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#1
What is everyone's true opinion on the series.

PS: I have a friend that thinks they're amazing.
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#3
You could do worse you could have a fender frontman. Zing
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#4
They are okay for the price, but that is about it. I wouldn't use them for anything serious other than just bedroom practice or something like that.
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#5
There are better amps, but they're fairly good when you're not used to play on full stacks! :P
#6
they're.....bad...if you haven't been playing for very long but you wanna get your feet wet with marshalls and gain and you want a cool red or white, or i think they even do purple now, amp...then thats fine. it's very common to see people have them for just playing with friends or in bedrooms, but they are a far cry from their older brothers and no pro guitarist would go near them. if you want marshall then save your money and get the right ones
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Quote by CaptainAmerican
I would recommend the marshal MG100

Very versatile and quality sound. It should treat you well
#7
My first amp was a 15 watt MG. I thought it was fine when I used it but I was just starting out then. A couple years later, one of the knobs broke off and I got a different amp. 12 years down the road, these days it's clear it really isn't good for anything other than a beginner.
#9
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Damn, why didn't anyone else think about making a thread like this?


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#10
Quote by WtrPlyr
Damn, why didn't anyone else think about making a thread like this?


+1

Truly, the question of our generation.
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#11
Quote by WtrPlyr
Damn, why didn't anyone else think about making a thread like this?

LOL.

Anyway, my first amp was a 30w MG. Horrible amp, especially for the price. The only thing quite as bad around that price is the Line 6 Spider.

It really held me back learning guitar.

So many better options in that price ballpark. Fender Mustangs, Peavey Vypyrs, anything by VOX in that range.

MGs are a total waste of money. They sound so damn muddy-and it's the amp itself, not the speaker. When I disconnect the speaker and hook it up to a tube Marshall head it sounds fine.

But even great multieffects don't sound good through the MG amps. You're really better off with a cheap powered PA speaker (like a Kustom) and a cheap multi-effects than you'd be with anything in the MG line.

Your friend either doesn't have much experience or he's not very discerning.
#13
i thought the MG sounded bad when i still thought my avt sounded good.

...
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
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#14
I can't say I agree with everything that everyone says. I mean, I use the cheapest guitar processors and in studio usually play through marshal MG, and if I tweak both the pedal and amp, then I can get a decent tone out of it. But you really got to know your gear to make it sound well if it's not built to sound well.
#15
Quote by Aralingh
I can't say I agree with everything that everyone says. I mean, I use the cheapest guitar processors and in studio usually play through marshal MG, and if I tweak both the pedal and amp, then I can get a decent tone out of it. But you really got to know your gear to make it sound well if it's not built to sound well.


well that's all well and good, but i just can't agree with the fact that an MG produces quality recording material...kudos to you for making it work for you though
Fender Strat Deluxe
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Roland JC120
Pedals

Quote by CaptainAmerican
I would recommend the marshal MG100

Very versatile and quality sound. It should treat you well
#16
Grass grows. Sun shines. Birds fly. The MG sounds bad.

It's a fact of nature.
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
What the hell is a G&L.



Quote by Flux'D
Gay & Lesbian I think, the box smelled funny
Greg what did you send me??
#17
MGs are terrible if you don't know how to use them. There are some good sounds buried in them (not many though), you just have to work at finding the right settings.

They're solidly built, reliable entry level amps, nothing more than that. Not bad, but not particularly good either.
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Last edited by GaryBillington at Mar 31, 2012,
#18
For the same price you could get a Vypyr, Valvetronix or a Mustang.

'Nuff said.

They are better than Spiders or Frontmans though. So there's that, I guess.
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#19
They're rubbish. It is a crime against natural justice that they bear the Marshall logo.
Gilchrist custom
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#20
I don't like em, they are bland, and the pots get scratchy real quick.
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#21
Quote by Aralingh
I can't say I agree with everything that everyone says. I mean, I use the cheapest guitar processors and in studio usually play through marshal MG, and if I tweak both the pedal and amp, then I can get a decent tone out of it. But you really got to know your gear to make it sound well if it's not built to sound well.


What?

Really, I've spent dozens of hours with every combination of the controls with the 30watt, played through a dialed-in GNX4 and the MG makes it sound muddy. The best I could get it with the controls on the front was about 60% less muddy than with everything at 12 o'clock.

Or does "tweaking the amp" include disconnecting the speaker, hooking up a jack to the speaker leads, and using a different head (like an all-tube Marshall) to drive the speaker?

