#1
I'm looking into getting a custom made Telecaster from these guys,
I've created it on their site, just wanted to hear some feedback from Warmoth owners!
How good is the sound and quality of these guitars?
Just wanna make sure I'm getting what I'm paying for!
Thanks!
#2
I've built two Warmoth guitars. You will pay more for Warmoth bodies and necks than you will for Allparts, Mighty Mite, etc., but it is well worth it. Their workmanship on mine is flawless.
#3
Are they able to put the guitar together for you, or do you just
have to order the parts and do it yourself?
Thanks for the response by the way.
#4
you have to put it together yourswlf, but it no big deal, and plus, it will probably lead you to a better understanding of how a guitar is made...
#7
Quote by Wisthekiller
The paint tends to chip off easy if you don't get a natural finish.


Never experienced or heard of any paint chipping. The finish on mine and the others I've seen personally from Warmoth have had nice, professional paint finishes. I play mine a lot and the paint still looks great. Guess anyone can get a bad one once in a while.
#9
I've built several guitars using Warmoth parts. The finish on all of them has chipped and flaked within the first month. One of them started out being totally white, now the only parts that are still white are the areas under the pickguard and control cavity. Also the ''satin'' nitro they use on their necks rubs glossy within a week of use. Warmoth's base parts are great but their finishes are pretty terrible. That's what you get for trying to have the thickness of a nitro finish but with poly. They either need to thicken their finish (bad) or switch to using nitro (which they claim would largely increase cost, yet many other similar companies use nitro and if anything Warmoth are already more expensive than the others).

Shop around. USACG and Musikraft both make parts on-par with Warmoth (and offer more options, such as set necks and hand-rolled fretboard edges from Musikraft and USACG will do almost anything you ask). Warmoth's main draw is they're the most convenient, since their website is so nicely made. You are paying for that convenience though. I like my Warmoth guitars but for my next build I'm using a mixture of Warmoth (pickguard), USACG (body) and Musikraft (neck).

And don't underestimate how much work it is to put a guitar together from parts. It's very hard to get a good-playing guitar out of it unless you have a good selection of luthier tools. And your first time is going to take a long time and you will make mistakes. Everybody does. I'd advise you look at getting a cheap body and neck from eBay or sites like axesrus and guitarfetish to practise on before you drop the big cash on parts from one of these companies.
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#10
You get what you pay for. Warmoth is no exception. They're generally more expensive than other brands but the quality can be so much better. The best thing with Warmoth is that you're getting exactly the part in the picture. It's very convenient and I really like them for it.

Take into consideration that the works of putting together a guitar might take up to a week or two. That it if the body and neck are pre-finished. Also, it requires that you have a certain amount of tools. Some of them can be quite uncommon.

My lovely Paulcaster which I stained and oil-finished took me a whole month to complete. One week of staining followed by almost three weeks of building up Tru-oil coats. Took me another week to assemble the parts and wire in the electronics all together. A bit time consuming but It was such a joy to do.

Agreed with Mr.Flibble that you should really practice on a cheaper kit first to gain the experience needed for a more expensive project.
G͔͓̅e͎͉̟̽ͬ͐̎̃͐ͨͅå͈͖͕̹̤̟̐̏͋ͅr̩͕̫̰̗s̹̳̼ͥ̒̍̄̅ͥ̚:


ESP Standard Eclipse I CTM VW
ESP LTD Deluxe H-1001
ESP LTD Deluxe Viper-1000 STBC
ESP Edwards E-EX-100STD
Warmoth Paulcaster "Tiger"
Tanglewood TW170 AS
Vox Tonelab ST
Blackstar HT-1R


#11
Just few questioms about Warmoth:
do they drill the holes for strap-locks,bridge,pickguard? Hows their Satin on bodies?
#12
Quote by Elderer
Just few questioms about Warmoth:
do they drill the holes for strap-locks,bridge,pickguard?
They drill the relevant holes for the bridge - they have a list of all the bridges they drill for on their site. If you want a bridge that they don't list then you'll need to drill for it yourself.

They do not drill the holes for the pickguard or straplocks. They also do not drill holes for mounting the jack or other controls, pickup mounting rings, rear control cavity covers, spring claws, tuners or rear trem cover plates.

The only things Warmoth will drill are the four mounting holes on the neck heel and neck pocket and the bridge.

Hows their Satin on bodies?
Same as their neck satin finish. It's a satin nitro. Easy to repair, will yellow and check (thin and crack) after a few years and if it's subject to much rubbing/buffing, it will turn glossy.

If you want a clear satin finish, the best thign is to get a spray can of satin polyurethane. It's dead easy to do a clear satin poly finish and it doesn't have to be that thick. With woods like rock maple, alder, basswood and poplar you often don't even need to fully seal the wood first (though poplar and basswood both look terrible with clear finishes).
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.
#13
Quote by MrFlibble
They drill the relevant holes for the bridge - they have a list of all the bridges they drill for on their site. If you want a bridge that they don't list then you'll need to drill for it yourself.

