#1
This is going to sound incredibly newbish, so bear with me...

I really don't even know what it's called, but it's what guitarists do to stop the strings from ringing out after strumming them, so the sound is short. Like, strumming and then stopping the strings with your picking hand. It's what the girl is doing in this video around 1:00

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-293WtTRbEc&list=FL0f7vIOIzPIhuOLNtrNAv3w&index=2&feature=plpp_video

She refers to it as 'stop'... so i did a search on 'how to play a stop on guitar' and similar searches, but nothing relevant came up.

Anyone know what it's called? It creates a kind of sound I like very much, but it proving to be a bitch to get down. Since I don't know what to call it, I can't find anything to help me learn it.
Last edited by LucidDreem at Apr 5, 2012,
#2
Muting

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#3
yes hes right... more specifically palm muting, because you can also mute with your fingers
#4
That's what I thought, but all the searches I ran about palm mutes only gave results teaching the kind of mute where I rest the side of my hand near the bridge to soften the tone. What I mean is playing a normal down or up strum, then abruptly hitting the strings and not allowing them to vibrate and continue the sound.
#5
uh I think what you mean is play a chord then, use your picking hand to stop the strings from vibrating, this is done by puting you hand against the strings and applying slight pressure. this stops the strings from vibrating thus stopping the sound, however you can also do this by slightly releasing your fretted note also causing the strings from vibrating....
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Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#6
It sounds like the word you're looking for is 'staccato'. Krypticguitar's description of how to do it is spot on. Personally, I'd say use both of the techniques he/she explained. It'll give it a really sharp, immediate end.

Good luck.
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#7
Quote by DaysofGrace
It sounds like the word you're looking for is 'staccato'. Krypticguitar's description of how to do it is spot on. Personally, I'd say use both of the techniques he/she explained. It'll give it a really sharp, immediate end.

Good luck.

Yeah I din't want to say staccato cuz I cant watch the video while I'm at work so I wasn't sure that it was staccato or if it was just stopping the chord from ringing which is why I just gave a description.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#8
Quote by krypticguitar87
Yeah I din't want to say staccato cuz I cant watch the video while I'm at work so I wasn't sure that it was staccato or if it was just stopping the chord from ringing which is why I just gave a description.


I figured you knew what you were talking about.
"This nightmare's gonna break me.
Please, Daylight, save me..."
#10
Anyone have any advice or links to sites teaching you how to play staccato with open chords?

There's plenty info on google for single notes (just lift your fret fingers, or touch your picking fingers back on the strings is pretty common)... but there's surprisingly almost no info on how to play staccato with open chords on an acoustic.
#11
Quote by krypticguitar87
... use your picking hand to stop the strings from vibrating, this is done by puting you hand against the strings and applying slight pressure. this stops the strings from vibrating thus stopping the sound...


This exactly. My advice is to hold your pick like you normally do, but extend your middle, ring, and pinky fingers out rather than have them curled in. It gives you the full length of your hand to do what krypticguitar said.
"This nightmare's gonna break me.
Please, Daylight, save me..."
#12
Yeah, now that I read it again it seems right. Is this something that's supposed to be incredibly hard to do fast? In the video I posted, she's using the technique you described (it looks like), but at monster speed. I can get it down if I go slowly, but any faster- and the tempo for the intro is fast- and it just falls apart.
#13
Quote by LucidDreem
Yeah, now that I read it again it seems right. Is this something that's supposed to be incredibly hard to do fast? In the video I posted, she's using the technique you described (it looks like), but at monster speed. I can get it down if I go slowly, but any faster- and the tempo for the intro is fast- and it just falls apart.


Watched the video, so basically, she's not really muting with her left string ala funk-rhythm by slightly releasing the pressure on the strings.

She is palm muting, but really shes killing the notes ( I guess you could say its staccato) by, after strumming the chord, she rests her wrist on the bridge.

Practice it slow, don't worry about how fast she is playing it, remember if you do something sloppy it will come out sloppy. try to really focus on your right hand, where it lands as far as the pick goes. especially with that A minor chord, you don't want to play the low E (1st string) you want the first chord to be played to be the A string (2nd string). So really try to focus on trying to get your pick to land on the first string of the chord your playing. Take your time and best of luck man!