#1
and no significant change in my playing. i've got better at certain aspects of my playing, such as chord knowledge and how quickly i can change between them and theory, however i want to be able to solo quickly and freely across the fretboard, im not talking about shredding, just fast paced soloing, black sabbath, led zep, ac/dc sort of speed. anyone got any tips/techniques i should integrate into my practicing? i practice about an hour-2 hours a day but i have no structure in my practicing
#2
Hmmm what got me really good at learning classic rock solos was to just throw on some classic rock songs and tastefully improv solo to the entire song. I mostly base around pentatonic, but scales that are 3 notes per string sound really cool when used properly. As you improvise the solos you'll learn a lot about keys, as well as what sounds good where. it'll also help with your phrasing and finesse.

Hope this helps!
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#3
Just keep practising. I don't know what skills you practise so I can't give any constructive ways to get better without you being all "I already do that!!! *dies*".
7 months also doesn't really mean anything either, some people learn quicker than others, or you could just be going around the learning experience wrong. from the sounds of it I'm guessing you do self teach (or you would ask your teacher, not us) so you DO have to make sure you go about it in the right way.
I'm self taught, I was lucky enough to have done it correctly and lucky for you, alot of the learning material I used should be on UG.

Learn songs, try new techniques.

If you are finding something easy and/or quick to learn then up the game. Find something you can't play or do and just practise it until you CAN do it.
Obviously, don't make the skill jump stupidly high eg. from Tom Delonge to Alexi Laiho is too much.
When I was eleven I broke the patio window and my mother sued me... She's always been a very aggressive litigator.
#4
To start moving around the neck, use the natural minor scale shape, not pentatonic, this allows you to move slightly, once you can do that, mix it with the same scale but on the 5th string.. for example starting on the 12th on the E string on the 7th on the A string, this gives you a nice for frets to play with
#5
You are saying there is no structure in your practice session? My first question would be, "What are you practicing within those two hours?". That is very important! If you are just chillin on the couch and just doodling, then that is not practice...that is doodling.

Some real good improv practice is to learn your pentatonic scales; all 5 positions, and the minor blues. Practice these to a metronome slowly until you have them perfect. Once your fingers and brain are trained, you will be able to move more freely.

After you get that down, start with some simple I-IV-V blues riffs. Pick any key and experiment. Listen to players and learn little licks, improv to a Black Sabbath or AC/DC song.

Remember, have fun with everything. By the way, there is nothing wrong with doodling in front of the TV...I do it when I am cooling down or relaxing.

-ancientson
"Is all that we see or seem, but a dream within a dream?"
#6
With impro there is no shortcut really. You just gotta keep doing it. Same with ear training. The two are very closely interlinked. If you work out solos by ear, you're own solos will get better as you will be able to hear something in your head and have it come out your hands.