#1
Ok here’s the scenario that I always run into while working on new songs in my DAW. I use Logic Pro, which I’ve used for years and it’s great. The music that I work on tends to have a mix of lead guitar and lead synth either together or taking turns as the main lead. The problem, however, comes more so with the guitar. I’ve never been fully satisfied with the sound of my guitar recorded. I’m just too picky but after a while I just live with what I have and move on before my head explodes. As I make a guitar track, I might use an echo for the intro, then add something for the verse, something else for the chorus and so on. This is where I need some advice. Sometimes the effects will make the guitar sound like a completely different instrument, which makes sense, but I’m not sure if it’s better to automate effects of the guitar on same track or give each guitar sound its’ own track. So, should I have a less guitar tracks but with more effects and automation on it OR individual guitar tracks per section? I know there isn’t a right answer so I’m looking for opinion/advice here.
#2
It depends on how stable your system is with automation, etc. The advantage of multiple tracks is you can work with EQ separately, which is difficult to automate.
#3
My view is that it comes down to organization and being able to work with the resulting tracks. Having a bunch of effects on a single track might make it harder to keep straight what is going on. I prefer to use a new track for each application/type of sound. Helps me be able to label things for the future.
#4
if you can work with more tracks i would definitely go for that option. however if your mix has a lot of tracks, i would try to consolidate it more. maybe try to find a balance between having tracks to work with, but not too many so as to make a mess
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#5
Personally, I usually use different tracks for different parts when I'm recording, that way as well as using different effects, I can also use different guitars as well as making it easier when you want different EQ or volume for different parts of a song.

I very often end up with 6-8 tracks just for the rhythm guitar. It works for me, you should try it and see how you get on - a big part of the fun of home recording is the experimentation!
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#6
i consolidate tracks where it makes sense, but i tend to use different tracks for different parts most of the time. if all i am doing is going from a dry sound to something with one or two effects (but the same base tone) then automation make sense. if you are going to a completely new tone, start up a new track.

now, if youve got the same base sound, like the same guitar, amp, eq, etc., but want to heavily change the effects to it, theres another thing to try. you could have a single track with audio, and send it to a bunch of other tracks. automate the send so it only goes to one at a time (mute the send, or the track) and have different sets of effects on your tracks.
i think this would only make sense if you were playing the part straight through, so it was a single audio track and not multiple takes. but it might be worth trying.