#1
Hi i read in a mag that over any dominant chord you can play the diminished triad up a semitone eg over e7 play f diminished arpeggios. How is this so because there is no f note in e7 chord can any1 shed some light? cheers.
#5
Forgot to mention, you can also play a diminished arpeggio off each chord tone of E7. So G♯, B, and D.

They're all the same notes, essentially, but it helps to create a sense of movement over a static chord if you play those arpeggios.
#7
Quote by petered1
Hi i read in a mag that over any dominant chord you can play the diminished triad up a semitone eg over e7 play f diminished arpeggios. How is this so because there is no f note in e7 chord can any1 shed some light? cheers.


It plays altered dominant chord tones. The F is a b9.

Best,

Sean
#8
i know that the a harmonic minor is the also e phrygian dominant but do these both come from the c scale as the the e is the third note of c [phrygian] and obviously the A minor is the sixth note of c? cheers
#9
technically they all start as their own major scale then get altered. so A harmonic minor is A major with a flatted 3rd and 6th, and E phrygian dominant is E major with a flatted 2nd 6th and 7th. if you were to say the A minor scale its really just the A major scale with a flatted 3rd 6th and 7th, it just happens to encompass all the same notes as C major, which makes them relative scales....
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.