'Cause I've done that too, and that's the only way I can make the MG sound tolerable. But I'm not going to turn the Master Volume up past 3 with that setup or I'd probably blow the speaker and the head. Why would I do that at all? I've played some really small venues where the management complained about the space the half-stack took up on the stage, and the MG worked fine in that capacity. But I've found I get good enough results just plugging the MFX directly into the PA at places like that, so why bother lugging that around if I can plug into the PA?

Anyway, you shouldn't have to buy another amp that costs 10 times as much and use it to drive your speaker instead of the built-in amp to make your amp sound good.
#22
Bestest amp ever.
Guitars: Fender FSR Standard Strat, Squire Affinity Strat, Epiphone Nighthawk
Amps: Vox AC15C1, Roland Cube 15x, Peavey KB-1
Pedals: Digitech RP355, HD500, Joyo AC-Tone, EHX Soul Food
#23
Quote by kutless999
Bestest amp ever.


Yeah. Actually funny you're posting here right now, given some other circumstances. Are you satisfied with the answers you got on your MFX thru keyboard amp thread?

I just came across it and it cracks me up seeing you post here because before I got my real Marshall amp and before I got my VOX DA5 and an RP-355, I did most of my playing through a GNX4 going through a keyboard amp.

I started out with the MG30DFX, then about 6 months later added a GNX4, and another six months later got some digital drums and a keyboard amp to play them through. Soon I tried hooking up the GNX4 to the keyboard amp, and that's when I realized how crappy the MG was and it started gathering dust.

So for a couple of years the MG sat by the computer accross the house from the rig I was playing on daily. It hurt my progress as a guitarist because the MG sounded so bad that I didn't spend as much time playing to the Guitar Pro tabs with the computer, but rather made printouts and played with the better sounding rig across the house.

Eventually I found a tube halfstack so cheap I couldn't pass it up, and an RP355 and put them in the computer room. My guitar playing took off as I used all the tools with GP to play along with the right timing. I had some trips to take and the MS-2 had broken (and sounded almost as bad as the MG when it did work), so I picked up the VOX DA5 to play on the rode with the RP. Beat the hell out of headphones.

The DA5 and the RP are now in the computer room and get the most play. The tube half-stack gets some action when we play a show where we have to bring our own drums, otherwise we leave the truck & trailer at home and take what fits in the 2-seater. I was using the half-stack for bandd practice, but after A-B ing the stack against the keyboard amp, I've switched back to the keyboard amp. It's easier to control, our volume is way lower, everyone can hear everything better, so we're getting tighter. The tone with the GNX4 going through the tubes is only marginally better than going through a PA/keyboard amp.

As for cutting through the mix with other guitarists, going through the PA direct gets me heard over bassists and drums. It can be hard to hear myself, on stage if there aren't good monitors or if the mix there isn't great. Or it can be hard to hear the vocalist. I've brought along the DA5 to hear ourselves at places with no monitors, but sometimes we get some mic feedback like that. So I just ordered an in-ear monitor system with a receiver for me and another for the vocalist/drummer. Well use that FOH, so that puts me back in control of our monitor mix.

I'm not buying that bit about not being heard in the mix over tube amps. At least not for the audience. For you, it's more about the monitor mix and monitor setup than whether the amps are tube or solid state.

The tube amps can give a false perception of being heard better since those guys could go and participate in the volume wars by creeping their amp volumes up. And the sound guy can mitigate the impact of that to the audience by equalizing volumes on his board. But it's a different dynamic with MFX direct to the PA. You lose control over your stage volume unless you hook up a wedge directly. You can turn yourself up, but if the sound guys turns you back down, you lose it in the monitors too. With the RP-355 or a G3 it's hard to turn yourself up. With the GNX4 you get a volume control for the 2 XLR outs, as well as another for the 2 unbalanced outs (for recording consoles or amps).

I could have explained that better, but it would probably take a lot more words. Let me know what parts seem not to make sense. Bottom line; I'm not 100% sure because I don't play with another 6-string guitarist, but you can definately be heard in the mix with MFX direct to house PA and be heard over drums and bass. I've even drowned out vocals, drums, bass, and keyboards like that once when the sound guy gave my channel too much pre-amp gain on the board.

