#1
Hello Guys! I want to ask how to create bass lines melodically and how should I practice? I have really no idea where to start.
#2
play within a scale?
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#3
When it comes to melodic playing, I tend to keep a few things in mind.

1) You're still a bassist. That means you need to keep the groove going, locking in with the drums and driving the song forward, leaving space for other instruments where they need it, and generally kicking arse.

2) Melody comes from the Greek word melodia, which means singing/chanting. If you can sing your bassline and it's catchy, then I would say it's a good melodic line.

As for actually creating the line, try and target chord tones (3rds, 6ths, 7ths, and the compound versions of them). It's best if you have a very clear sense of what the bassline is doing, rather than aimlessley grooving.
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#4
You should check out some sheet music that has a vocal melody line, and analyze how they are built up.

And also study scales; I believe there are little booklets that have all scales, available for both bass and guitar.
#5
Study Motown lines--James Jamerson, Bob Babbitt--like Chris said, if you can sing it, its a good sign.

Also, check out some of the "new wave" bass players like Bruce Thomas (Elvis Costello) and Graham Maby (Joe Jackson)
#6
Quote by Nutter_101


2) Melody comes from the Greek word melodia, which means singing/chanting. If you can sing your bassline and it's catchy, then I would say it's a good melodic line.


Ok question. I watched part of a music theory documentary, and it was discussing melody vs rhythm (still sometimes confused by that when it comes to instruments with notes, as well as syncopation). Anyways, you say if you can sing to the bass line it's a good chance it's melodic.

Would cream's say sunshine of your love be melodic? Jack sings the song, and follows the guitar the entire time, but then a lot of music involves the bassist playing the same thing (see like almost all of Nirvanas stuff) but then does that mean stuff from Nirvana is entirely rhythm or devoid of melody accept his vocals until a solo? Then Om, to me he's chanting, but his chanting seems entirely rhythmic not melodic.

I am trying to find time to devote to theory and more musical vocabulary (read an online music dictionary) so sorry if I sound completely retarded.
#7
I'd start with scales, first simple linear ones with ascending and descending notes, and then more complex ones and arpeggios. Blues scales are definitely helpful. This will help you master the fretboard and develop melodic musicality. I think scales and fretboard knowledge really make melodies easier to make up on the spot.

Still, the bass is the grounding element to a band, so groove is first. Groovy fingers or picks plus quick and knowledgable fretboard skills can make a bass player more than just the bottom note.
#8
Just break out for a couple of bars and slide back in the drum pattern

All along this path I tread
My heart betrays my weary head
With nothing but my soul to save
From the cradle to the grave.
#9
Quote by anarkee
Study Motown lines--James Jamerson, Bob Babbitt--like Chris said, if you can sing it, its a good sign.

Also, check out some of the "new wave" bass players like Bruce Thomas (Elvis Costello) and Graham Maby (Joe Jackson)


Will check on it Thanks!

Quote by rp747
I'd start with scales, first simple linear ones with ascending and descending notes, and then more complex ones and arpeggios. Blues scales are definitely helpful. This will help you master the fretboard and develop melodic musicality. I think scales and fretboard knowledge really make melodies easier to make up on the spot.

Still, the bass is the grounding element to a band, so groove is first. Groovy fingers or picks plus quick and knowledgable fretboard skills can make a bass player more than just the bottom note.


Thanks! Also do you know some decent free drum machine to practice on?
#11
i think you'd be better off knowing the intervals, and structure of the scales, rather than the scale drawing on the fretboard... that's how you really know what you're doing, know what note you are playing, why, and what to expect of each note played in whatever scale... fretboard drawing of scales always seemed to me like a way to limit yourself and keep you dumb.. it's not too much effort to know the notes on the fretboard and play them according to the scale, without learning any stupid fret drawing... but maybe that's just me.
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