#1
Been a guitar player for about 2 years on a crappy acoustic guitar, and recently I just got a nice Classical Acoustic-electric guitar.

Being a huge noob to audio and guitar electrics, I was wondering if you could plug in an acoustic electric guitar "through" a computer.

I have a pretty darn good set of a computer speakers - Logitech X-540. 70 Watts 5.1 Speakers, with 5 speakers and a subwoofer.
Pretty famous speakers from Logitech.

I was wondering if I can just use an adapter
(1/4 in. to 3.5mm, such as this - http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=104&cp_id=10429&cs_id=1042903&p_id=7132&seq=1&format=2)

and plug that into a Microphone In Port, and then the Output would be the X-540 Speakers.

Any help for a huge guitar audio noob would be appreciated.
#2
Absolutely. I use to use an adapter like that before I bought an audio interface.
#3
This probably doesn't apply to you if you're playing a classical acoustic, but general-use speakers are awful for distortion. Speakers in a guitar amp have a much more limited frequency range. The high frequencies cut off at a certain point, whereas general-use speakers try to plain as much of the frequency range as possible. For cleans, this isn't really a problem, but distorted sounds will be incredibly harsh and fizzy. As for physically working, that will definitely do the job.
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#4
Quote by tas38
This probably doesn't apply to you if you're playing a classical acoustic, but general-use speakers are awful for distortion. Speakers in a guitar amp have a much more limited frequency range. The high frequencies cut off at a certain point, whereas general-use speakers try to plain as much of the frequency range as possible. For cleans, this isn't really a problem, but distorted sounds will be incredibly harsh and fizzy. As for physically working, that will definitely do the job.

Cabinet emulation, brah.
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#5
Quote by JagerSlushy
Cabinet emulation, brah.


Yeah, if you use a guitar processor. But not going straight into the line-in or mic jack on the computer.

Run it through a VST and it can, too, but then you have latency.
#6
Quote by JagerSlushy
Cabinet emulation, brah.


Maybe I misinterpreted the TS, but I believe he just wanted to go guitar>soundcard>speakers without going through any extra software or a pedal
RG351DX - Bridge Dragonfire Screamer, Mid+Neck Fender Hot Noiseless
Peavey Valveking 112 - Eminence GB128
AMT E1 > Joyo AC Tone > Dan'o EQ > Shimverb > Digidelay
#7
It works, but I highly reccomend that the guitar have an active preamp/active pickups, otherwise theres an impedance mismatch and you loose all your high end.

Get the appropriate 1/4"->1/8" converter, plug it into the mic port and you can then record! And you can go into the windows volume control thing and unmute the microphone for playback and you can play through.
#9
Quote by jetwash69
Yeah, if you use a guitar processor. But not going straight into the line-in or mic jack on the computer.

Run it through a VST and it can, too, but then you have latency.

I use AmpliTube, which is basically a gui for a bunch of vst's. But yeah, an amp vst into a cab simulator with an ASIO plugin and you're good.
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Someone has had too much jager in their slushy. :/
Quote by CL/\SH
First person on UG to be a grammar nazi and use the correct form of "your" in the correct context.

+ 70 virgins to you, my good sir.

Quote by Fassa Albrecht
Girls DO fap...I don't though.