Maybe they meant don't expect a MFX played through 75watt per channel solid state, 15" 2-way keyboard amp to hold it's own against a cranked 120watt tube half-stack withouth the benefit of getting backed by a strong house PA and good monitor mix. I would agree with that, but it's got nothing to do with the tubes.
#24
I played using a Yamaha SS amp with another guitarist using a Mesa Mark 3. He used to get really shitty with the way I used to just cut through him in the mix like a hot knife through butter.
It was all in the EQ. I wasn't going to tell him how to cut through me - I was the lead guitarist, not him.
Gilchrist custom
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#25
I'll say their cool for a small practice space but if you want any kind of volume or decent tone they don't seem to reach most peoples standards.
*insert witty statement here*
#26
Quote by GaryBillington
MGs are terrible if you don't know how to use them. There are some good sounds buried in them (not many though), you just have to work at finding the right settings.

They're solidly built, reliable entry level amps, nothing more than that. Not bad, but not particularly good either.


How to use a Marshall MG properly:
1. Do not turn it on.
2. Plug your guitar into almost anything else and use it instead.
3. If no other amps available, then just play unplugged.

As for reliability, they aren't as well known to catch on fire as Bugeras (but I have heard of it happening with one MG). And they don't have tubes to fail. But I have heard of people having lots of other problems with them, from scratchy pots to dead channels.
#27
Would they be so bad if they didn't have Marshall written on the front?

I have never really spent anytime with them but I have used the old park amps which I gather they are very similar to? Back in the day they were pretty popular with beginners...

That said, I haven't heard a single good thing about the MG
#28
Marshall MGs are fairly normal-grade over-priced entry-level solid state amps from a company renowned for making high-end TUBE amps. All things considered if they were a car it'd be like if Ferrari had Hyundai bring back the last generation Tiburon, dressed it up in different sheet metal and dancing-horse badges and sold it for $35K. In the same way that the Tiburon is not a bad 'cheap' sports car, it'll never ever be worthy of the Ferrari name the MG is an alright, if overpriced and somewhat unreliable, entry-level amplifier that will never be worthy of the Marshall name.

Frankly I think if a lesser known brand made them (resulting in less buffoons buying it for the name, and a 15% price drop), and their quality was a bit more consistent (they were all good), then it'd be difficult to complain. The MGs, like Line6 Spiders and Fender Frontman, get too much sh!t around here, and impossibly expensive and complicated rigs get too much praise, but ultimately the bad stuff is kinda... bad. And the 'good' depends on what you're after.

Personally I'm not really a fan of the MG mostly because it's overpriced and the Marshall name and styling will fool people. But what do I care, I have and Evil Twin and an ol' silverface Princeton, so I'll never need one.
#29
Quote by RadioMuse
Marshall MGs are fairly normal-grade over-priced entry-level solid state amps from a company renowned for making high-end TUBE amps. All things considered if they were a car it'd be like if Ferrari had Hyundai bring back the last generation Tiburon, dressed it up in different sheet metal and dancing-horse badges and sold it for $35K. In the same way that the Tiburon is not a bad 'cheap' sports car, it'll never ever be worthy of the Ferrari name the MG is an alright, if overpriced and somewhat unreliable, entry-level amplifier that will never be worthy of the Marshall name.

Frankly I think if a lesser known brand made them (resulting in less buffoons buying it for the name, and a 15% price drop), and their quality was a bit more consistent (they were all good), then it'd be difficult to complain. The MGs, like Line6 Spiders and Fender Frontman, get too much sh!t around here, and impossibly expensive and complicated rigs get too much praise, but ultimately the bad stuff is kinda... bad. And the 'good' depends on what you're after.

Personally I'm not really a fan of the MG mostly because it's overpriced and the Marshall name and styling will fool people. But what do I care, I have and Evil Twin and an ol' silverface Princeton, so I'll never need one.

They're OK if you like bad sounding amps. Listen to them blind compared to the better options in their price range and go with what you like.
#30
Quote by zero
Would they be so bad if they didn't have Marshall written on the front?

I have never really spent anytime with them but I have used the old park amps which I gather they are very similar to? Back in the day they were pretty popular with beginners...

That said, I haven't heard a single good thing about the MG


No, they're not like the old Park amps. The old Park amps weren't muddy. Or made in Vietnam.
#31
Quote by RadioMuse
Marshall MGs are fairly normal-grade over-priced entry-level solid state amps from a company renowned for making high-end TUBE amps. All things considered if they were a car it'd be like if Ferrari had Hyundai bring back the last generation Tiburon, dressed it up in different sheet metal and dancing-horse badges and sold it for $35K. In the same way that the Tiburon is not a bad 'cheap' sports car, it'll never ever be worthy of the Ferrari name the MG is an alright, if overpriced and somewhat unreliable, entry-level amplifier that will never be worthy of the Marshall name.


Well put, this is exactly my point... If it was an 'XYZ' brand amp and dropped a little in price to save on Marshall badges would every one still think they're so bad.

