#1
I'm in the process of teaching an autistic, mostly non-verbal first grader to talk. I've started him associating words with objects and people in the school building, but to go beyond the school building, I'm going to need pictures. Finding pictures won't be too hard, but I need to find a way to assemble them and play them back in a random order, otherwise he'll just memorize the order rather than learning what word goes with what picture. Photobucket (my usual pic hosting site) does slide shows but not in a random order. PWW suggested setting pics up in a file and then playing them as a Windows screensaver, but I don't think that can be paused and then resumed the way I want.

Is anyone familiar with something that will take all my pictures and then play them in a randomly-ordered slide show that can be paused?
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#2
You may be able to find some sort of slide randomizer for PowerPoint?
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#3
PowerPoint was the first place I looked. No random play, and I'm not familiar with any "slide randomizer".
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#6
I just want to wish you luck with that TS. My little brother has autism, is in 3rd grade and still cannot talk properly.
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#7
Quote by RU Experienced?
You could print them out and make flashcards out of them and shuffle the ordering manually.


I may end up doing that, but I was hoping to find a digital way because (a) the kid is really into computers, and (b) it would be a lot cheaper and less labor-intensive.
Death to Ovation haters!
#8
Quote by PatchworkMan
PowerPoint was the first place I looked. No random play, and I'm not familiar with any "slide randomizer".
http://www.childandme.com/randomizers-for-powerpoint-problems-resolved/#hudson

Is this worth looking into? I have a Mac and use Keynote, so I can't say whether this DL is legit or not. Seems credible and worth a shot, though.
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#9
You using windows? Doubleclick on an image, then there's a slideshow button in the middle of the panel at the bottom. After entering slideshow mode you can right click on the image then select shuffle or whatever it is in english. Press space for pause.
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#10
You can do that if you just save them into a folder, right click, preview, full screen it, right click it again and you can set it to shuffle, pause it, press left and right to go between them

Edit: for the sake of fuck, ninja'd
Last edited by Ninja Vampirate at Apr 2, 2012,
#12
Could use IRFAN view. It's a picture viewer that you can set to a random slideshow of any folder/s, with click/keyboard input or set to a timer. It also plays gifs, if you're on windows 7 and don't have a gif viewer.
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#13
Even though I'm not autistic, I was one of those kids back when I was younger. It's not that I didn't know the words (as my pre-school sp-ed teacher can tell you ), but rather it was a choice to not communicate with words. If you want to get this kid to open up, try actually talking with him, not teaching him to speak. Autism does not mean idiocy. If he sees that you're actually interested in what he has to say, he'll start talking; on the other hand, if he senses that you think he's dumb (which I sure as hell would if you did that to me), then he's not going to say a word to you.

In short, you're doing it wrong, Teach.
I've been told bassists get women all over the place...

LIES!! ALL LIES!!
Last edited by Bassy-Justice at Apr 2, 2012,
#14
Because random people on the internet know better how to teach than people who have actually been trained and are qualified to do it.
#15
Quote by Bassy-Justice
Even though I'm not autistic, I was one of those kids back when I was younger. It's not that I didn't know the words (as my pre-school sp-ed teacher can tell you ), but rather it was a choice to not communicate with words. If you want to get this kid to open up, try actually talking with him, not teaching him to speak. Autism does not mean idiocy. If he sees that you're actually interested in what he has to say, he'll start talking; on the other hand, if he senses that you think he's dumb (which I sure as hell would if you did that to me), then he's not going to say a word to you.

In short, you're doing it wrong, Teach.


Oh is that how you reach to autistic kids? If only we knew sooner!
#17
Quote by Bassy-Justice
Even though I'm not autistic, I was one of those kids back when I was younger. It's not that I didn't know the words (as my pre-school sp-ed teacher can tell you ), but rather it was a choice to not communicate with words. If you want to get this kid to open up, try actually talking with him, not teaching him to speak. Autism does not mean idiocy. If he sees that you're actually interested in what he has to say, he'll start talking; on the other hand, if he senses that you think he's dumb (which I sure as hell would if you did that to me), then he's not going to say a word to you.

