#1
So I've read a lot of books, watched rockumentaries and interviews on a lot of bands, and artists. One thing I've noticed is like every band from Nirvana to Kyuss (Scott Reeder says he uses a lot of kiss licks in his fills) and beyond seems to say they spent their youth listening to Kiss and they inspired them either to play guitar, drum or bass it up.

As far as I can tell they seem like a campy ridiculous glam group, in the vein of Alice Cooper. So what am I missing, how did Kurt Cobain or Scott Reeder find inspiration in that band? Is Gene Simmons actually capable of some solid bass lines?

I never really listened to them, they just seemed to goofy, so if there is an untapped gold mine of bass tone and style I'm missing please let me know.
#2
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in the vein of Alice Cooper

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#3
Yes, Kiss has turned out a few good bass lines over the years. I say Kiss because Paul Stanley wrote and played a number of the bass lines instead of Gene Simmons; particularly on the Love Gun album. The most notable Kiss bass line is Black Diamond off of the first album. One of the most curious things about it is that despite its different tempo, it is remarkably similar to the bass line to Pink Floyd's Money. Given that Kiss and Dark Side of the Moon were released only a few months apart, one has to wonder who came up with it first. Other notable Kiss bass lines are 100,000 Years, Detroit Rock City (Simmons claims he came up with it after listening to Curtis Mayfield's Freddie's Dead off of the Superfly soundtrack), Deuce and Rock and Roll All Night. Simmons is not known for a lot of complicated lines, but he is more capable than he often lets on. He doesn't do himself any favors by stating in interviews that he isn't interested in focusing on technique.

Kiss was not a band known for tone. Rather, they were known for being ungodly loud. I've heard a few loud rock bands in my day, and none of them came close to the volume level of a Kiss concert. They always put the show above everything else, and at a time when most rock concerts weren't much to write home about, Kiss was definitely in a league of their own. A lot of what bands have done since the 1970s is based on things Kiss did and still does. Love them or hate them, they've had a hell of an impact and they put on a first-rate show.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#4
Quote by FatalGear41
They always put the show above everything else, and at a time when most rock concerts weren't much to write home about, Kiss was definitely in a league of their own. A lot of what bands have done since the 1970s is based on things Kiss did and still does. Love them or hate them, they've had a hell of an impact and they put on a first-rate show.


Ok that's kind of what I assumed. Having been born in 1990, and my mom a country fan and dad who stopped listening to music after Frampton and Bread, I wasn't really keen on music early in life lol so I basically started listening to music only like 2-3 years before I took up playing it.

It's obvious they are a show band, I mean you don't dress up to slack off. I guess I just never really got into that anthem rock big arena style music, so most of those bands save a little Queen (not that queen is like kiss per se) blew past me, then to see all these guys in fast punk, grunge etc saying they were fond of kiss baffled me. But I guess the sheer volume, pyrotechnics and display of a band in such a massive arena was enticing to young rockers, so while they might not themselves done persona's and platform battle boots, they still realized they could turn up and rock out.

I do like their song God of Thunder, except that weird kids voice that sounds like it was sampled from an anime.
#5
Most of my friends younger brothers were Kiss fans. When I was in High School, they were huge with the under 15 year old guys. They were highly theatrical and mixed comic book visuals with some of the loudest rock possible. Cobain and others fit well in the timeline for getting on board the Kiss bandwagon.
#6
Both Gene Simmons and Paul Stanley stated the Beatles as their main musical inspiration, Gene Simmons stating Paul McCartney as his main instrumental influence. As wild and cheezy may their act be, they are both highly criitical as too how tight and intricate rock should sound like and thus of their own musical performance. They took recording and performing VERY seriously, paying attention to the finest details. Only on few occasions would they leave recording "accidents" reach the mix, leaving only those which overall impact had a better effect than a fix.

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Last edited by ColdGin at Apr 6, 2012,
#8
This thread is a year and a half old. Let it die, man. Let it die.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#9
Old thread.

But I do really like many of Gene's basslines, especially on the first albums. I'm pretty sure everybody played their own instruments on the first albums (they were pretty much recorded live). Later they started using studio musicians on some songs and Ace or Paul sometimes played some basslines. Gene even played the guitar on some songs.

He may not have been technically that great but his basslines are pretty melodic. Listen to "Going Blind" for example.
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#10
Quote by biggsy59
Simmons, another one who made a contract with the beast.


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