not truly listened to all these artists. All these artists must be big for a reason right? I wish the reason I didn't love them was because of some internal barrier that I could destroy. It seems like a waste of talent. And I'm sure there are people out there who love whatever anybody plays to them.

At least I'm open in the sense that I have favourite songs spanning a very wide distance in the genre-scape, but I don't find myself having a favourite genre where I would love listening to just about every single song in that genre no matter what. I've seen some people do that.

Why would you say John Sykes isn't who I am looking for? You're probably right but what's your reasoning? I listened to Tygers of Pan Tang and the stuff he did with Thin Lizzy and... it was ok.

Just listened to King Arthur's Dream, and that's what you call a memorable tune! For all the nuances it contains like the ones you've mentioned. Is it 1 or 2 guitars playing that melody? If it's one it's probably finger picked right?

Really feeling Richi Kotzen's You Can't Save Me atm.
#107
Quote by chronowarp
Wow, you have a convoluted and completely wrong understanding of what Jazz is.


+1
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#108
Figure it out by ear instead of using tab? Is that some kind of sick joke? Seriously though why waste so much time?


Because having good ears is immensely useful in every aspect of musicianship? Seriously, the most important skill for anyone outside of classical performers - and still really useful if you're a classical performer.
#109
Quote by BadBanshee
How does everyone else feel? I hope I am deeply wrong and that you guys will tell me about a non-metal guitarist whose tabs I WILL get excited about.


This is the line that evolucian picked up on - now admittedly he might be being overlyu picky about semantics but I see can see where he's coming from which is this...

why do their tabs matter - what bearing does a transcription have on whether or not you're going to enjoy listening to, or playing, their music? He's absolutely right that you shouldn't have to look at a tab to decide if their music is exciting or whether or not you're going to like it, you only need to listen - i'm not convinced that was what you intended to say though.
Actually called Mark!

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#110
Quote by BadBanshee


Anyway, I have no idea at all when it comes to Jazz, can anyone suggest me an easy enough piece for electric guitar, something accessible to someone who usually plays rock/metal, but something that will keep me interested, not too easy to play, and importantly something that has a good guitar pro tab of it?


I'm not too clued up on jazz myself, but John Scofield is always a good place to start, he plays with a good groove and some bite, quite a few of his songs revolve around the same chord as well, so they are a bit easier to solo over when compared to other jazz tunes with chord changes all over the place.
WHOMP

Think of that next time you are not allowed to laugh.
#111
Quote by theknuckster
Jazz, surely? I mean some of Joe Pass' stuff sounds almost simple when you first listen to it, but the ridiculous fluidity of chord changes is definitely a taxing technical feat.


THANK you! I was waiting for this... Listen to a handful of Jazz artists. A lot of the "best guitarists" that play metal and have such intricate work/technique. Think about it, metal is a genre formed widely around the pentatonic scale....

How many jazz scales can ya play and play well? Bet they're a hell of a lot harder than the penta... Plus all the funky time sig's in Jazz...

Sofield and Pass are good places to start.
#112
Quote by steven seagull
This is the line that evolucian picked up on - now admittedly he might be being overlyu picky about semantics but I see can see where he's coming from which is this...

why do their tabs matter - what bearing does a transcription have on whether or not you're going to enjoy listening to, or playing, their music? He's absolutely right that you shouldn't have to look at a tab to decide if their music is exciting or whether or not you're going to like it, you only need to listen - i'm not convinced that was what you intended to say though.


Ah I can see the possible confusion there. All I meant was exciting to play. I said tabs cuz I usually only try to play an artist's music if I can find a tab of it. Part of what makes something exciting for me to play is something that is 1. To my taste (i try to be open) 2. physically taxing to learn 3. Isn't just a short riff but a whole section with it's own soul and ability to tell a compelling story. Instrumental guitar music tends to fulfil 2 and 3 every time but sometimes just doesn't fulfil 1.
#113
Quote by Deven_D
THANK you! I was waiting for this... Listen to a handful of Jazz artists. A lot of the "best guitarists" that play metal and have such intricate work/technique. Think about it, metal is a genre formed widely around the pentatonic scale....

How many jazz scales can ya play and play well? Bet they're a hell of a lot harder than the penta... Plus all the funky time sig's in Jazz...

Sofield and Pass are good places to start.


I can play one shape each of penta, major and minor. I don't really practise them tho. Do you? I can see a point to an extent I guess but can learning loads of dif shapes of dif scales improve ur guitar playing proficiency? And how?
#114
Someone should make a thread about stuff every versatile guitarist should practise every day.
#116
+1

and also, add ear training to that list
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#118
Quote by chronowarp
Wow, you have a convoluted and completely wrong understanding of what Jazz is.

Congrats.


Sorry, what I meant was: most of the guitar based jazz that you find people posting youtube links to in this thread. Convoluted is actually quite a good word to use to describe that kind of jazz, imv. However, credit where credit is due, it does look and sound like it takes a massive amount of technical skill and stamina.

I'll now post a youtube link to the kind of jazz I DO like and no prizes for guessing that this is a type of jazz radically different to the type that UG's brand of jazz listeners enjoy. I wouldn't be surprised if they said it wasn't "real" jazz:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wgYgl4OodeY
#119
Who would call Louis Armstrong "not Jazz"? UHHH. Louis Armstrong is the grandfather of Jazz and the same stuff he's playing here in integral and central to the melodic vocabulary of Jazz.

Saying shit like "jazz sounds convoluted" or "if he played a wrong note nobody would notice" is a very clear demonstration of your lack of ear training, musical sensibility, and diversity as a musician.

Basically, you need to understand that you don't understand.
Last edited by chronowarp at Apr 2, 2012,
#120
CBA to go through 6 pages of answers, but +1 to Andy Timmins if he was already mentioned. he's a great player, specifically give Electric Gypsy a listen