#1
So I am trying to make a trade for one of those 70's tele P bass mudbucker squiers. I've been reading about them and a few people said they are like 24k pickups. I know mudbuckers generally are, but a few also said they are extremely powerful, and unless you lower the pole pieces, and the pickup or even remove pole pieces, they felt their speakers would be ruined. Anyone played one/felt this way?

Now I am curious, People use active basses with high output, EB-0 basses have similar pickup output being mudbuckers, and some companies offer overwound pickups. Are these all meant to be used in the like -10db input switch?

Also on guitar people extol the virtue low output pickups for the better cleans and less prone to fizz overdrive etc.

How does that work on bass? As far as I know, extra windings beefs up the low mids/bass while sucking some bright as you wind more. So does that mean it actually can make a good bass pickup still?
#3
I don't know how helpful this is, but it's super easy to wire a coil tap or series/parallel switch on that squier, if you're worried about insane output and a lack of good cleans with it, you could could install a switch and have the single-coil mode on tap and cut the output in the process. Give it a google or cruise TB for info on the mod. If you're worried about not enough brightness, this is a nice way to add some instant top end to the bass at the flip of a switch at the cost of "thinning out" the sound and losing the humbucker.

I say trade for it and see if it works well or not--it'd be really easy to just wire in a resistor on a switch to make a built in pad if nothing else. Combine that with another toggle for the single/humbucker mode and you get a much more dynamic bass for $3 in extra parts and two holes drilled into the pickguard. I've been jonesing for one of these basses, but haven't seen one come up used locally.
Last edited by dullsilver_mike at Apr 3, 2012,
#4
Quote by dullsilver_mike
I don't know how helpful this is, but it's super easy to wire a coil tap or series/parallel switch on that squier, if you're worried about insane output and a lack of good cleans with it, you could could install a switch and have the single-coil mode on tap and cut the output in the process. Give it a google or cruise TB for info on the mod. If you're worried about not enough brightness, this is a nice way to add some instant top end to the bass at the flip of a switch at the cost of "thinning out" the sound and losing the humbucker.

I say trade for it and see if it works well or not--it'd be really easy to just wire in a resistor on a switch to make a built in pad if nothing else. Combine that with another toggle for the single/humbucker mode and you get a much more dynamic bass for $3 in extra parts and two holes drilled into the pickguard. I've been jonesing for one of these basses, but haven't seen one come up used locally.


I'd read about that, and planned on a few "instant EQ change switches" like series/parallel, cap stuff, maybe even a diode fuzz.

I was curious if the stuff I read was true, that a high output bass pickup was actually capable of shredding even a bass speaker.

Also just curious if people preferred or felt differently about overwound bass pickups compared to guitar. I got a P bass last Thursday and was looking at the GFS vintage and overwound sets.
#5
Fear not. Hot pickups cannot damage your speakers, your amplifier or anything else. If you want hot pickups, then by all means, go for them. They'll cause your amp to distort a bit more easily, and some people like that. After all, that's why the pickup companies make them. Guitarists love hot pickups that distort their amps, while a lot of bassists prefer a clean sound. But if you're into punk, metal or heavy rock, then a hot pickup in your bass might be the way to go.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#6
Quote by FatalGear41
Fear not. Hot pickups cannot damage your speakers, your amplifier or anything else. If you want hot pickups, then by all means, go for them. They'll cause your amp to distort a bit more easily, and some people like that. After all, that's why the pickup companies make them. Guitarists love hot pickups that distort their amps, while a lot of bassists prefer a clean sound. But if you're into punk, metal or heavy rock, then a hot pickup in your bass might be the way to go.


Ok, I figured, but there were some people on talkbass talking some doom about that bass, and how it could destroy your speakers.

I should have known better, but I was just flabbergasted that a pickup could fart out a speaker to death, and people were actually cutting the output but digging the pole pieces out.

Of course after much searching I think I need this bass and will be using it as my low B bass for one big thud, good thing I got my Russian muff working again. Just can't get into my 70's VM squier Jazz bass, and I think it's an even trade.

Edit: Just a thought, What if I also used my EHX mole and OC-3?
Last edited by askrere at Apr 4, 2012,
#7
Quote by askrere
Ok, I figured, but there were some people on talkbass talking some doom about that bass, and how it could destroy your speakers.

I should have known better, but I was just flabbergasted that a pickup could fart out a speaker to death, and people were actually cutting the output but digging the pole pieces out.

Of course after much searching I think I need this bass and will be using it as my low B bass for one big thud, good thing I got my Russian muff working again. Just can't get into my 70's VM squier Jazz bass, and I think it's an even trade.

Edit: Just a thought, What if I also used my EHX mole and OC-3?


It still shouldn't damage your amp, if that is what you mean. If your pedals massively overload your speakers with gain, feedback or whatever, just dial back the preamp gain a bit. By and large, you really have to work at frying a set of speakers. That people do it as often as they do is a testament to stupidity, rather than to bad speaker construction.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#8
Quote by FatalGear41
It still shouldn't damage your amp, if that is what you mean. If your pedals massively overload your speakers with gain, feedback or whatever, just dial back the preamp gain a bit. By and large, you really have to work at frying a set of speakers. That people do it as often as they do is a testament to stupidity, rather than to bad speaker construction.


Mean speakers I know you can't kill an amp, though valves will burn out I guess.
#9
Your speakers are safe. Now, there is one rare exception. Some extremely high-end basses (read: Alembic) come with either an on-board or external preamp that is necessary to power their unique pickups. The pickups are as weak as hell, but the preamps are insanely powerful. That could blow your speakers because the signal would be so powerful. The pickups won't do it, but that monster preamp will. Back in the 1970's Alembic offered an onboard guitar preamp called a Stratoblaster. I put one in an SG and it was like plugging a second amplifier into the signal chain. Alembic had to discontinue the thing because it did too much damage to amps and speakers. But even then, if you dial back the gain, you'd be fine. And if you've got the vast amount of bucks needed for a high-end Alembic with an off-board rackmount preamp, then you probably wouldn't spend a lot of time hanging around here. You'd be too busy playing.

Rock on!
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
Last edited by FatalGear41 at Apr 4, 2012,