#2
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1208630
as for recording them, dynamic mics are generally your friend and a medium sized room will do.
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Last edited by kcorkcar at Apr 5, 2012,
#3
For performing, it depends on what kind of vocals you're wanting to do. Their are 2 kinds - Fry and False Chord (and inhales, but... yuck ).

Fry is used on most of what you hear in "mainstream" metal; it is generally lower volume, and has less power. It can be very thin sounding, especially on airy sounding condenser mics. The reason you see most vocalists cupping their mic live, is because their vocals don't have the power to sound "big," without shoving their mouth right up against the grille, and directing all airflow into it.

False chords have much more power behind them. They are what most death metal guys use, and most any band that has brutal lows. The most main stream I can think of that does it, is Jesse Leach (original vocalist from Killswitch Engage, and the "new" vocalist for them now). You can make them sound fairly close to fry, with practice, and they are far less threatening to your vocal chords. Once you understand how to do them, and find your trigger to hit them, you should be able to progress fairly quickly. There's a lot of good videos on YouTube, if you search around. Fry is much harder to master, and really isn't worth it IMO, it can really damage your voice if your technique is even slightly off (and probably still will, if it is correct).

Still, I tend to prefer a nice condenser to a dynamic for most vocalists. The SM7b sounds great for screams, but it's really bland, unless you're using a great mic pre IMO. It works on practically anything, but it's not particularly exciting to listen to. The one thing the SM7b has is, a lot of metal vocalists like to move around while they're tracking, and really get into it - At that point, a condenser is pretty much worthless, because it's going to pick up all the movements and give you funny results, if you're moving around a lot and not tracking from a similar position for the whole performance. The SM7b can be held in the hand of the vocalist, just like they would hold their mic on stage.

Not sure what your budget is, but that'll have a lot to do with what mic I'd recommend. I've been using an AT4060 and Neumann TLM103 for vocals lately, but now I've moved on to a Shure KSM44, which I got yesterday and so far I LOVE it.
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#4
On a purely recording note I have found a dynamic microphones to outstrip condensers when it comes to screaming and distorted vocals. Not exactly sure why but I feel it has something to do with the more 'focused' range of the microphone, as in it can often pick up less of your chest rumble which can give the screams more definition without post processing.
#5
thanks for the input so far guys

MatrixClaw, I actually did a little recording with some peavey mics I could find :P I'll see what I can work out of it. I am not really planning on recording a bunch of these so just for a few minutes it'll do the job this way I think

anyways any advice on post-processing screams?


also I found somewhere in the internet this line about recording that's kind of funny "basically think of a scream vocalists as guitar cabinets"
#6
Quote by Vendetta V
thanks for the input so far guys

MatrixClaw, I actually did a little recording with some peavey mics I could find :P I'll see what I can work out of it. I am not really planning on recording a bunch of these so just for a few minutes it'll do the job this way I think

anyways any advice on post-processing screams?


also I found somewhere in the internet this line about recording that's kind of funny "basically think of a scream vocalists as guitar cabinets"


Distort/Overdrive slightly to make the scream a bit more intense. Be careful though cause it can sound artifical fast if there is too much distortion or room sounds start to distort.
#7
^ i run my screams/growls into my la610 with about 3 db of gain and that gives it a little grit without making it sound unnatural. check out no "sunlight" that was just me into a shure 10a into my la610 and a bit of eq'ing, tiny bit of delay and double tracking. like any other part of recording the less you have to do to get the sound you want after recording, the better it's going to sound.