They do not drill the holes for the pickguard or straplocks. They also do not drill holes for mounting the jack or other controls, pickup mounting rings, rear control cavity covers, spring claws, tuners or rear trem cover plates.

The only things Warmoth will drill are the four mounting holes on the neck heel and neck pocket and the bridge.

Same as their neck satin finish. It's a satin nitro. Easy to repair, will yellow and check (thin and crack) after a few years and if it's subject to much rubbing/buffing, it will turn glossy.

If you want a clear satin finish, the best thign is to get a spray can of satin polyurethane. It's dead easy to do a clear satin poly finish and it doesn't have to be that thick. With woods like rock maple, alder, basswood and poplar you often don't even need to fully seal the wood first (though poplar and basswood both look terrible with clear finishes).


Damn those are bad news. I got no problem with drilling pickguard holes,but jack cavity etc-aint my league.
Im planning Strat-type body. Mahogany base and Koa laminate top.With Satin. I checked USAGC but their offer of choices seem rather poor. Havent looked at that Musikraft yet. Know any other luthiers on par with Warmoth quality and price?
Also I didnt undestand from your post do drill that hole for wires between pickguard and jack plate?
Last edited by Elderer at Apr 1, 2012,
#14
On both my Warmoth builds they drilled the holes for the wiring between the pickguard and jack plate. On my first build, which was several years ago, they did not drill the holes for the spring claw or tremolo posts. On my latest build last year those holes were drilled. You will still have to drill your holes for the pick guard, pickup mounting rings, straplocks, and rear cover plate. The jack cavity on both of mine were also drilled out. From the posts I've read, it would appear that Warmoth is doing more than they used to. The best thing to do would be to call them and talk to a customer service rep and find out exactly what all they will do. Good luck with whatever build you decide to do.
#15
Thanks!
Might be a silly question,but if Im going for hardtail Strat do I need to ground that bridge to pickguard? Im going to take my Squier apart and inspect it and put it back together.
#16
Yes, you still need to ground it if you're using passive pickups. I would ground it to one of the bridge mounting posts. If you're using active pickups, I don't think you need to run a ground wire as I believe they have a built-in ground, but am not 100% sure as I've never installed active pickups.
#17
Quote by gstring120
Yes, you still need to ground it if you're using passive pickups. I would ground it to one of the bridge mounting posts. If you're using active pickups, I don't think you need to run a ground wire as I believe they have a built-in ground, but am not 100% sure as I've never installed active pickups.

Guess my knowneldge ended there. How to ground hardtail as it has no brass block in the body and the whole claw system?
Kinda went off-topic there. Thanks for all the answers!
Last edited by Elderer at Apr 1, 2012,
#18
Quote by Elderer
Damn those are bad news. I got no problem with drilling pickguard holes,but jack cavity etc-aint my league.
Im planning Strat-type body. Mahogany base and Koa laminate top.With Satin. I checked USAGC but their offer of choices seem rather poor. Havent looked at that Musikraft yet. Know any other luthiers on par with Warmoth quality and price?
Also I didnt undestand from your post do drill that hole for wires between pickguard and jack plate?


Check out Carvin. They'll do it all.
#19
You only need to drill screw holes. All the bigger drilling and routing works are done from factory. On my telecaster with tune-o-matic bridge they even drilled the ground wire to the bridge post.

The ground wire should leads to the bridge post or the tremolo claw. Not sure about the active pickups need it but if you follow the wiring schematics it should be fine.
G͔͓̅e͎͉̟̽ͬ͐̎̃͐ͨͅå͈͖͕̹̤̟̐̏͋ͅr̩͕̫̰̗s̹̳̼ͥ̒̍̄̅ͥ̚:


ESP Standard Eclipse I CTM VW
ESP LTD Deluxe H-1001
ESP LTD Deluxe Viper-1000 STBC
ESP Edwards E-EX-100STD
Warmoth Paulcaster "Tiger"
Tanglewood TW170 AS
Vox Tonelab ST
Blackstar HT-1R


#20
Yea, I just got mail from Warmoth. They drill all holes for wires. I dont think Ill have any problems with screw holes,but straplocks seem tricky. So Ill go with Warmoth.
#21
I have a Warmoth Jazz bass that is one of the prettiest basses I have ever owned. Black Korina with a tobacco sunburst. As pretty as the day
I bought it with great matching of woods, As for finish . As we all do have accident s ,happened to drop a 20 lb old syte TV ( tube) from a foot or more
onto the middle of back. Aside for a small indent you would not know it ever happened. Looks like a small imperfection in the wood from the source.
I have worked in cabinet shops off and on for a few years and am very impressed with their product and finishes. Just picked up another that
has a swamp ash back. Surprise to me the swamp as is book matched.. Way to go Warmoth.