#1
so ive been playing blink stuff for a while. i use a boss me50 on a vox ac15 with an epiphone dot. i had a good tone set up, but now i joined a new band and we're playing heavier pop punk like all time low. they use a lot more distortion, and when i try to set that up on my pedal, i get a lot of noise in the background as well as feedback. i know that some of the feedback is because of my semi hollow body, but what should i change? pedal? amp? Pickups? i have the stock pickups right now, but ya
so to be more specific about the pedal, any setting i put it to, i get a lot of feedback and unwanted noise, even when i put the sound gate all the way up, ask me questions cuz i dont reallly know what else to tell you haha
#2
Well, the feedback is probably the amount of gain you stacked on and the semi-hollow isn't helping.

If you used a noise gate then you really shouldn't have too much unless the gain is really high. Maybe use the pre-amp gain from your ac15 and boost it with and OD or have a bit of crunch added on.

Someone who knows more can probably help you out more. IIRC All Time Low uses a JCM800 (just for tonal reference completely unrelated to this theread). Get a Plimsoul
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#3
Look for a cheap JCM900. They go for peanuts all the time, you just gotta be patient.
Gilchrist custom
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Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
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Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#4
they are very avid users of mesa gear, as well as solid body guitars. so i would be looking into an amp (or amp sim) that is very american (mesa, peavey) as opposed to something so UK voiced. even blink uses mesa amps live. if you have an EQ pedal, try to reduce your 500-800 hz and push up the 250-500 hz. not a ton, just enough to try to change the voicing of the midrange.

as well as maybe a brighter sounding solid body guitar. ive played metal on hollowbodies, but there is a lot of work involved. proper gating, EQ, stage position, muting the guitar when not in use (even if just for seconds), and i taped the F-holes shut to slightly reduce feedback. something like an epi SG or LP would do you a lot of good here. i believe ATL is endorsed by PRS.
#5
so you guys would suggest a change in amp? to either a marshall or a mesa? am i right? i can try to find an eq pedal as well
#6
Go for a Mesa, if you can afford it. If not, try a Randall (you can find an RH150G3 for cheap used, in fact I bought a half stack for $550 used, 4 years ago), those things have a ton of gain, but watch your highs and lows on it. They can get a little out of control, either really harsh or real woofy. If you spend enough time tweaking the EQ, you can get some pretty sick ballsy tones with one.

You can rock a hollowbody for heavier stuff if you use a noise gate, and use other methods to cut out inherent feedback issues from hollowbodies. For years, Ryan Peake from Nickelback's main guitars were a Gibson ES-135 and a ES-335, occasionally loaded with EMGs, and he would fill the hollow portions of the guitars with towels or other fabric to kill the feedback. They can handle serious gain if you do it right, meaning you might not have to change guitars.

Sounds to me like most of your noise problem could be coming from your pedal. Which pedal in particular is it? A lot of distortion boxes are notorious for adding unwanted noise to your signal, as well as feedback. Amp gain is far better for this kind of tone.

Those early Blink songs had a ton of gain on them, and if I'm not mistaken, Tom Delonge uses his newer Gibson ES-333s to play those songs live, even though he used Strats back in the day. I think if you pad the hollow chambers in the Dot, get a noise gate, and found an amp with more low end and crunch than your Vox, you'll be much happier with your sound.
Last edited by dkennedy88 at Apr 7, 2012,
#7
Quote by dkennedy88
Go for a Mesa, if you can afford it. If not, try a Randall (you can find an RH150G3 for cheap used, in fact I bought a half stack for $550 used, 4 years ago), those things have a ton of gain, but watch your highs and lows on it. They can get a little out of control, either really harsh or real woofy. If you spend enough time tweaking the EQ, you can get some pretty sick ballsy tones with one.

You can rock a hollowbody for heavier stuff if you use a noise gate, and use other methods to cut out inherent feedback issues from hollowbodies. For years, Ryan Peake from Nickelback's main guitars were a Gibson ES-135 and a ES-335, occasionally loaded with EMGs, and he would fill the hollow portions of the guitars with towels or other fabric to kill the feedback. They can handle serious gain if you do it right, meaning you might not have to change guitars.

Sounds to me like most of your noise problem could be coming from your pedal. Which pedal in particular is it? A lot of distortion boxes are notorious for adding unwanted noise to your signal, as well as feedback. Amp gain is far better for this kind of tone.

Those early Blink songs had a ton of gain on them, and if I'm not mistaken, Tom Delonge uses his newer Gibson ES-333s to play those songs live, even though he used Strats back in the day. I think if you pad the hollow chambers in the Dot, get a noise gate, and found an amp with more low end and crunch than your Vox, you'll be much happier with your sound.

right now my pedal is a boss me-50, its a multi fx pedal and its definitely causing a lot of my noise, my bandmate was saying i should opt for a marshall stack, an hdfx stack, i found a jcm 900 combo 212 who wants to trade for a vox, would that be good? he says it wouldnt be loud enough for practicing but im pretty sure it would, just throwing these things out there
#8
The smallest JCM900 was 50W. If it isn't loud enough it needs new tubes.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#9
Well, if you want a Blink tone, Tom DeLonge used a JCM 800.
Those heads sound awesome, just tad bit more expensive than the 900.
And also, I'm a big Blink fan as well, and I have a Dual Rectifier for my Pop Punk band
and the tone I get out of it is awesome, sounds extremely good. But I sold an arm and a leg for it.
#10
If I had the money a recto or an 800 (2203/2204) would be my choice too. The 900 is cheap and will do the job.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#11
As far as ATL is concerned, I think Alex uses a JCM 900 live now so you might want to jump on that 2x12 900 combo ASAP. Only downside (and this applies to all 2x12 combos) is that it's going to be a pain in the ass to carry around- and wreak havoc on your back on top of that- so it definitely wouldn't be a bad idea to opt for a head and 2x12 cab instead.

Depending on your budget, a used Mesa Rectifier would also fit the bill. ATL used them in the past (well Jack did anyway (he now uses an Eleven Rack), IIRC Alex previously used a Stiletto). Tom Delonge also used them back in Blink's heyday (along with a JCM 900 which I believe was his clean amp).

A good noise gate would also help your current situation (I haven't had much experience with them, so I can't recommend any particular one).
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Last edited by rocknrolldude43 at Apr 7, 2012,
#13
i found a peavey valveking 100 head with a marshall cab who wants to trade for my vox, would that be a wise trade?
#14
Noise gates are for people who can't control their gear! Try covering the sounds holes with carboard and tape it in. I have an electro-acoustic that I sometimes amplify, and I put cardboard in the soundhole and it works great!
#15
Quote by head-case
Noise gates are for people who can't control their gear! Try covering the sounds holes with carboard and tape it in. I have an electro-acoustic that I sometimes amplify, and I put cardboard in the soundhole and it works great!


If I turned my peavey 6505 past 3, without pedals, and with the distortion moderately applied, the screeching was awful. It was like that in almost any setting with any guitar. No, noise gates are not for people who can't control their gear. They are a piece of technology that helps curb the problem I described above. Many talented musicians use them.
#16
I recently had a short involvement doing some Blink-esque stuff with a guy who used a big hollowbody and it was tough going. The guitar was just too, well, too hollowbody for that kind of music. Some of the changes were very short and quick and the guitar was too indistinct. It muddied up things a bit. Pauses were a nightmare.
Last edited by woad_yurt at Apr 9, 2012,