Im not saying there not, Im just curious?

Quote by jetwash69
No, they're not like the old Park amps. The old Park amps weren't muddy. Or made in Vietnam.


Right, I had just assumed that Park (SS Park gear from the 90's - not the old tube stuff from the 60's-70's) kinda became the MG.
Last edited by zero at Apr 1, 2012,
#32
Quote by zero
Well put, this is exactly my point... If it was an 'XYZ' brand amp and dropped a little in price to save on Marshall badges would every one still think they're so bad.

Im not saying there not, Im just curious?


I don't think the name has much to do with it, personally. It's just a really crappy amp. The Spider is a worse amp than the MG, and it still gets it's due amount of hate even though Line 6 as a company makes really great professional quality gear.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
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(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
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Line 6 Pod HD500X
#33
Quote by zero
Would they be so bad if they didn't have Marshall written on the front?

I have never really spent anytime with them but I have used the old park amps which I gather they are very similar to? Back in the day they were pretty popular with beginners...

That said, I haven't heard a single good thing about the MG

This pretty much sums it up - if they still used the Park brand for this range of amps (possibly the AVT series as well) and adjusted the price accordingly, they wouldn't get any of the hate they receive now. I'm not saying they'd be recommended as good amps, but they definitely wouldn't be considered as terrible as they are because they have Marshall written on them.
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#35
MGs are pretty much your average beginner's gear.
They don't sound nearly as bad as the bandwagon will have you believe, though they are overpriced. Also, the halfstack is... Well. Let's just say that for the same price you can get a pretty good all-tube combo.
Ceci n'est pas une signature.
#36
MGs are... meh. they are just cheap practice amps that cost a bit too much for what they are, and a large stack version is available which is just a useless waste of space, money and hearing. the tone isn't too bad, it just has a bit of an over-processed sound which isn't really very pleasing on the ears if you're used to using something better.

the only thing i hate about the MGs is all the people who are dumb enough to buy the stacks in the first place defending their bad purchase by being rude to people who don't like them, telling them they either don't know how to use an amp, suck at guitar, or just completely fail at life and should kill themselves. especially on youtube.
Rig Winter 2017:

Fender Jazzmaster/Yamaha SG1000
Boss TU-3, DS-2, CS-3, EHX small stone, Danelectro delay
Laney VC30-112 with G12H30 speaker, or Session Rockette 30 for smaller gigs
Elixir Nanoweb 11-49 strings, Dunlop Jazz III XL picks
Shure SM57 mic in front of the amp
Last edited by Blompcube at Apr 1, 2012,
#37
I think the MGs are ok. The small ones (like 15W) are quite well to play in the bedroom or sth at home, couse my tube amp probably wouldn't even fit in there. So it's ok for practicing at home, but I wouldn't recommend it since there are other amps in the same price range out there that have much more features and sound much much better (Peavey Vypyr for example).

But what I totally don't understand is why people buy Full or Halfstacks of the MGs or why Marshall even produces those.
I'd never play an MG live, so there's no use for those stacks.
#38
Quote by iMokx
But what I totally don't understand is why people buy Full or Halfstacks of the MGs or why Marshall even produces those.
I'd never play an MG live, so there's no use for those stacks.

not only that, you don't even necessarily need a huge stack for playing live. it can help to fill out a large stage, but i find huge cabinets can make the on-stage sound a bit muddy and un-focussed in smaller places. i wouldn't use anything bigger than a 2x12 for the kind of music i play anyway.

edit: yeah, i meant one thing and said another thing.
Rig Winter 2017:

Fender Jazzmaster/Yamaha SG1000
Boss TU-3, DS-2, CS-3, EHX small stone, Danelectro delay
Laney VC30-112 with G12H30 speaker, or Session Rockette 30 for smaller gigs
Elixir Nanoweb 11-49 strings, Dunlop Jazz III XL picks
Shure SM57 mic in front of the amp
Last edited by Blompcube at Apr 1, 2012,
#39
Why do you need a huge stack at huge venues?
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#40
Quote by Cathbard
Why do you need a huge stack at huge venues?

let me rephrase that.
Rig Winter 2017:

Fender Jazzmaster/Yamaha SG1000
Boss TU-3, DS-2, CS-3, EHX small stone, Danelectro delay
Laney VC30-112 with G12H30 speaker, or Session Rockette 30 for smaller gigs
Elixir Nanoweb 11-49 strings, Dunlop Jazz III XL picks
Shure SM57 mic in front of the amp
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