#1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kjiInFhPeT4&feature=plcp&context=C473584cVDvjVQa1PpcFOurOkHGmoQJ8o89tesmRSXYdp22IK3RpE%3D

at the beginning of vid...

the chords appear to be Dminor, Aminor, and G major. Is this written in D minor? I think it does resolve here ultimately...but I am curious as to where the G major chord came from? (was it just borrowed from parallel Major)?

Also...why does the guitarist choose to play B notes throughout the solo rather than Bbs...I understand accidentals and everything...but like..I am trying to ask why the B note was consciously played even if it is not diatonic rather than some other note ?

Thanksalot for any advice
Last edited by dvm25 at Apr 2, 2012,
#3
Quote by chronowarp
It's in D dorian is why.


ughh these damn modes keep throwing me off.

thanks for the reply...do you have any suggestions for how I can not get so confused between whats being played modally versus non-modally.

I find that every piece I really enjoy seems to be written modally rather than in the more simple Major/minor key...and I remember what you said about modes from another post...but how did those D minor, A minor, and G major chords to you not imply harmonically moving or 'progressing' to a tonal centre rather than being more static.

And I have also really only focused on Major and minor keys...but modes appear to be more common than some lead on?
#4
Well, the determining factor is there aren't that many chords...3 chords, none that define a strong key based tonal center. If you look at the sum of the chords you've got D E F G A B C. It's a typically dorian vamp [i-v-IV].

This stuff isn't that common, but it's not completely abnormal either. I mean it's all in the way it sounds too. I listened to the loop for 5 seconds and I instantly knew what was happening. If you can get to that point it becomes less of a guessing game and trying to match things up on paper, you start to just recognize "that sound".

The key thing here is that you don't have a strong V-I at any point, and it's just a couple chords repeating...repeating...so it is continually reinforcing the same tonic Dm, with the same notes related to it (dorian) with no variation.

If you want to **** your mind a bit...listen to this and tell me what you think...tonality wise.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBH97ma9YiI&ob=av3n

Can you hear the parts where it sounds similar to the video you posted? Can you hear what's different and why it would make it more useful to describe this song as "In the key of 'x' " as opposed to calling it Dorian?
Last edited by chronowarp at Apr 2, 2012,
#5
Quote by chronowarp
Well, the determining factor is there aren't that many chords...3 chords, none that define a strong key based tonal center. If you look at the sum of the chords you've got D E F G A B C. It's a typically dorian vamp [i-v-IV].

This stuff isn't that common, but it's not completely abnormal either. I mean it's all in the way it sounds too. I listened to the loop for 5 seconds and I instantly knew what was happening. If you can get to that point it becomes less of a guessing game and trying to match things up on paper, you start to just recognize "that sound".

The key thing here is that you don't have a strong V-I at any point, and it's just a couple chords repeating...repeating...so it is continually reinforcing the same tonic Dm, with the same notes related to it (dorian) with no variation.


beautifully explained, thankyou

going to really try to engrain this in my head and maybe soon start looking into modes just so I can begin to identifiy the 'sound' as well.

And a question I just thought of...

I listen to alot of metal. And lets just say a rhythm guitar was playing a sequence of power chords on low E string. The chords for example, could even be A5, D5, E5...or I, IV, V (though the abscence of 3rds doesnt really make this a true I, IV, V I think). Obviously, soloing in A minor would work. But could you also play modally here, and if so, what key/scale?

But lets say the chords were D5, E5, F5 in the background...now could soloing over this be approached in a modal way since the background rhythm isnt really implying movement or a strong harmonic function (V-I) at any point? What mode would I use here?

Sorry if these are lame questions, just trying to wrap my head around this!

thanks!
Last edited by dvm25 at Apr 2, 2012,
#6
Quote by chronowarp
Well, the determining factor is there aren't that many chords...3 chords, none that define a strong key based tonal center. If you look at the sum of the chords you've got D E F G A B C. It's a typically dorian vamp [i-v-IV].

This stuff isn't that common, but it's not completely abnormal either. I mean it's all in the way it sounds too. I listened to the loop for 5 seconds and I instantly knew what was happening. If you can get to that point it becomes less of a guessing game and trying to match things up on paper, you start to just recognize "that sound".

The key thing here is that you don't have a strong V-I at any point, and it's just a couple chords repeating...repeating...so it is continually reinforcing the same tonic Dm, with the same notes related to it (dorian) with no variation.

If you want to **** your mind a bit...listen to this and tell me what you think...tonality wise.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IBH97ma9YiI&ob=av3n

Can you hear the parts where it sounds similar to the video you posted? Can you hear what's different and why it would make it more useful to describe this song as "In the key of 'x' " as opposed to calling it Dorian?


hmmm it definitely sounds like the intro isnt progressing...like it isnt taking you on a journey so to speak...lol. It just kinda sticks around to one main feel...almost to the point where the listener wants it to move along? But it doesnt? Am i way off here?

Also, I think the chords are all found in G Major...making this A Dorian then I think if its written in a mode.

I am not sure whats happening during the "this is what you get part"...and towards the later half of the song.
Last edited by dvm25 at Apr 2, 2012,
#7
I actually thought the progression was in C major, the C not being played....
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#8
Alan, if you saw just a Dm7 G7 vamp would you call it D dorian (i IV) or C major (ii V)?
Just curious, Im not sure how I would think myself, but I'd play the same notes over it either way.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#9
Quote by Hydra150
Alan, if you saw just a Dm7 G7 vamp would you call it D dorian (i IV) or C major (ii V)?
Just curious, Im not sure how I would think myself, but I'd play the same notes over it either way.


In that situation, I'd approach it as "dorian" and really not care whether it really is dorian or not.

I guess this progression is just so similar to the Brokeback Mountain theme http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OjSTiUgsEpU that I just go with C.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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