In short, you're doing it wrong, Teach.


What the fuck is this shit.


You clearly know nothing about autism, so take your folksy personal stories and patronising non-comments elsewhere.


OP, as an actual teacher (albeit of older kids) I would be tempted to just print them out and shuffle by hand. Perhaps then you could make it into a game involving more of a semantic field association - do you have the game Top Trumps in America? You could make each picture into a top trump card - or the two of you could make the card together as a fun activity - and then he could sort them into lexical associations, things like table and chair and lamp are all things you would find in the kitchen; desk and pen and paper are all things you would find in a classroom, and so on.

If you want to continue engaging the kid through digital media, then great, but I think the other useful posts in this thread have pretty much covered that.


Good luck
#18
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
You clearly know nothing about autism, so take your folksy personal stories and patronising non-comments elsewhere.


And how would you know this about me? I don't know you (nor does it sound like I want to), and you don't know me, so what makes you think you can make this assumption? Arrogance is never an appealing trait.

I know full well what autism is. I also know that it is grossly overdiagnosed in today's culture. I've known several kids who are legitimately autistic, and I know kids who are labeled autistic but really aren't. I myself was almost diagnosed with autism when I was younger. Rather than name-calling and being brusque, perhaps you should open your mind to other possibilities.

I refuse to retract my statement. The autistic children I know will NEVER respond to a teacher that honestly believed they could not speak, rather than simply being unwilling. Instead of teaching words ("this is a dog," "that is a pencil"...No shit!), try working on social skills, communicating, and soothing the kid's nerves about conversing with others.

Of course, what the **** do I know? I'm just a (by)product of American special education, a victim of idiot special education "teachers" in public schools, and a friend of several autistic people who sure as hell know how to communicate-- provided you don't underestimate their abilities.
I've been told bassists get women all over the place...

LIES!! ALL LIES!!
#19
Quote by Bassy-Justice
And how would you know this about me? I don't know you (nor does it sound like I want to), and you don't know me, so what makes you think you can make this assumption? Arrogance is never an appealing trait.

I know full well what autism is. I also know that it is grossly overdiagnosed in today's culture. I've known several kids who are legitimately autistic, and I know kids who are labeled autistic but really aren't. I myself was almost diagnosed with autism when I was younger. Rather than name-calling and being brusque, perhaps you should open your mind to other possibilities.

I refuse to retract my statement. The autistic children I know will NEVER respond to a teacher that honestly believed they could not speak, rather than simply being unwilling. Instead of teaching words ("this is a dog," "that is a pencil"...No shit!), try working on social skills, communicating, and soothing the kid's nerves about conversing with others.

Of course, what the **** do I know? I'm just a (by)product of American special education, a victim of idiot special education "teachers" in public schools, and a friend of several autistic people who sure as hell know how to communicate-- provided you don't underestimate their abilities.



Quite.


So you think that actual educational professionals know less than someone who has, in your own words, both been to school and met autistic people?


I'm also wondering if you might suggest that people in wheelchairs would be much more motivated to walk if they didn't have an excuse not to all the time?
#20
I'm detecting an insult or two in there. I also see you missing my point. I don't know where the ts is teaching from, but my education has been American. I'll be the first to tell you I despise the American education system. And here in America, yes, I am fairly sure that I'd be more capable than most "licensed" special educators, as my experiences with the system has been shaky at best. Does that mean I'm better than all special educators? By no means. And I couldn't teach, as I'm having a hard time keeping my patience with you, a supposedly rational, formed adult. I respect what you guys do; I'm simply suggesting another possibility, as I have stated three times now. Last I checked, if someone asks for suggestions, I can give one, even if it's a little out-of-the-box, if I feel something else needs to be brought up.

Oh, and I suggest you go royally screw yourself for thinking I'm dense enough to believe that people in wheelchairs are too lazy to get up and walk. I know autism is not an easy thing to overcome, but it is not entirely impossible to defeat. Of course, you can't help someone who doesn't want to be helped, nor can you underestimate someone and expect them to be docile.
I've been told bassists get women all over the place...

