#1
I'm getting a Hellcat VI. I may get a real bass after that but I'm not sure yet. I like the sound of tube bass amps. Unfortunately, there aren't many out there that are under 100 watts. I'm not looking for headroom. It seems like the Ashdown Little Bastard is like the only one on the market but it's lacking a gain knob. There are plenty of EL84 guitar amps with around that same wattage. I'm wondering whether I can just use something like a Dual Terror with a bass cabinet and get good results. It would be perfect because I can use it as a guitar amp as well.
#3
That would be fine, but the EQ on the head will not be voiced for bass, so you'd have to experiment and maybe try an EQ pedal or rackmount.
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#4
Quote by FatalGear41
You could do that, but only you would be able to determine how it sounds. If you want a low-watt tube bass head, Ashdown's Little Bastard 30 is 30 watts:

http://www.ashdownmusic.com/bass/detail.asp?section=valve&ID=229


I know, but the issue is spending $900 on a bass amp. I'm a guitar player who wants to dabble in the bass range, hence the Bass VI. The whole thing with the bass cab is going to be pretty expensive for something that's not my main gear. But I have no problem spending that money on something I would use for guitar as well. It would be great if I could get a great sounding guitar amp and bass amp with one purchase.
#5
You could get a fender bassman, or another similar bass amp that people commonly use for guitar. it might be a bit more expensive than you're willing to pay
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#6
If you want tube cheap, hard to do. A small amp and sans amp would be simple. Or just buy a bass cab if you have a head.
#7
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MtF0_UpVCJM

Now that compares an Ampeg SVT head (considered the industry standard valve head for bass for a long time) to a Tech21 amp that attempts to model the same sound. They also do a pedal for the same thing, which here retails at about £150 (I'm guessing about $230).

If bass is just a thing on the side for you, considering the price of a proper valve amp versus one of those pedals, and how close they actually sound, I'd say it might be a good option.
#8
Start working a 30 Valve/tube amp hard on a live gig without FOH and you'll soon find a very hot amp.
Bass guitar frequencies require more output power than Guitars do.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#9
If it is for practice/recording and you get a bass speaker cab you won't have problems but it just won't be enough for gigs. Our hearing at bass frequencies isn't as sensitive and you need roughly 10x the power to hear the same volume as a guitar.
#10
Quote by Phil Starr
If it is for practice/recording and you get a bass speaker cab you won't have problems but it just won't be enough for gigs. Our hearing at bass frequencies isn't as sensitive and you need roughly 10x the power to hear the same volume as a guitar.


I thought it was double? most bass amps are 200-500 and most guitarist use 20-100.

According to you I'd need a 1000 watt amp and a giant stack.

A nice fan or with some skill integrated silent PC fan helps. I plan to overhaul my classic 30 to allow for cooler running and increased mids.
#11
Quote by Phil Starr
If it is for practice/recording and you get a bass speaker cab you won't have problems but it just won't be enough for gigs. Our hearing at bass frequencies isn't as sensitive and you need roughly 10x the power to hear the same volume as a guitar.

Yes bit it insn't just your ears, if you took the grills/fronts off of a guitar and a bass cab and played the low string on a bass through a bass cab and then played a guitar using the most used frequencies on a guitar into a guitar cab you see a massive difference between both cabs in cone travel.
This is where a considerable amount of extra output power is required from a Bass amp compared to the less power required to create the minnimul movement in a guitar cab hence more power in the output stage of a bass amp.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#12
I figured that 30W would be fine since the B-15 was 30W. The Bassman was 50W. There's not much difference difference volume wise between 50W and 30W. At a certain point, you're just getting headroom. Headroom isn't something I really need. I've played 8-string guitars through guitar amps and speakers and they work fine. That's only 2 semi-tones away from a bass. The F# string wasn't quieter than the other 7 strings. There's a big difference acoustically but it's not there through the amp. I can't imagine that thicker strings and 3 more inches to the scale length tuned a step down would suddenly require much more power.
#13
Quote by JELIFISH19
I figured that 30W would be fine since the B-15 was 30W. The Bassman was 50W. There's not much difference difference volume wise between 50W and 30W. At a certain point, you're just getting headroom. Headroom isn't something I really need. I've played 8-string guitars through guitar amps and speakers and they work fine. That's only 2 semi-tones away from a bass. The F# string wasn't quieter than the other 7 strings. There's a big difference acoustically but it's not there through the amp. I can't imagine that thicker strings and 3 more inches to the scale length tuned a step down would suddenly require much more power.


Well, if you don't care about headroom, as long as you have a bass cab you should be fine.

But I do think your thinking is rather odd, you are arguing that a bass isn't much different than a guitar, but then admit it is because you know it will hurt your speakers.

If this was for bedrooms and recording or mic'ed live it'd be ok, I assume this is going to be played like a guitar in a metal band? Both the b-15 and Bassman made horrible live bass amps, the bassman is probably 99/100 used as a guitar amp and the b-15 is known for being a recording amp.

So yea, it might work, but you might need to push the thing to the edges for volume, very saturated squished dirty volume.
#14
The reason for the bass cab isn't because it will harm the speakers, it's for better handling of the bottom end. In the 8-strings, I found the bottom end was flubby and lacked kick through a tube amp. The flub was much more manageable with hybrid and solid state amps. That's why a lot of 8-string players use solid state amps. But since I'm not playing metal, I can live with a little flub. I figure that the longer scale length will make it tighter to compensate anyway and the bass cab will give it some punch.

In all honesty, I don't think it would hurt speakers. A lot of people played Bass VIs through guitar amps and speakers. A Twin Reverb seems to be a popular choice but that doesn't really fit my style. Guitars go to bass frequencies all the time. Using a trem goes below an octave down. There are plenty of pedals that will get you an octave lower as well.

I do intend on playing it similar to a guitar. I will play aggressive and I want it to be dirty. But another question popped up. How does fuzz work in this equation?
#15
Quote by JELIFISH19
How does fuzz work in this equation?

Can I presume youl be using an effect for the fuzz? if you are the output stage will see it as a normal signal.
If not and you're ovedriving the input stage the output stage will still see it as a normal signal.
If the output stage starts to break up and produces square waves then you are likely to damage you speakers.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn