#2
U need to reasearch what ohms are - ur question doesn't make any sense.
#3
There is no better version of Ohms, Ohms is a measurement of resistance in an electrical circuit or device. The speaker in a guitar cab is a driver it takes an electrical impulse from your guitar amp which oscillates the speaker cone which moves air which is heard as sound. A driver is a HUGE resistor it does nothing but dissipate the energy from the source (amp) to keep from frying your guitar amp you need to match up the proper Ohms resistance of drivers to the load required on your amp. So if your amp requires an 8ohm load you need a combination of drivers that equates out to 8ohms.

That said you can take two 4 ohm drivers and connect them in series, one of the drivers positive connections to the opposite drivers negative connection and the two drivers will combine to make 8 ohms. You can also take two 16 ohm drivers and connect them in parallel, the positive and negative leads of one driver connected to the positive and negative leads of the second driver and it will drop the resistance of the two drivers to 8 ohms.

If your amp requires a load of 8 Ohms never put a smaller load on it, this will cause the driver to pull more power out of the amp then its capable of handling and will overload it real fast resulting in a huge puff of smoke and a dead amp.
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#4
So nothing is better is just diferent. The 16 is not louder or stronger than 4?
#6
there is no better, only what is needed. MATCH IMPEDANCES
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#7
+1 always match.

that's all you need to remember really. do you have a tube amp or a solid state amp?

in a tube amp one could claim that 16 ohms is better because you are utilizing ALL of the windings (capacity) of the Output Transformer but your the volume is the same. For that reason - there is no better.
#8
It's like saying what air pressure is best for tires. It depends on the tire and what you are doing with it.
#10
Just make sure to match the number with the output of your amplifier. Tube amps, in particular, can be damaged if they're underloaded or greatly overloaded.

The are a lot of complicated electrical engineering gibberish reasoning I could go into, but ultimately matching the numbers is the best move.
#11
Quote by 667
It's like saying what air pressure is best for tires. It depends on the tire and what you are doing with it.

wrong analogy dude

tyre pressure may vary and be adapted to certain situations,
whereas ohms matching is not variable depending on the situation
#12
Depends on the amp. Some amps dont give a shit so long as they impedance is the same. Some others like a particular setup. Mesa says in the manual that 8 ohms is the best setting for the Mark IV. Dont own one so cant comment if it makes any difference
#13
Quote by WtrPlyr
more is always betterest.

ALWAYS


Nope.

A lower ohm value equates to more power. The higher the ohm value the greater the resistance.

Not an issue if you match, or "have to" match your ohms, but if you have an amp with a minimum ohm value (non switchable) - your amp will be louder and more efficient the closer your speakers ohm value is to the amps minimum. For example, if the amp is rated for a minimum of 4 amps, you are better off running a 8 ohm load than a 16 ohm load.

Less is the best for mismatched amps/cabs.
Last edited by 667 at Apr 2, 2012,
#14
Quote by Dunkelheit-164
wrong analogy dude

tyre pressure may vary and be adapted to certain situations,
whereas ohms matching is not variable depending on the situation

actually you don't always need to match the impedance, it's just usually best if you do.

"always match your impedances" is just a guideline to stop people from damaging their gear out of ignorance. but since most people don't know what is ok and what's going to destroy their amp/speakers (i don't claim to know, either), it's definitely best to stick to the guidelines.
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Last edited by Blompcube at Apr 2, 2012,
#15
Quote by Dunkelheit-164
wrong analogy dude

tyre pressure may vary and be adapted to certain situations,
whereas ohms matching is not variable depending on the situation



You are over complicating it. It's a pretty simple analogy really.

Manufacturers state the tires recommended pressure. That pressure value is irrelevant to the tires quality.

Oh... and ohm matching does depend on the situation. If you are wiring 4 16 ohm speakers together in a cab, that cabs ohm wont be 16. It all depends on how they are wired together.

Last edited by 667 at Apr 2, 2012,
#16
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Depends on the amp. Some amps dont give a shit so long as they impedance is the same. Some others like a particular setup. Mesa says in the manual that 8 ohms is the best setting for the Mark IV. Dont own one so cant comment if it makes any difference


My Mesa RA100H instruction booklet says the same, 8ohms is preferred, I have only been able to try 4ohms though.

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#17
Quote by 667
You are over complicating it. It's a pretty simple analogy really.

Manufacturers state the tires recommended pressure. That pressure value is irrelevant to the tires quality.

Oh... and ohm matching does depend on the situation. If you are wiring 4 16 ohm speakers together in a cab, that cabs ohm wont be 16. It all depends on how they are wired together.



lol owned
#18
Quote by 667
Nope.