LIES!! ALL LIES!!
#21
Quote by Bassy-Justice
I'm detecting an insult or two in there. I also see you missing my point. I don't know where the ts is teaching from, but my education has been American. I'll be the first to tell you I despise the American education system. And here in America, yes, I am fairly sure that I'd be more capable than most "licensed" special educators, as my experiences with the system has been shaky at best. Does that mean I'm better than all special educators? By no means. And I couldn't teach, as I'm having a hard time keeping my patience with you, a supposedly rational, formed adult. I respect what you guys do; I'm simply suggesting another possibility, as I have stated three times now. Last I checked, if someone asks for suggestions, I can give one, even if it's a little out-of-the-box, if I feel something else needs to be brought up.

Oh, and I suggest you go royally screw yourself for thinking I'm dense enough to believe that people in wheelchairs are too lazy to get up and walk. I know autism is not an easy thing to overcome, but it is not entirely impossible to defeat. Of course, you can't help someone who doesn't want to be helped, nor can you underestimate someone and expect them to be docile.

For someone who claims to know so much about ASD you sure don't appreciate the "spectrum" bit very much. Autism can manifest itself in a multitude of ways and your assertion that it's overdiagnosed has no basis other than anecdotes and your biased perception because of your background.
#22
Quote by RU Experienced?
For someone who claims to know so much about ASD you sure don't appreciate the "spectrum" bit very much. Autism can manifest itself in a multitude of ways and your assertion that it's overdiagnosed has no basis other than anecdotes and your biased perception because of your background.


This is a good post.

I don't think I could tolerate trying to reply to that myself
#23
You should teach him how to wheeze.


Seriously though, use flash cards like others have said.
Quote by L2112Lif
I put a ton of my capital into SW Airlines... The next day, THE NEXT DAY these nutters fly into the WTC. What the hell? Apparently no one wanted to fly anymore, and I was like "What gives? God damnit Osama, let me win a fuggin' game!"
#24
Quote by RU Experienced?
For someone who claims to know so much about ASD you sure don't appreciate the "spectrum" bit very much. Autism can manifest itself in a multitude of ways and your assertion that it's overdiagnosed has no basis other than anecdotes and your biased perception because of your background.


I'd almost believe that claim if it wasn't for the current rate of autism in children being diagnosed as 1 in 88 and rising. Forgive me for being slightly suspect of current diagnosis trends. ADHD is another condition which is way overdiagnosed (ironically, another one I've been accused of having), as I do know several kids who have been diagnosed and use it as an excuse to act however the hell they want. But besides personal anecdotes (which is a poor form of evidence in arguments as this), let's use logic. Parents anymore are becoming more and more concerned with their kids being "better-than-average;" that is to say, they want their 2.2 kids to be more athletic, more intelligent, more popular, and have more possessions than any other kid in America. When something comes along that isn't up to the parents' expectations (e.g., the kid's more interested in observing the bugs than doing their homework, or more interested in playing tag than enjoying soccer practice), the parents think it reflects on them. They don't want to feel like failures, so they decide to find a scapegoat in order to make themselves better. The kid's a little socially awkward and good at memorization, but doesn't like going to school? "Oh, he must be autistic." The kid's a little more energetic than most and needs to be told to focus? "Oh, she has ADHD." Not only does this work to create a label for kids outside of "ideals," it also puts the parents on a pedestal, because everyone give props to parents who have an autistic child, right? It's cheapening the condition, stigmatizing the kid, and for what? To make parents feel better. It sickens me.

That's the root of my argument. Not friends, not my poor experiences. The facts, and what I know of society at large. Keep thinking that every kid who's diagnosed is autistic, and you're no better than those who believe every jailbird is guilty. It's the exact same thing if you think about it.
I've been told bassists get women all over the place...

LIES!! ALL LIES!!
#25
Quote by Bassy-Justice
Even though I'm not autistic, I was one of those kids back when I was younger. It's not that I didn't know the words (as my pre-school sp-ed teacher can tell you ), but rather it was a choice to not communicate with words. If you want to get this kid to open up, try actually talking with him, not teaching him to speak. Autism does not mean idiocy. If he sees that you're actually interested in what he has to say, he'll start talking; on the other hand, if he senses that you think he's dumb (which I sure as hell would if you did that to me), then he's not going to say a word to you.

