#1
i have been playing for about a year and a half now as far as theory i been just teaching myself with online media know my basic major, minor and their respected 5 note pent shapes and know why each are constructed the way they are know my intervals how to harmonize each one of those scales can make progressions from them etc etc know my basic triads augmented,7th,9th,diminished, and your simple minor and major 1 3 5 ones.

What i want to find out is were i am really at in just coming up with music off the top of my head with all this stuff i have learned from people in this forum that i consider more then adept to judge me.

What can u hear in my playing that i should work on specifically to become a good or even decent improviser only been playing a year and half and i hear all these other dudes at my time of playing just shredding it up and down the neck while i am just like la la lalalala laaaa kind of just boring. I hear all these great phrases in my head but dont have the technique to play them so instead of playing that in the moment ill settle for something simpler so i dont sound like a jackass or just a partial jackass lol.

here is a improv i did over a backing track online a little while back but its my most recent recording so at the time i been playing for about a year not much improvement these last 5 months in the way of improv thats why i am asking for advice. The ending is a little rough at 3:40 i try to practice my tremolo picking in a practical way lol. At 2:44 to 2:50 i feel is my best phrase i do not know how i came up with it in the moment but i was just thinking how can i lead on to a flat 7 in a minor scale and make it sound cool just be patient and listen to it through thanks. http://snd.sc/GXSif6
#2
keep practicing what you're doing. If you focus on playing melodically speed will come with time, if you focus on playing fast then you'll just end up wanking. You also get to learn how certain notes sound when played out of context while playing slow (accidentally playing outside of whatever key you have decided the song is in). Better to solo than to shred.
#3
Speed in one of those things which comes with practice. Practice your scales with a metronome, and gradually ramp up the speed. Make sure you're playing it clean. If you keep practicing your speed will get better.

However, the real secret to being a good improviser is being able to think in music. When most guitarists start they play physically - they're thinking about where they can move their fingers on the fretboard. Sometimes after that they start to play intellectually "Oh, I'd like to go to the flat 7, maybe I can walk down the scale to get there" which isn't really an improvement. It sounds to me like you're probably stuck in this area.

Where you want to be, as an improviser, is at a place where you imagine a sound and play it. You're thinking in sounds, and your hands are automatically giving you the sounds that are in your brain. To imagine this process, try improvising by singing - you probably don't think about how to adjust your throat to get the notes you want, and you probably don't think about tonics and minor thirds ... you just sing. You want to get to the same place on your guitar.

The key to making that leap is ear training. Ear training is about developing the link between your ears, mind, and hands so that you can play the sounds you think and hear. I strongly recommend making a point to add some ear-training specific study to your practice schedule. Download the functional ear trainer from miles.be, and get a good book on ear training (I recommend Wyatt et al's "Ear Training for the Contemporary Musician").
#4
Awesome hotsplur that is exactly were I am at I meen I do have some prenotions of what the next note will sound like or just areas on the fretboard I like that I know will sound good with a particular phrase I Am about to do. But it's still a very trapped feeling I get when I play, ear training might just be the thing I need to add in to my theory, technique practice to come full circle eventually. Btw just downloaded that free program it's freakin awesome

One question about it though in the beginning of the first few examples they say a cadence is being played does that imply a 1 4 5 progression in whatever key they are referring to?.
#5
Quote by Fourfourforever

One question about it though in the beginning of the first few examples they say a cadence is being played does that imply a 1 4 5 progression in whatever key they are referring to?.


Don't worry about that. When your ear is good enough to recognize those chords, you'll recognize the chords. The final chord of the sequence is the 1, but other than that ... it's not that important yet.

(The book I recommended will teach you a lot of useful theory, too, in passing).
#6
Yea true I would know if my ear was good enough lol I might have to get this book might pick up rock discipline by John for the hell of it also.
#9
beef up your chops as well - so you can play literally anything of a complex nature, then use your well trained ear to play complex stuff out of your head.