#1
I'm thinking of getting a nicer stock of instrument mics for live miking, and I've started to feel that SM57s can be too nasally for certain guitar sounds and are perhaps a little overrated. Do I just need to play with mic placement a bit more, or are there better alternatives for a similar price? I'm just looking for a mic with a more natural response faithful to the instruments and with the proper durability for miking up cabs in a live traveling band situation.
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#3
try combining a senn. 421 with the sm57. put the 57 slightly off angle and off the axis of the cone, and the 421 directly at the rim (about 1 inch into speaker past rim).


blending those 2 mics will get you some monstrous sounds. sorry though that i don't have a demo for youl


edit: something i forgot to mention, when using 2 mics, or ever switching mics, you'll want to have a variable impedance preamp. that would allow both mics impedance to be matched correctly which will sound better.
Last edited by Ashe_Mc at Apr 2, 2012,
#4
Based on it's popularity and history with recording guitar, it's probably a problem with it's placement or your tone.

Another possibility is that it is defective or counterfeit (the SM57 is a popular mic to fake).
#5
57's are the staple of guitar and instrument micing and have been for many years. the reason they sound a bit nasally is that it can help the guitar cut through the mix in live situations.

for studio micing i suggest what Ashe_Mc says but also try the sennheiser e606 or the e906.
http://www.thomann.de/gb/sennheiser_e606_instrumentenmikrofon.htm

but then again its all about mic placement and technique.
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#6
Placement is vital you really have to move the mic and record from various positions - then you have to layer the guitar tracks (especially if using distortions) and then you start getting a killer sound.
#7
Quote by sg4ever
I'm thinking of getting a nicer stock of instrument mics for live miking, and I've started to feel that SM57s can be too nasally for certain guitar sounds and are perhaps a little overrated. Do I just need to play with mic placement a bit more, or are there better alternatives for a similar price? I'm just looking for a mic with a more natural response faithful to the instruments and with the proper durability for miking up cabs in a live traveling band situation.

An SM57 will do you fine. I play a very similar rig to yours through one every week and have had no complaints/issues with it. I like to place mine kissing the grill, about an inch left of the centre, angled at about 45˚ out from the centre.
Last edited by ACollier at Apr 2, 2012,
#8
the sm57 sounds great on distorted guitars, but I'll go for something else for cleans. I'm not a fan of the 421 for guitars, but the e906 sounds AMAZING.
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#9
For recording purposes, an SM57 should be pretty workable for close-micing an amp, but you definitely may have to play around with mic positions and angles.

With an SM57, I think it sounds best when both off-center and off-axis from the speak cone to one degree or another. This is something that's going to vary with amps and settings though. Generally, though, the bulk of my "negative experience" with the mic is actually that I've found when it's pointed right at the center of the cone, it's too bright or tinny or harsh. Raw sounding.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Apr 2, 2012,