A lower ohm value equates to more power. The higher the ohm value the greater the resistance.

Not an issue if you match, or "have to" match your ohms, but if you have an amp with a minimum ohm value (non switchable) - your amp will be louder and more efficient the closer your speakers ohm value is to the amps minimum. For example, if the amp is rated for a minimum of 4 amps, you are better off running a 8 ohm load than a 16 ohm load.

Less is the best for mismatched amps/cabs.

Wouter was just joking lolol

Yeah TS, listen to everyone saying that as long as you're matching ohms, you're good to go. Anyone claiming that 16 or 8 is better is either trying too hard or pretending they can hear a difference.
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#19
Quote by Dunkelheit-164

whereas ohms matching is not variable depending on the situation

Don't tell that to Eddie Van Halen


Quote by 667
If you are wiring 4 16 ohm speakers together in a cab, that cabs ohm wont be 16. It all depends on how they are wired together.


If 4-16 ohm speakers are wired in Series/Parallel for mono/stereo operation the overall cab speaker load will be 16.
#22
Quote by Dunkelheit-164
On the other hand, nothing beats a good ol' 32 Ohms
Coz it doubles teh power of 16 Ohms!


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#23
this thread should have been named, "Ohms, watts better?"
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#24
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH

If 4-16 ohm speakers are wired in Series/Parallel for mono/stereo operation the overall cab speaker load will be 16.


Noted.
#26
Quote by 667
Nope.

A lower ohm value equates to more power. The higher the ohm value the greater the resistance.


wat wat wat wat wat wat wat wat

This is so ****ing stupid. Output power is constant as long as the amp's output and the cab's input are matched. That's why there are different output Z taps. P=I^2R. So if output power is 100w constant across the board, then 100=4I^2, 100=8I^2, 100=16I^2. For 4Z, I=5, for 8Z, I=3.53553, for 16Z, I=2.5. Then use V=IR to solve for voltage. For 4Z, V=20, for 8Z, V=28.2842, for 16Z, V=40.

This is why shit blows up when your amp's output Z is higher than the cab's input Z. If you use the P=I^2R equation, then solve for P with this situation (voltage output is constant regardless of load for each output Z), you get the circuit trying to draw more current than it would if the impedances were matched, i.e. if you run a 16Z amp into an 8Z load, the amp will attempt to draw I=V/R, I=40/8, I=5A. P=VI, 40x5 is a whopping 200w. Your OT isn't rated for that and consequently blows up and your power tubes probably aren't rated for that much current and blow as well.
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#27
Quote by mmolteratx
wat wat wat wat wat wat wat wat

This is so ****ing stupid. Output power is constant as long as the amp's output and the cab's input are matched. That's why there are different output Z taps. P=I^2R. So if output power is 100w constant across the board, then 100=4I^2, 100=8I^2, 100=16I^2. For 4Z, I=5, for 8Z, I=3.53553, for 16Z, I=2.5. Then use V=IR to solve for voltage. For 4Z, V=20, for 8Z, V=28.2842, for 16Z, V=40.

This is why shit blows up when your amp's output Z is higher than the cab's input Z. If you use the P=I^2R equation, then solve for P with this situation (voltage output is constant regardless of load for each output Z), you get the circuit trying to draw more current than it would if the impedances were matched, i.e. if you run a 16Z amp into an 8Z load, the amp will attempt to draw I=V/R, I=40/8, I=5A. P=VI, 40x5 is a whopping 200w. Your OT isn't rated for that and consequently blows up and your power tubes probably aren't rated for that much current and blow as well.


just ignore the solid staters man. their physics are all weird and shit.
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#28
Oh wait. Didn't read far enough to realize he was talking about a fixed output Z SS amp. My bad. Gonna leave that up in case anyone else wants some learnin'.
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#29
Quote by mmolteratx
wat wat wat wat wat wat wat wat

This is so ****ing stupid. Output power is constant as long as the amp's output and the cab's input are matched. That's why there are different output Z taps. P=I^2R. So if output power is 100w constant across the board, then 100=4I^2, 100=8I^2, 100=16I^2. For 4Z, I=5, for 8Z, I=3.53553, for 16Z, I=2.5. Then use V=IR to solve for voltage. For 4Z, V=20, for 8Z, V=28.2842, for 16Z, V=40.

