#1
So i just wondered, what are the recomended practice volume on guitar? I have this db meter app on my iphone that shows that my practice volume is around 70-80 db. I play several hours a day. Is this dangerous for my ears?
#2
Sorry, sonny. You'll have to speak up, I'm a bit deef.
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#3
Only if it hurts. Don't quote me on this but I believe it's about 73db 90db that minor damage could happen - can reheal.

Edit: Thanks, Google!
Last edited by DeadF18 at Apr 7, 2012,
#4
I'm 17 (18 in 1 week) and I mostly have ringing in my ears constantly although it's only noticeable if I want to hear it (if that makes sense) and only when it's really quiet (eg bed) or after I just finished playing. I have a Bugera 333xl (ie big tube amp) which is pretty loud. I'm starting to force myself to turn it down now. I haven't measured the decibels but I'd say I play pretty loud anywhere from 70-90db. The scary thing is I only play about half on the channel volume (lead channel mostly) and less than 1/3 master volume. The Db scale is logarithmic though so I doubt it I would put it over 90db. I've been playing that way for about a year now since we moved to a much bigger house.
#5
Oh, my ears arent actually ringing, but when i have played with distotion, and improvised over backing tracks in 30 min+, i can feel a sligt headace, if i move quickly to a quiet place. But it dosnt annoy me at all. My mum works in the room beside my room, and she says she can hear it, but dosnt have a problem with it.

DeadF18: How many years shuld i play with 90db+ to get minor damage? What is minor damage? I dont have a dream about having perfect hearing abillity when im 70 years+, but i dont wanna loose hearng as young (im 17), because i know that it will be even worse when im over 40, and i needd to be carefull my whole life as a musician...
#6
Quote by Usernames sucks
Oh, my ears arent actually ringing, but when i have played with distotion, and improvised over backing tracks in 30 min+, i can feel a sligt headace, if i move quickly to a quiet place. But it dosnt annoy me at all. My mum works in the room beside my room, and she says she can hear it, but dosnt have a problem with it.

DeadF18: How many years shuld i play with 90db+ to get minor damage? What is minor damage? I dont have a dream about having perfect hearing abillity when im 70 years+, but i dont wanna loose hearng as young (im 17), because i know that it will be even worse when im over 40, and i needd to be carefull my whole life as a musician...


headache? I never get headaches from my guitar but if you are definitely turn it down.
#7
Quote by metallicaftwlp
headache? I never get headaches from my guitar but if you are definitely turn it down.

Well im not sure how to say this propperly since english is not my fist language, but its not that it hurts in my head, but it is this kind of tierdness you feel after you have been running etc...
#9
I'm sat here typing with a loud ringing in my left ear from the gig I played last night; interestingly enough it's not my loud amps that hurt my ears, but rather the drummer's crash cymbal (he is on my left side, hence the left ear ringing). That said, I'm well aware my hearing is shot, what I consider 'normal' guitar tone is apparently piercingly sharp/trebly to others.
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#11
I've heard of some playing with earplugs to protect their hearing. If I ever get into a "loud" situation I'll be tempted to do that
#13
i have had ringing in my ears for the last 15-20 years from loud music guitar playing etc and my hearing still checks out fine don't get to worried unless its causing pain then turn it down and get your ears checked out
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#15
If you're just practicing by yourself, what's the point of turning the volume up so much that it hurts your ears?
Last edited by lucky1978 at Apr 7, 2012,
#16
60dB - normal conversation
120dB - threshold of pain
130dB - mugger deterrent
200dB - Saturn rocket blastoff
RG320DXQM
RG4EXQM1
S370DX
GRGA42QA
Washburn WR 150
lotus les paul copy
special 112
valveking 100 watt head
ADA MP1 & MP2
QUDRAVERB
Msp4
MORLEY BAD HORSIE WAH
RX412 Randall cab
2x12 with eminence legends
#17
This page has a really good rough guide of what different decibel levels are like.
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Last edited by PsiGuy60 at Apr 7, 2012,
#18
Yeah I used to get abused by the crash cymbal practicing with my old band. The cymbal was about 2 feet from me, and every time he bashed that thing it almost felt like he was actually hitting my eardrum. I have to have my amp REALLY loud before I get the same level of discomfort.

But 80db is about the same as a vacuum cleaner, 95 is about as loud as an orchestra, and 110 being front row at a rock concert.

The scale is not linear though. every 10db adds a factor of 10 to the volume beyond the point where you can hear a sound. so 10db is 10X louder than a noise you can faintly hear, 20db is 100X louder than that noise, and 30db is 1,000X louder, etc. So 70-80 db is actually a pretty big jump in volume.

EDIT:
Quote by from the article PsiGuy60 linked

High frequency sounds of 2-4,000 Hz are the most damaging. The uppermost octave of the piccolo is 2,048-4,096 Hz.


