#1
Hey guys,

Well i understand that the 2nd position of the major scale can be played at like dorian , and 3rd phrygian or what not.

But for example ifs im playing B Dorian backing track and i wanna use dorian mode would i just use the 2nd position of the major scale over that one spot where the root is on the 6th string or what? plz help
#2
your exactly right. when you want to play in B dorian all you have to do is take the 2nd position of the major scale (which is dorian mode) and start it on the root note B.
#3
If the backing indicates that you are in B Dorian, then you can play the C major scale shape all over the fretboard and still be in B Dorian. Your starting note doesn't matter.
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#4
wow thanks guys i was wondering why it was working lol.

NOW THE HARD PART LOL

getting used to using all these new note sounds in the mode

I know my question was answered already but any tips?
#5
If the backing track is in B dorian, play the notes of B dorian and you are playing B dorian.

If that's a little confusing, learn what notes are in B dorian.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#6
I think you should reconsider how you think about scales. Scales are not positions or shapes, they are notes - and notes are all over the fretboard. You can play absolutely any scale absolutely anywhere on the neck (with a small amount of stretching in some cases), scales can be formed in a multitude of ways on the fretboard, as long as the notes you are fretting are within the scale.

Think in terms of notes (or scale formulas), not shapes.

What notes are in the B Dorian scale? B C# D E F# G# A.
Look at this diagram;

All instances of the notes B C# D E F# G# and A are in the B dorian scale, therefore it makes no sense to be bound by positions or be stuck in the one spot at the sixth fret.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#8
Uuh, what? I was using your example of B dorian from your first post.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#10
Quote by IbanezMan989
wouldnt it be A dorian? since the ionian mode is starting on G?


The colored notes are just notes without accidentals. It would've been better if the fretboard would have lit up for the notes you would be using, but its just an example of where the notes are in standard tuning.

The coloring just shows you the natural notes, and no, the Ionian mode is starting on C in that case, G would be Mixolydian.
#11
haha your right! sorry bud, i guess that means i can use mixolydian over something major?
#12
Quote by Life Is Brutal
The colored notes are just notes without accidentals. It would've been better if the fretboard would have lit up for the notes you would be using, but its just an example of where the notes are in standard tuning.


Yeah sorry I do realise that that diagram is kinda unsightly for trying to visualise a scale, you can find plenty other versions of the same thing by searching google for 'fretboard diagram', perhaps even print one out and colour in certain notes.
I also like to use the fretboard scale display thing in GuitarPro.


Quote by IbanezMan989
haha your right! sorry bud, i guess that means i can use mixolydian over something major?


Nah- if you try to use, say, the G mixolydian mode over a C major progression then you will not be playing the G mixolydian mode, you will be playing the C major scale.
The harmonic background is what defines the scale/mode.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Apr 4, 2012,
#13
It would be a good idea to completely disregard the study of, and anything you think you know about, modes for a good while until you have a very firm grasp of tonal music theory. Modes just tent to confuse people and their application is fairly rare unless you play certain types of jazz or are really into medieval church music.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Apr 4, 2012,
#14
HEY GUYS I GOTTA TELL YOU SOMETHING

I originally was looking at each position as like 1 entity after the other!

But its sooooo much easy to see it as 1 whole connected thing!!! SO MUCH EASIER
#15
Quote by IbanezMan989
HEY GUYS I GOTTA TELL YOU SOMETHING

I originally was looking at each position as like 1 entity after the other!

But its sooooo much easy to see it as 1 whole connected thing!!! SO MUCH EASIER


BrilliantShmashingAwesomeCongratulationsCoolEpiphanyBro
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#17
Modes are probably the wrong way to look at this. Instead of looking at it as the second position of the major scale, you should look at it as B minor with a natural sixth. B, C♯, D, E, F♯, G, A are the notes in B minor, so what are they in B dorian? B C# D E F# G# A. If you don't have all the notes in all the major and minor keys memorized (or at least how to construct them quickly) forget about modes.