#1
The strings are fine, and it's correctly in tune, but it doesn't sound right when played... at all. My friend told me at one time what was wrong with it, but I forgot what it's called.

Anyone able to help?
#3
Quote by supersac
are you sure its in tune? might need to be intonated
Since this is in the "Acoustic & Classical Guitar Forum", I'm going to give the OP the benefit of doubt, and assume this is an acoustic 12 string.

Take a moment, if you'd be so kind, to explain the intonation procedure for this type of instrument.

Moving on.....
Quote by hansfckyea
The strings are fine, and it's correctly in tune, but it doesn't sound right when played... at all. My friend told me at one time what was wrong with it, but I forgot what it's called.

Anyone able to help?

12 strings are very difficult to tune in general, and first you have to use an electric tuner.

More importantly, because tuners are very sensitive, they're very likely to be picking up the note from the last string you tuned. This isn't a problem with a 6 string, because you can see, right off, the note is from the last string. Not so with a 12. With unison and octave strings in play, you can wind up thinking the string you're tuning is in tune, when it's really the signal from the other unison or octave string that's being displayed.

The moral here is, the tuner has to go "dead" (no signal), completely before you tune the next string.

I find you have to go through a 12 string a couple of times with the tuner and perhaps a bit of a tweak on the unison strings by ear, before they sound as pleasant as they should.

Once you get them "perfectly" in tune, they'll tend to play themselves into tune rather than out. At least I've found that to be true with a decent 12.

Second, (and also very important); 12 strings have widely different string gauges. As a consequence of this, when you fret them, one string of a pair may exhibit more of a pitch change than its partner. The only defense against this is, to have the guitar's action height set where it should be, to minimize the effect.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 31, 2012,
#4
how 'bout we start with... what kinda guitar is it? next one's a biggie... do you remember what your friend said?
#5
Quote by stepchildusmc
how 'bout we start with... what kinda guitar is it? next one's a biggie... do you remember what your friend said?
You didn't like my musings on why a 12 string you think is in tune, may not actually be in tune?

Everything else I've got is way more expensive, and way more depressing.

Unless you count, 12 strings sound way worse than do their 6 string cousins, while the strings are brand new. If there are new strings on the guitar, give it some time.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 31, 2012,
#6
It's fairly easy to check the intonation. With the instrument in tune, playing each string at the 12th fret should produce the same note as the open string, just an octave higher.
If it's sharp or flat, the intonation needs to be adjusted.
First step is to adjust the action. If the action at the saddle (and the 12th fret) is too high, then merely fretting the note will tend to "pull it sharp".

If the action is close and you are still sharp or flat, then the saddle needs to be "compensated" by relieving it in one direction or another. Of course, this can only be done to the width of the saddle.
In severe cases, a new bridge might have to be installed, or a new saddle slot cut.... This can become expensive, especially with a 12 string.
#7
why, the musing amused me as always cranky. it does seem odd that we's giving us no information to help him. i wanna know what i advise him to adjust the truss rod on !!! i do still have fresh memories of the demise of my 12'er.
#8
Quote by stepchildusmc
i wanna know what i advise him to adjust the truss rod on !!!
Well you can't! Simply by virtue of the fact we don't know if he's got a torque wrench that reads to at least 100 Foot pounds of tension....
Quote by stepchildusmc
i do still have fresh memories of the demise of my 12'er.
God knows, I wanna blame Taylor for that, but I'm just not certain of your relative culpability in that sordid affair.......

OP, ignore this post! You may harm or destroy your instrument by employing any of the techniques mentioned within!

Now that we've got the disclaimer out of the way. Have you ever noticed that the liveliest threads are often started by an OP who never returns?
#10
Quote by stepchildusmc
there was NOTHING in the owners manual that said you can't store M-67's in the soundhole!
Problem solved! It's neither you, nor Taylor's fault. The problem is at the Pentagon! I've been asking them for years to provide a miniature, sound hole mounted "Claymore".

With the rash of insurgent hecklers these days, I believe such a device would fill an important gap in our defense arsenal.

Such a shaped charge type of anti personnel mine,would eliminate any threat, yet leave the guitar unscathed.

OK, the strings would take quite a beating, but other than that.....