#1
I know lead guitarists practice their scales but are there exercises to improve both right and left hand technique as a rhythm player? Any suggestions? Any books on the subject? Thx
#2
Well learning some thrash stuff can help with stuff like gallops and downpicking fast and stuff
#4
Depends on what you want to improve in your rhythm playing, and what style you play.

If you want to become a solid rhythm player though i'd recommend practicing some funk. It is really one of the greatest things to study to improve rhythm (and imo to some extent muting).
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#5
make a random chord progression, doesn't matter if it sounds good just play, then change ups and down strokes, mutes and so on to improve that aspect, play scales and gallop every note so 555-888-555-777-ETC, learn some thrash songs (any slayer is great for improving tremolo and gallop picking) or learn some Meshuggah.
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#6
Also, when you guys play a chord like a D major that doesn't use the bottom two strings, do you guys mute them and play all 6 strings or do you only play the t4 strings that are part of the chord?
#7
Quote by junglej25
Also, when you guys play a chord like a D major that doesn't use the bottom two strings, do you guys mute them and play all 6 strings or do you only play the t4 strings that are part of the chord?


4 strings that are part of the chord. Otherwise i would need to mute the E and A string, and that would be hard and waste of efficiency when playing a D major chord in the first position.
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#9
Same things, it's physically exactly the same, the only thing that changes is what notes you play. You'll also notice that basically all the world's best soloists are also killer rhythm players and really they have to be, it's what 99% of the world's guitarists will spend 99% of their time doing.

Personally I'm not a fan of the 'rhythm/lead' distinction anyway: it's all just playing.
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#10
Quote by Sickz
4 strings that are part of the chord. Otherwise i would need to mute the E and A string, and that would be hard and waste of efficiency when playing a D major chord in the first position.



Then on upstrokes you have to train yourself to be able to sound the top four strings and pull up before you sound the bottom two? I find that very difficult
#11
Quote by junglej25
Then on upstrokes you have to train yourself to be able to sound the top four strings and pull up before you sound the bottom two? I find that very difficult


Everything's difficult if you can't do it. It will become second nature with time and practice, just keep it up.
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#12
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Same things, it's physically exactly the same, the only thing that changes is what notes you play. You'll also notice that basically all the world's best soloists are also killer rhythm players and really they have to be, it's what 99% of the world's guitarists will spend 99% of their time doing.

Personally I'm not a fan of the 'rhythm/lead' distinction anyway: it's all just playing.


Quote for truth.

I'm a believer that you only need to be as technically skilled as the most challenging song you want to learn requires. If you find that your technique or sense of rhythm isn't sufficient, learn the song that makes you think that. That's the best exercise - it gives you a musical context while also improving your technique.
#13
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr

tPersonally I'm not a fan of the 'rhythm/lead' distinction anyway: it's all just playing.


This. To get the most of guitar playing people should keep this distinction out their heads. It's all just sound

To tighten up your playing it's all about right hand. Practise your strumming and picking to a metronome and stay right in the pocket

On the D chord question: You have to be able to hit only the strings you want, even when strumming. Sometimes to acentuate the lower D I will mute the open E and A with my thumb, but it's not so they don't ring when I'm strumming, It's just to clean up the bassline if I change to D from Aminor, for example.
Work on that right hand accuracy.
#14
regarding the d chord, i don't personally usually mute the top two, but have also heard of people muting with the thumb as it will prevent the top 2 strings from vibrating
#16
Learn some Pantera! Honestly, that Psycho Holiday intro is a damn fine exercise.
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#17
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Everything's difficult if you can't do it. It will become second nature with time and practice, just keep it up.

^this

also since my bass player tends to play the root of the chord, I like to wrap my thumb around and frett the F# on the 6th string and let the A ring... but to be fair I have rather large hands so I find it rather easy to do that.

also to build rhythm the easiest way is to learn alot of rhythm heavy songs, lots of people here listed Thrash and Metal, some one mentioned Funk as well all of these are great genres, I prefer Funk out of all of them since lots of people I know end up being tempted to learn the lead stuff in those other two

but the bands I feel helped out alot for rhythm for me were Rage Against the Machine (great blend of funk and hiphop like rhythms), Creedence Clearwater Revival, the Ramones, Green Day, Nirvana, and early Disturbed. There are plenty of others but these are all rhythm heavy guitar bands, and some of them also offer single note rhythms like Down on the Corner By CCR

anyway I hope this post helps!
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#18
I love the fact that some people seem to think that "rhythm guitar" automatically equates to "complex metal"

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#19
Quote by steven seagull
I love the fact that some people seem to think that "rhythm guitar" automatically equates to "complex metal"

Lose the blinkers guys, they aren't helping you



What? Theres "complex metal" now?

"Technical", now "complex", I predict the next new moniker will be "sophisticated metal".
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#20
The one thing that all outstanding guitarist share is an excellent sense of rythmn, and for some strange reason, guitarist (if they even give it any thought) put it last on their priority list to learn.

One of the best exercises to help develop rhthmn is to take a drumstick in your picking/stumming hand (as a guitarist, this is your rythmn hand) and practice drumming beats along with songs on a book, pillow, or whatever. The most important thing is to drum to different styles of music, start out with slow or moderate paced songs in common time and listen closely on which beats have the emphasis. What beat do you accent in reggae? What two beats in rock or metal? How about blues.

When you get good at it then move on to other time signatures.
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#21
Part 2.

Now start to work on your strumming patterns. Again, start out slow, listen to some accoustic songs, pop, country, rock. Don't worry about playing the chords (even if you can), since you are just working out the patterns, you just want to mute the strings with your other hand or use an aide like an elastic band. Once you get comfortable with a pattern, then start using the beat emphasis on the strings like you learned with the drumstick.

This will carry over to your solo playing without any consious effort.
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#22
Part 3

One last thing, you need to feel the beat, and I don't mean the creative emo thing, but with your body, get in the habit of tapping your foot even if your playing to backing or a metronome. This in the one thing that most people find easier to do with fast or moderate tempo songs.
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#23
Slayer

/thread.
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