#1
can anyone tell me the relation of the pentatonic scale to the major scale? eg in the minor scale the 3rd 6th nd 7th notes are flattened? how can the notes for the Am pentatonic be determined from the Amaj or Aminor scale?
#2
Minor Pentatonic: 1 b3 4 5 b7
Major Pentatonic: 1 2 3 5 6
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#3
Quote by danyal92
can anyone tell me the relation of the pentatonic scale to the major scale? eg in the minor scale the 3rd 6th nd 7th notes are flattened? how can the notes for the Am pentatonic be determined from the Amaj or Aminor scale?

Well a minor scale has a b3 b6 and b7.
Minor pentatonic scales ommit 2nds and 6ths.
So minor pentatonic is a major scale without a 2nd 6th and a flattened 3rd and 7td.
#4
Quote by danyal92
can anyone tell me the relation of the pentatonic scale to the major scale?

The minor pentatonic exists at various points within the major scale. The ii, iii, and vi degrees of the major scale are where you can build the minor pentatonic.

Your A minor pentatonic exists at:

ii in G Major
iii in F Major
vi in C Major
#5
Pentatonic scales are the same as their parent scale with 2 notes missing, bringing the total to 5 (hence, penta). You remove these two notes because they are a semitone (one fret) away from another note in the scale, so they want to move that way. By removing these notes, you remove any chance of these dissonances occuring, and can pretty much hit any note you want and it will sound at least ok.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#6
Quote by mdc
The minor pentatonic exists at various points within the major scale. The ii, iii, and vi degrees of the major scale are where you can build the minor pentatonic.

Your A minor pentatonic exists at:

ii in G Major
iii in F Major
vi in C Major


I'am trying to understand this, what do you mean Amin exists at: ii in G maj, iii in F and so on? Thanks
#7
Quote by danyal92
can anyone tell me the relation of the pentatonic scale to the major scale? eg in the minor scale the 3rd 6th nd 7th notes are flattened? how can the notes for the Am pentatonic be determined from the Amaj or Aminor scale?


have at look at these diagrams and it should be clear...

Major Scale

Major Pentatonic


Compare those, then do the same for minor & minor pentatonic

you can compare the formulas here...

scale formulas
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 9, 2012,
#8
Quote by skilly1
I'am trying to understand this, what do you mean Amin exists at: ii in G maj, iii in F and so on? Thanks

Pentatonic substitution is one of a lot of ways to create different sounds over chords, depending on how you're treating the chord as it relates to it's parent major scale.

The approach works best over static or slow moving progressions.
#9
I've only learnt the minor pentatonic scale and the major scale but not the major pentatonic scale which as has been explained is the major scale minus a couple of notes. Looking at the diagrams it seems the major pentatonic scale first position is the same shape as the 2nd position minor pentatonic scale in relation to the first position major scale and so on if this makes sense
Last edited by skilly1 at Apr 9, 2012,
#10
Quote by skilly1
Looking at the diagrams it seems the major pentatonic scale first position is the same shape as the 2nd position minor pentatonic scale in relation to the first position major scale and so on if this makes sense

Yeah, man. Those two scales are relative to each other, and are the two most important scales you'll need in music.
#11
Cheers, it's slowly making sense. The minor pentatonic makes the most sense to me cause it usually always sounds good improvising and I can usually add a few notes outside of that scale which sometimes sound pretty good