#1
Hi folks,

I want to upgrade my current speaker to a Celestion Super 8, but as the title suggests the output is rated at 4 ohms. I also can't find a 4 ohm version of the Super 8.

Can I safely install an 8 ohm speaker, what would the downsides be except for a loss in volume?

More importantly: would an 8 ohm resistor in parallel with the speaker solve the mismatch problem?
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#3
Quote by end_citizen
First off, what the amp? The answer is different between tube and solid state amps.


It's a Crate 15W ss. I like the cleans, takes pedals well, good for practice.

Quote by end_citizen

Secondly, please don't use a resistor.


OK, if it makes you feel happier.
Dear God, do you actually answer prayers?

Yes, but only in a way indistinguishable from random luck or the result of your own efforts.
#4
Solid state?
Doesn't matter. Go nuts.

It will be quieter, but I'm guessing you're not using it for gigging anyway. I'd just use the 8 ohm speaker and leave it at that.

Any reason you want the Super 8? It's probably not much better than the stock speaker. Weber makes a bunch of 8" speakers that are going to be a lot better, and they're not exactly expensive. $25 for a ceramic signature 8, $45 for an Alnico blue dog. Lots of others to choose from if neither of those sound good to you. Actually, with some of those Webers you might end up with more volume than before since they're more efficient speakers.
#5
The stock speaker is manufactured by SLM electronics. It sounds fine, but then again I have nothing else to compare it to (in the same category, of course).
The Super 8 is quite cheap so I thought it would be an easy upgrade, but other than that I have no clue what would be better.
Dear God, do you actually answer prayers?

Yes, but only in a way indistinguishable from random luck or the result of your own efforts.
#6
You can certainly use the 8 ohm speaker. Your circuit may not be 100% efficient, but I don't think you're going to notice a huge volume difference.

If you used a resistor though, half of your signal would be dissipated through that resistor. So you would notice a large volume drop.

Hope that helps.


EDIT: Beaten to the punch. I agree with Roc. Weber speakers rule.
Last edited by end_citizen at Apr 3, 2012,
#7
Going 8 ohm on a circuit designed for 4 ohm will never cause you a problem. That's like driving to Grandma's in a Super Sport muscle car. You're not going to hurt it doing something like that. Now hooking a 4 ohm speaker up to a circuit designed for an 8 ohm load? That's the opposite. You might blow your amp up doing that...

Another option you'd have is to get TWO 8-ohm speakers and wire them in parallel. Might not make much difference in volume, but would give you more flexibility with mic positions, etc. (You could play with phase, stereo miking, and so on.)
#8
Quote by Floss Ninja
Going 8 ohm on a circuit designed for 4 ohm will never cause you a problem. That's like driving to Grandma's in a Super Sport muscle car. You're not going to hurt it doing something like that. Now hooking a 4 ohm speaker up to a circuit designed for an 8 ohm load? That's the opposite. You might blow your amp up doing that...

Another option you'd have is to get TWO 8-ohm speakers and wire them in parallel. Might not make much difference in volume, but would give you more flexibility with mic positions, etc. (You could play with phase, stereo miking, and so on.)



This is a good generalization for solid state circuits. Though many will quote the minimum speaker impedance allowed.

For tube circuits the opposite is true. Any load put on the output side of the transformer is reflected back to the primary side. Too large of a load will cause the tubes to work so much harder to drive current through the transformer. This can result in destruction of tubes and transformer. This is why tube amps use a switching output jack. If you forget to plug something in, the energy gets sent to ground rather being built up in the transformer windings.
#9
I'll look into these Webers then, although I understand they're difficult to find in Europe.
Dear God, do you actually answer prayers?

Yes, but only in a way indistinguishable from random luck or the result of your own efforts.