#1
I met with a guy who wants some recording done. He has a thin kind of nasally voice. Any mic recommendations? I heard this is something the SM58 is useful for in the studio. I can't get anything super expensive, but around $100-$300 would be nice for now. The dude said he would pay me and help get any equipment needed to record him. Which really I may not need anything and just fudge it with EQ (I would rather not do and would prob sound like crap).

I have a Behringer C-1 mic that does boost the lows quite a bit (normally I have to cut a bit on whenever I use it). Maybe this will be perfect for this person? I should also point out before buying it I have access to a wide range of mics, so just throw out some ideas and I can go look around and see if I can find one :p
#2
I would say try him with whatever you normally use for vocals first, there's always the possibility that he might sound fine in a full mix.
I deeply regret the 6661 in my username. Siiiigh. Damn you, 14 year old me, you edgy little bastard.
#3
Quote by Carl6661
I would say try him with whatever you normally use for vocals first, there's always the possibility that he might sound fine in a full mix.

This is true. I may just stick him real close to the mic and see what it sounds like with an instrumental. I was stand like 4-5 feet away when I was listening to him a capella
#4
Quote by FireHawk
This is true. I may just stick him real close to the mic and see what it sounds like with an instrumental. I was stand like 4-5 feet away when I was listening to him a capella


I'm not sure what you meant by 'real close', but I'd just say just treat it like any other vocal recording. You can't magically change his voice through any magical recording techniques.

Provided he can actually sing well, most people probably wont be bothered about the actual tone of his voice. If he's happy with his voice, and the nasal sound dosen't stand out as being distracting in the mix, you'll be fine. If there is a specific annoying frequency, you should be able to EQ it enough for it to sit nicely anyway.
I deeply regret the 6661 in my username. Siiiigh. Damn you, 14 year old me, you edgy little bastard.
#5
Quote by Carl6661
I'm not sure what you meant by 'real close', but I'd just say just treat it like any other vocal recording. You can't magically change his voice through any magical recording techniques.


well the mic i plan on using for him looses bass response pretty fast (distance wise from the mic) therefore I will push him close to get more bass response.

Its not magical recording technique its just the response of the mic. That and usually when the farther away from a mic the thinner the signal. This will be to make sure nothing is lost in his voice.

i am just going to try using the behringer mic because of the low response that comes from it
#6
Quote by FireHawk
well the mic i plan on using for him looses bass response pretty fast (distance wise from the mic) therefore I will push him close to get more bass response.

Its not magical recording technique its just the response of the mic. That and usually when the farther away from a mic the thinner the signal. This will be to make sure nothing is lost in his voice.

i am just going to try using the behringer mic because of the low response that comes from it


That's totally fair enough, there's no harm in trying it quite close to the microphone if the bass proximity effect on it dies out as quickly as you say. Although I'd be very careful with it, you don't want it being too bassy/muddy sounding.

I would personally just record him like I do any other singer. If he can actually sing well, and is happy with his voice (Which I assume he is, if he's looking to be recorded), there's no point in trying to force the tone of his voice to sound any different to how he sounds naturally. Voices can often sound more 'full' in a mix anyway.
I deeply regret the 6661 in my username. Siiiigh. Damn you, 14 year old me, you edgy little bastard.
Last edited by Carl6661 at Apr 5, 2012,
#7
maybe i should just let him do his thing haha i haven't recorded in a month or so been busy doing music for an indy film lol. i just want to get back to doing my bands music were i have control of the sound :p
#8
That one singer I have mentioned a few times whose voice sounded strident through any mic I threw at her was also thin and nasally. The 58 was the magic bullet for her.

Alternately, consider a LD dynamic like an SM7 or an RE20. Those are the kinds of mics they use for that "big radio announcer" voice.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Buy him a Kazoo
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#10
I'd say a good dynamic is going to be best here, an SM7b or an RE20, as Chris suggested. Condensers tend to hype the highs a bit and make the recording a bit more "excited," this tends to translate to thinnest on some voices, and if you're already working with a thin vocalist, they might not be the best bet. Not saying you can't get decent results, but you might be fighting the mic more and doing a significant amount of EQing afterwards; there are some great "warm" condensers that would work for a voice like that, though, but none I can really think of within your budget.


Quote by FireHawk
well the mic i plan on using for him looses bass response pretty fast (distance wise from the mic) therefore I will push him close to get more bass response.

Its not magical recording technique its just the response of the mic. That and usually when the farther away from a mic the thinner the signal. This will be to make sure nothing is lost in his voice.

i am just going to try using the behringer mic because of the low response that comes from it

Actually, this is kinda a "magical recording technique"

It's called the Proximity Effect, which mainly occurs in cardiod mics, as this article explains:

Proximity effect in audio refers to a change in the frequency response of a directional microphone as the sound source is brought close to the microphone. The result of the change is a disproportionate increase in the bass response of the microphone.


http://ezinearticles.com/?Home-Recording-Tips---Beware-of-Microphone-Proximity-Effect&id=2055810

This may very well be an instance where it's desired, but you might find that the audio becomes too degraded to really work with it in a mix; try it out - You might get good results, if not... the guy's offered to fund the gear, so take advantage of it (I would anyway ).
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