This is why shit blows up when your amp's output Z is higher than the cab's input Z. If you use the P=I^2R equation, then solve for P with this situation (voltage output is constant regardless of load for each output Z), you get the circuit trying to draw more current than it would if the impedances were matched, i.e. if you run a 16Z amp into an 8Z load, the amp will attempt to draw I=V/R, I=40/8, I=5A. P=VI, 40x5 is a whopping 200w. Your OT isn't rated for that and consequently blows up and your power tubes probably aren't rated for that much current and blow as well.


oh sweet so luckily enough i ****ed up earlier the safe way? (accidentally plugged my 16 ohm cab into my laney's 4 ohm socket )

yay for dumb luck
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#30
I don't see where the op posted anything that questions SS or tube technologies.
#31
Quote by mmolteratx
wat wat wat wat wat wat wat wat

This is so ****ing stupid. Output power is constant as long as the amp's output and the cab's input are matched. That's why there are different output Z taps. P=I^2R. So if output power is 100w constant across the board, then 100=4I^2, 100=8I^2, 100=16I^2. For 4Z, I=5, for 8Z, I=3.53553, for 16Z, I=2.5. Then use V=IR to solve for voltage. For 4Z, V=20, for 8Z, V=28.2842, for 16Z, V=40.

This is why shit blows up when your amp's output Z is higher than the cab's input Z. If you use the P=I^2R equation, then solve for P with this situation (voltage output is constant regardless of load for each output Z), you get the circuit trying to draw more current than it would if the impedances were matched, i.e. if you run a 16Z amp into an 8Z load, the amp will attempt to draw I=V/R, I=40/8, I=5A. P=VI, 40x5 is a whopping 200w. Your OT isn't rated for that and consequently blows up and your power tubes probably aren't rated for that much current and blow as well.


Ya, you pretty much don't know what u are talking about. You are going way beyond the scope of this thread with mumbo jumbo. To get u on track, if u care, - My son has a Peavy bass head that has one speaker output - with a minimum load of 4 ohsm. It handles anything through that one output with no selector switch. There's a table printed next to it that shows u the wattage at specific ohms. 4 ohms at 300, 8 ohms at 150, 16 ohms at 75 (or something like that).
Now granted, it's solid state, but this discussion isnt about tube ohm or SS ohm, it's about ohms period. There was nommention of an amp.
Now maybe you didn't read everything, and u just chimed in... No biggie - u just did it in a douche bag way. U are ignorant on this subject.
#32
Quote by 667
Ya, you pretty much don't know what u are talking about. You are going way beyond the scope of this thread with mumbo jumbo. To get u on track, if u care, - My son has a Peavy bass head that has one speaker output - with a minimum load of 4 ohsm. It handles anything through that one output with no selector switch. There's a table printed next to it that shows u the wattage at specific ohms. 4 ohms at 300, 8 ohms at 150, 16 ohms at 75 (or something like that).
Now granted, it's solid state, but this discussion isnt about tube ohm or SS ohm, it's about ohms period. There was nommention of an amp.
Now maybe you didn't read everything, and u just chimed in... No biggie - u just did it in a douche bag way. U are ignorant on this subject.


hi. you are wrong.

brush up on direct coupled fixed impedance transistor circuits and transformer coupled output circuits.
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#33
Quote by 667
Ya, you pretty much don't know what u are talking about.

U are ignorant on this subject.

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#34
Quote by mmolteratx
Oh wait. Didn't read far enough to realize he was talking about a fixed output Z SS amp. My bad. Gonna leave that up in case anyone else wants some learnin'.


Whoops! I didn't read this until now. Sorry, I shouldn't have posted what I posted because u corrected urself right after . I was ignorant in that respect.

Ur not a douche.
#35
Quote by 667
Whoops! I didn't read this until now. Sorry, I shouldn't have posted what I posted because u corrected urself right after . I was ignorant in that respect.

Ur not a douche.


No worries. After all, I did the same thing.
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#36
Quote by mmolteratx
No worries. After all, I did the same thing.


I was using my iPhome for most of this. I miss a lot on that tiny screen :P
Cheers!
Last edited by 667 at Apr 2, 2012,
#38
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
If 4-16 ohm speakers are wired in Series/Parallel for mono/stereo operation the overall cab speaker load will be 16.


what?



oh yeah, you're right



glad someone caught that. series-parallel wiring was used purposefully for maintaining a speaker's impedance in four-speaker cabinets.

Now granted, it's solid state, but this discussion isnt about tube ohm or SS ohm, it's about ohms period. There was nommention of an amp.


solid state amp's don't match impedance (they use impedance bridging) and they don't have a transformer (the amplifier is loaded directly by the speaker).

i took it as the thread referring to 'how are ohms applicable to amps and tone'; SS and tube amps act quite differently to different loads. while matt didn't address SS amps specifically, he is actually exceptionally knowledgeable and what he said is right.

there just seems to be a communication gap here, we're talking apples and oranges to a certain extent.
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