In short, you're doing it wrong, Teach.


Bassy, this student is not you. My student needs help learning to talk. Your ignorance and presumption are astounding. Your childhood experiences do not qualify you to diagnose my student or to tell me how to do my job. **** off.
Death to Ovation haters!
#26
Quote by Bassy-Justice
Even though I'm not autistic, I was one of those kids back when I was younger. It's not that I didn't know the words (as my pre-school sp-ed teacher can tell you ), but rather it was a choice to not communicate with words. If you want to get this kid to open up, try actually talking with him, not teaching him to speak. Autism does not mean idiocy. If he sees that you're actually interested in what he has to say, he'll start talking; on the other hand, if he senses that you think he's dumb (which I sure as hell would if you did that to me), then he's not going to say a word to you.

In short, you're doing it wrong, Teach.
ggg1 ggg3

.
#27
Quote by PatchworkMan
Bassy, this student is not you. My student needs help learning to talk. Your ignorance and presumption are astounding. Your childhood experiences do not qualify you to diagnose my student or to tell me how to do my job. **** off.

+1
#28
Would everyone please just ignore Bassy from here on out? I started this thread in the hopes of finding something that can help me give this child the help he needs, and Bassy is hijacking it and making it about himself.
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#29
Another thing I could think of is to put name tags on the student's desks and label things around the classroom and do some one on one work with him to try to help him with talking. But then again, I'm not a teacher/expert in autism so I might be wrong.
Quote by L2112Lif
I put a ton of my capital into SW Airlines... The next day, THE NEXT DAY these nutters fly into the WTC. What the hell? Apparently no one wanted to fly anymore, and I was like "What gives? God damnit Osama, let me win a fuggin' game!"
#30
Quote by PatchworkMan
Bassy, this student is not you. My student needs help learning to talk. Your ignorance and presumption are astounding. Your childhood experiences do not qualify you to diagnose my student or to tell me how to do my job. **** off.




I tried to be helpful, let me know if you find any use in my post.


Also have a look at this PowerPoint slide randomiser from the TES, available for free download (if you register) here:

http://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Random-Name-Generator-3006216/


You can just insert a picture to each of the slides where it says to use a name. But it is also useful for a whole-class situation.
#31
Quote by RU Experienced?
For someone who claims to know so much about ASD you sure don't appreciate the "spectrum" bit very much. Autism can manifest itself in a multitude of ways and your assertion that it's overdiagnosed has no basis other than anecdotes and your biased perception because of your background.

If anything, more people would fall under its net with a spectrum than with a narrowly defined (incorrectly) diagnosis.
#32
TS, maybe since the student is autistic (and they tend to have very specific interests) you could try to find another student that shares some of these interests and encourage them to start being friends. Maybe if this kid has someone that has something in common with him then it might help with his problems with talking.
Quote by L2112Lif
I put a ton of my capital into SW Airlines... The next day, THE NEXT DAY these nutters fly into the WTC. What the hell? Apparently no one wanted to fly anymore, and I was like "What gives? God damnit Osama, let me win a fuggin' game!"
#33
Quote by IRISH_PUNK13
Another thing I could think of is to put name tags on the student's desks and label things around the classroom and do some one on one work with him to try to help him with talking. But then again, I'm not a teacher/expert in autism so I might be wrong.

This is actually a great strategy that we're already using. I need pictures, though, for things that aren't in the school building.
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#34
Quote by PatchworkMan
This is actually a great strategy that we're already using. I need pictures, though, for things that aren't in the school building.

Yeah, I would print up pictures from google and make flash cards. That seems like the best option.
Quote by L2112Lif
I put a ton of my capital into SW Airlines... The next day, THE NEXT DAY these nutters fly into the WTC. What the hell? Apparently no one wanted to fly anymore, and I was like "What gives? God damnit Osama, let me win a fuggin' game!"