#1
B C C# D# E F# G# A

Also, is there another (faster) way to figure it out rather than process of elimination?
#2
f# blues scale? there aren't really any tricks apart from learning dem scales!
#3
Identify the overall tonality rather than trying to smoosh every single note in a solo or melody together - that'll give you the starting point and overall answer that you want.
#4
Quote by chronowarp
Identify the overall tonality rather than trying to smoosh every single note in a solo or melody together - that'll give you the starting point and overall answer that you want.


This in no way relates to my question

Thanks TC94
#6
Quote by AussiePage
This in no way relates to my question

Thanks TC94

That, in every way, relates to your question.

And TC94 is not really giving the whole picture.

This may be interpreted as an F# minor pentatonic (F# A B C# E) with not only the blues chromatic passing tones (B B# C#), but also diatonic passing tones (G#, D#). With the G# and D#, it can be interpreted as F# dorian with the blues chromatics.

But it doesn't really matter the label. The most important thing to identify is that the B - B# - C# are acting as colors.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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Last edited by Xiaoxi at Apr 2, 2012,
#7
Quote by alexi66691
Chronowarp for president

+1
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#8
Quote by Xiaoxi
That, in every way, relates to your question.

And TC94 is not really giving the whole picture.

This may be interpreted as an F# minor pentatonic (F# A B C# E) with not only the blues chromatic passing tones (B B# C#), but also diatonic passing tones (G#, D#). With the G# and D#, it can be interpreted as F# dorian with the blues chromatics.

But it doesn't really matter the label. The most important thing to identify is that the B - B# - C# are acting as colors.


Could you explain how it relates?
(Not being a smartarse, I just genuinely think he's talking about a different subject.)
#9
Quote by AussiePage
Could you explain how it relates?
(Not being a smartarse, I just genuinely think he's talking about a different subject.)

I'd explain it to you if you weren't such a big meanie.
#10
Quote by chronowarp
I'd explain it to you if you weren't such a big meanie.


"...rather than trying to smoosh every single note in a solo or melody together."
Just doesn't seem to apply to my question.
#11
Quote by AussiePage
Could you explain how it relates?
(Not being a smartarse, I just genuinely think he's talking about a different subject.)


basically when it comes down to it if you figure out the tonality of the melody you can much more easily find notes to hit rather than laying out all the different notes, it will be easier to get into more specific answers, such as the reason for these note choices, if you explain where the notes came from. did you disassemble some chords and write the notes down or did you just write down all the notes used in a solo or melody?
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#12
Ok. So you've got a "pile of notes" if you will. What if your overall goal here? Why is it relevant or important to you to be able to associate them with a "scale"?

What will that help you achieve? I'm assuming you're trying to figure out what key you're in or something. Only you know the answer to that, but the thing here that makes me say what I said is:

Not everything needs to fit into a scale. Music isn't always diatonic (it's more often NOT), and not every note in a sequence of chords or notes is going to relate back to a single scale. So, if that's your goal here then I think you're possibly taking the wrong approach.

My process for determining the overall key of a piece would be as follows:
1. Listen to determine the tonic (I) - which note sounds "best", that's probably your tonic
2. Is it major or minor...?

That solves 90% of your problems...if you want to dig deeper into what the underlying harmony implies chromatically...then ya.
Last edited by chronowarp at Apr 2, 2012,
#13
See, that's much better Chonowarp, thankyou

And yes Kryptic, I took apart the chords for a progression I made to tried to figure out what scale they fit in to determine the key.
#14
Quote by AussiePage
This in no way relates to my question

Thanks TC94

Yes it does.

You need to know how the notes are being used before you can figure out the scale.
Actually called Mark!

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#15
Quote by steven seagull
Yes it does.

You need to know how the notes are being used before you can figure out the scale.


But it was a progression I created myself?
#16
Quote by AussiePage
But it was a progression I created myself?


You gave us no context for the notes in your first post.

If you wanna know the key of a progression listen out for where it resolves - where it sonds finished. Depending on weather that chord is a major or minor chord you will probably be building a melody using the corresponding major/minor scale, but taking into account that some chords may be non diatonic (not built from the scale) so you may want to use accidentals (notes not in the scale).

Next time you plan to ask a similarly vague question consider giving us more context - ie where you got the notes from and why you want to know what scale they may be contained in - that way we can give you better advice without having to pry details from you.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Apr 2, 2012,
#17
Quote by AussiePage
But it was a progression I created myself?

Then you may have invented a scale.
#19
Quote by chronowarp
Post the chords!

^ this it will greatly help in determining why the chords work well together....
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#20
Quote by AussiePage

Also, is there another (faster) way to figure it out rather than process of elimination?


Yes, you decide which note is the tonic (ie what key it's in, where it resolves) then you look at the other notes in relation to that.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#21
Quote by krypticguitar87
^ this it will greatly help in determining why the chords work well together....



A - B11 - E - D7
#22
IT's in the Key of E.

IV-V-I-bVII.

the D7 is not diatonic. It's more or less modal mixture. If you need a scale to work over this...I'd say play E major over the first three chords, and try E minor pent over the D7.
Last edited by chronowarp at Apr 2, 2012,
#23
Quote by AussiePage
A - B11 - E - D7

What's the rhythm and duration of each chord?
Are there any other chords in the song?
Where does it resolve?

It could be I - V/V - V - IV7 - (I) in A. Plagal cadence.

Scale: A Major, for the most part.

We need more context...
Quote by AussiePage
B C C# D# E F# G# A

Also, is there another (faster) way to figure it out rather than process of elimination?

... so what you posted here kinda makes sense, cuz the D# is the major 3rd of B11, and the C is the b7 of D7.
Last edited by mdc at Apr 2, 2012,
#26
Just read this. Thanks guys, really helped. Couldn't give much more context, that's why I ask questions here
#27
Quote by AussiePage
Just read this. Thanks guys, really helped. Couldn't give much more context, that's why I ask questions here

just remember next time you need help like this try posting the chords instead of the single notes, good luck man!
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.