#1
Hi UG.
In the past i've been using the chord identification exercises from www.musictheory.net.
But the thing is, i only have to answer if its a Major, Minor, Diminished Chord etc. and not actually name the chordtones.
I know it may seem irrelevant, but i'd prefer to name the "whole chord".
Is there any software or similiar to musictheory.net, that requires me to identify everything including the tone of the chord?

Thanks in advance!
#2
Doesnt the tool on that site ask you to name the root?
If you want testing beyond that then I dont know any tools other than combining your instrument, a pen and paper and your imagination to come up with your own way of testing yourself.

edit: Also you could combine the lessons from that site, breaking up your study time using the note recognition, chord recognition and interval recognition tools.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Apr 2, 2012,
#3
Quote by Hydra150
Doesnt the tool on that site ask you to name the root?
If you want testing beyond that then I dont know any tools other than combining your instrument, a pen and paper and your imagination to come up with your own way of testing yourself.

Ufortunately not.
I guess i could come up with some exercises myself, though a tool would be preferable.

Quote by Hydra150
edit: Also you could combine the lessons from that site, breaking up your study time using the note recognition, chord recognition and interval recognition tools.

Yes, but that's what im already doing. Would be neat to have them combined.
#4
Quote by KrisHQ
Ufortunately not.
I guess i could come up with some exercises myself, though a tool would be preferable.


Yes, but that's what im already doing. Would be neat to have them combined.

Dont you kind of need to know the root of the chord to know weather or not its major minor or diminished?

I mean in the key of C a c major triad a B diminished triad and a D minor triad all look the same the only difference is where they are located on the staff.....
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#5
Quote by krypticguitar87
Dont you kind of need to know the root of the chord to know weather or not its major minor or diminished?

I mean in the key of C a c major triad a B diminished triad and a D minor triad all look the same the only difference is where they are located on the staff.....

Yes, but it just worries me, that i might just be lucky sometimes and getting the right answer, although it might have been wrong in terms of the root.
I feel the other way would be beneficial when it comes to writing down chords on a staff, already knowing the rootnotes and their position.
I can do that already, but i'd like to get faster at it, and therefore i think this kind of tool would help me
#6
I reckon the best 'tool' woul be to simply read and play actual music on your instrument. Learn by doing.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Apr 3, 2012,
#7
Likw Hydra says just keep practicing....
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.