#1
Can you see the fretboard like a piano?

Well I can't.

[ Any tips for me? ]

Right now the technique I'm using is octave finding. The bad thing is, I tell the 2 bass strings from memory, a one-step process.. but when it comes to the other strings, I have to run in through my bass string memory, creating a 2 step process, and it's very very slow. T~T

[ give me exercises ? ]

Say notes out loud, as you play them

Music sheet reading

Say a note, find all its octaves

Form a major chord, minor chord..

Imitate simple melodies I can play in the piano

Fretboard warrior
-I don't know if this is effective, if I can wire my mind to see my guitar like the one in the screen, I however take my chances and do it everyday o-O


----

I really want to put fretboard stickers with notes on my guitar temporarily. I just don't know any material that won't ruin the wood with sticky stuff. :l
#2
I basically just keep the E and A strings memorized. And then I only think about the note name long enough to name the key I'm in. After that, I quit thinking about note names, and start thinking in scale degrees. Works good for me.
#3
Find arpeggios and triad shapes and memorize them. Play different scales... And always know what notes are playing.

Really everything you do reinforces the mental map you have of the fretboard as long as you think about what notes you're playing. Fretboard warrior does it too, though I find it boring.

Finding and memorizing different triad shapes all along the fretboard is really the best exercise I can think of.
#4
When I started, I learned the names of the open strings. Then I learned to play 'E' everywhere I could find. I learned all the different variety of octave and unison shapes. Then it was extremely simple to apply it to B, G, D and A. That's five notes down already. Then I learned where C and F were and fleshed that out.

Everything else, I just flatted or sharped it by moving down or up a fret. That's all twelve notes down pat all over the neck. Then to think of it more like a piano, I learned the shapes intervals formed. Now I can be given any scale in any key and play it instantly.

It's not like it developed overnight, though. It took plenty of practise. From octaves and unisons, I guess I moved onto perfect fifths, then perfect fourths. Then thirds, sevenths, sixths and seconds.
Ibanez RG2228 w/ EMG808Xs | Line 6 POD HD500 | Mackie HD1221
#5
Remember this. The intervals between the open strings 4,4,4,3,4 are as follows: - E to A (4). In other words, E, F#,G#,A.
A to D (4) = A, B, C#, D.
D to G (4) = D, E, F#, G.
G to B (3) = G, A, B.
B to E (4) = B, C#, D#, E.

4,4,4,3,4 so the same applies on every base note. If you start on F on the low E string, then the note on the first fret of the A string is A# which is 4 notes up from the F. And so on.
Hope this isn't too complicated. I have probably not explained it too well.
#6
To really have it down, you have to know it vertically, diagonally, horizontally, etc.. arpeggios and chords are a great way to gather chunks together.

Another thing that helps enourmously is knowing your intervals by heart.
The above poster said something along the lines,


What he meant is that you can see the strings as pianos stacked in rows separated by:

low string E-A = Perfect 4th
A-D = P4th
D-G = P4th
G-B= Maj 3
B-E = P4

(this of course would apply through the whole fretboard)

For me Fretboard Warrior, Octave finding, and many other things didnt work at all, i can play the octaves like a madman or respond to software quickly, but still be lost in a real musical situation.

Dont know why.. it just is like that to me.
Last edited by Slashiepie at Apr 21, 2012,
#7
funny... Ive been playing about 3 years now. My early music experience was with piano when I was a kid. Very usefull as I knew all the keys, understood scales, chords, modes, formation, circle of 5ths... its really helped me get a big jump on my theory.

I still think of notes in terms of black and white (keys)

Like the poster above Ive worked to memorize all the notes on the E/A strings first. Since I know all the E/A Em/Am shaped barre cords (and many of the sus, 6, 9, etc) I know what notes will sounds right.

Visualize your white keys.

On a guitar you have (basic shapes), Am, C, Dm, Em, F, G
Em, Am, Dm pentatonic scales are all white notes

That opens up some cool chord formations/voicings and opens the fretboard when playing a key.

Its less memorizing for me. If you know some piano and have a favorite key or mode its just a case of translating that into the chords and scales and you have your roadmap for notes,

Make any sense?
he of tranquil mind
#8
Macab - i need to have better grasp of intervals.. trying to work on it

Hi Dayn - i tried that.. recently.. i got a random note generator and found all octaves in my guitar. i don't feel like it helps.. i don't know what it's supposed to do..

Thank you Slash/ Kp - i do know those intervals.. i'm just not too familiar

fishmike - thank you, ..my current attempt was using chord shapes, i've abandoned memorizing scales on their on for now... this way i can find out the scale pattern/notes on my own w/o reference, really slowly though
#9
Quote by luxeion
Macab - i need to have better grasp of intervals.. trying to work on it

Hi Dayn - i tried that.. recently.. i got a random note generator and found all octaves in my guitar. i don't feel like it helps.. i don't know what it's supposed to do..

Thank you Slash/ Kp - i do know those intervals.. i'm just not too familiar

fishmike - thank you, ..my current attempt was using chord shapes, i've abandoned memorizing scales on their on for now... this way i can find out the scale pattern/notes on my own w/o reference, really slowly though
maybe you put aside learning scale(s) but dont put aside learning one scale: Pentatonic.. The why is simple, it can be used for 10000 things from solos to little simple fills you want to add to spice up your transition from one chord to another.

Also, its only one shape, thats right.... just one. Also your understanding of the piano keyboard will really help you here.

Also the minor pent and major pent scales are also the same, the only difference is the root note:
Am pent scale is A, C, D, E, G then back to A
Cmaj pent scale is C, D, E, G, A then back to C

Same scale, same shape... just different starting point.

I would really hammer home learning that shape. Its pretty begginer and you can practice it over the 1000 backtracks on youtube.

I promise it will open up the whole fretboard and lead to tons of new things in your playing and will expand your comfort zone with everything. For me I just practiced these shapes, and when I started to use them more and more and branch out into playing in other keys and chord formations that didnt involve being based around the begginer open chords this stuff was invaluable.

Thats one of the cool things... if you have a part on keyboard/piano you used to playing in C, and someone tells you you have to play it in Bb or F# or any other random key its a massive pain (it would be for me). With guitar your playing the same thing, just on a different place on the fretboard. Thats the beauty of it.

Hope that helps
he of tranquil mind
#10
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
I basically just keep the E and A strings memorized. And then I only think about the note name long enough to name the key I'm in. After that, I quit thinking about note names, and start thinking in scale degrees. Works good for me.


Pretty much what I do.

Find the root and go from there.