#1
So im hoping on having a new macbook pro heading my way here in the near future and I had some questions for users of garage band.

First of all, whats the specs on your mac? The reason i ask is because im stuck deciding on whether or not the bigger memory is better for recording. Or if you can even tell the difference. If i stuck with the 4gb compared to the 8, would garageband work just fine? and is there a great improvement from 4 to 8?

2.4 GHz vs. 2.8 GHz? Does this make a difference?

Thanks
"never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway"
#2
Your disk speed is far more important than anything. That being said, a hefty amount of ram doesn't hurt if you plan on recording or playing a lot of tracks simultaneously. You don't really need a lot of ram unless you're trying to process a lot at once though. I used only 2 gigs on my old macbook forever and it was fine. It would probably be cheaper for you to get the standard and upgrade after market. I got 8 gigs for like 40 bucks.

As for processing, yes, it's important. I would get the 2.8 if you can afford it simply because processors get outdated so quickly and the macbook's are soldered in.

My laptop is 8 gigs of ram, 2.0Ghz and it's just fine for recording a stereo track or recording a single track over a few others but it does start to struggle with a lot of synth instruments (More than 6 or 8). My desktop however is 8 gigs, SSD and 2.8 and it doesn't even hiccup at playing 32 tracks simultaneously.

It's useful to learn how to shut down nonessential processes when recording with a laptop. They're simply not as powerful as a desktop. If you manage to shut down some processes when you record though it can work quite nicely!
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Last edited by Artemis Entreri at Apr 2, 2012,
#3
i see on apples website that switching from a 750gb serial ata drive to a 128gb solid state drive costs more money. wouldnt the 750 gig be way more expensive? i dont get it?
"never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway"
#5
Quote by neil287x
i see on apples website that switching from a 750gb serial ata drive to a 128gb solid state drive costs more money. wouldnt the 750 gig be way more expensive? i dont get it?

No. The SSD is much faster.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
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#6
So does the fact that it is faster justify it being smaller? wouldnt bigger be better?
"never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway"
#7
Quote by neil287x
So does the fact that it is faster justify it being smaller? wouldnt bigger be better?

Just like you pay extra for more gigs of storage in a HDD, you have to pay for more in a SSD. The data storage life of an SSD is up to 200 years, eventually an HDD will fail, because it has moving parts, an SSD doesn't. The data on an SSD is saved to flash storage, which allows the data to be accessed almost instantly, whereas an HDD stores its data on a "disc," which it needs to spin to read.. You're paying more, because it's a much newer technology.

SSDs aren't normally used to store everything to - The most common application is to install the operating system and programs on it, while having a second HDD, with a much larger storage capacity, to save files generated by said programs, or downloaded off the internet. This allows load times of applications and the OS to be extremely quick, while still retaining high storage capacity for files you'd open with the programs saved on the SSD.

They actually make "hybrid" drives for this very reason. A hybrid drive will have a small section of it reserved as an SSD, while the rest is an HDD.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#8
Quote by MatrixClaw
Just like you pay extra for more gigs of storage in a HDD, you have to pay for more in a SSD. The data storage life of an SSD is up to 200 years, eventually an HDD will fail, because it has moving parts; the data on an SSD is saved to flash storage, which allows the data to be accessed almost instantly. You're paying more, because it's a much newer technology.

SSDs aren't normally used to store everything to - The most common application is to install the operating system and programs on it, while having a second HDD, with a much larger storage capacity, to save files generated by said programs, or downloaded off the internet. This allows load times of applications and the OS to be extremely quick, while still retaining high storage capacity for files you'd open with the programs saved on the SSD.

They actually make "hybrid" drives for this very reason. A hybrid drive will have a small section of it reserved as an SSD, while the rest is an HDD.


Awesome that makes sense now. Now it's just a matter of picking the right mac! Thanks so much
"never take life seriously. Nobody gets out alive anyway"