This is the kind of high frequency noise from cymbals I was talking about. It's actually painful after a while.
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Last edited by jpatan at Apr 7, 2012,
#19
Quote by moosejr
60dB - normal conversation
120dB - threshold of pain
130dB - mugger deterrent
200dB - Saturn rocket blastoff

210dB - Where teh toanz are at.

Dude, you have tubes for a reason; to crank them. So do it.
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#20
depends

there are listed decibel levels where damage more or less will occur, but depending on what your ears are like, the frequency etc., damage can result from lower levels

if you really care you could ask a doctor. i know i'm not a doctor.
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#21
Quote by moosejr
60dB - normal conversation
120dB - threshold of pain
130dB - mugger deterrent
200dB - Saturn rocket blastoff


don't forget the dB scale is logarithmic, so 200dB is much more than twice as loud as 100dB.

i.e.

#22
Quote by Usernames sucks
i shuld DEFINITELY use ear plugs in band practice and stuff...

Dan_5893: What does IIRC mean?


corrected
periphery/bulb!

gear:
Ibanez RG7321 w/ D-sonic in bridge

Peavey 5150 mk ii & b52 4x12 cab

line 6 podxt for recording

Quote by AsOneIStand
Head and Cab for $130? You don't need a head and cabinet, you need a psychological examination.
#23
Quote by Usernames sucks
Oh, my ears arent actually ringing, but when i have played with distotion, and improvised over backing tracks in 30 min+, i can feel a sligt headace, if i move quickly to a quiet place. But it dosnt annoy me at all. My mum works in the room beside my room, and she says she can hear it, but dosnt have a problem with it.

DeadF18: How many years shuld i play with 90db+ to get minor damage? What is minor damage? I dont have a dream about having perfect hearing abillity when im 70 years+, but i dont wanna loose hearng as young (im 17), because i know that it will be even worse when im over 40, and i needd to be carefull my whole life as a musician...


There is no set rule dude. Everybody is different. A buddy of mine has tinnitus and he claims he's never really been exposed to loud music, jets, etc. His doctor told him he got it from just having conversations with people at work (retail). I'd go see a Doctor. Your ear canal controls balance and equilibrium and shit and maybe your 'fatigue' is related to that. I'm not a doctor though.

I do recommend these though - first shipment is free.

http://www.hearos.com/earplugs/music


If I Remember Correctly
#24
Those db apps aren't exactly accurate. The ones I've tried (from Android market....or shall I say Google Play) show 90 db+ when there's absolutely no sound and hardly increase when I play anything at any volume.
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#25
If you get to my age and your hearing is still perfect you have wasted your life.

Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#26
Quote by Cathbard
If you get to my age and your hearing is still perfect you have wasted your life.




I'm not as old as you but luckily I have no ear or ringing problems. I attribute that to wearing ear plugs when I need too and not cranking the ear buds.
#27
I can't quite remember what exact symptoms are (must have seen it on Mythbusters or Richard Hammond's non-TopGear shows), but I would think pain and ear-aches are temporary while tinnitus and hearing loss are permanent - I have heard of both those disappearing after a while though.
#28
7.2 Noise exposure limits
An employer must ensure that a worker is not exposed to noise levels above either of the following exposure limits:

(a) 85 dBA Lex daily noise exposure level;

(b) 140 dBC peak sound level.

*******[Enacted by B.C. Reg. 382/2004, effective January 1, 2005.]

This is an excerpt from the regulations from the enforcement agency whose jurisdiction I live in. Basically when I work sound for local shows I am required (as well as all other venue staff) to undergo mandatory hearing tests (every 12 months) and to wear hearing protection while working. I use -24 dB earplugs that are approved. I can not exceed the 140 dBC limit at any time. I am also not allowed to exceed 115 dBA measured at 1 m from any speaker.

There is actually an CSA standard procedure for measuring these levels. It is also recommended that you have an approved SPL Meter (not a phone app) to do on the fly checks.

Of course this isn't very rock 'n roll ...
If I miss one day of practice, I notice it.
If I miss two days, the critics notice it.
If I miss three days, the audience notices it.

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#31
It's that godamn drummer that's the problem.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#32
Hey! I used to have a ringing in my ears whenever I practiced with my band on a garage. I'm 18 btw! I solve this by buying some ear plugs (already suggested). Keep in mind that, with earplugs, you can still hear the rest of the band playing, but you'll not have that ringing that troubles you. I bought ones at a local pharmacy; they are atached bye a string (both pieces) so you can have them hanged on your neck when you don't need them. Give them a try, your problems will be resolved!


One more thing, someone once told me that what it damages the ears most are the bassy sounds. It had something to do with vibration I think. Bass will make your ears vibrate. more trebbly sounds, if they get to high, you ear cuts them and you can listen (like the dog whistles). This information may not be true, I have a vague ideia of earing this.

Hope it helps!
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#33
Quote by Lespagnol3105
]

One more thing, someone once told me that what it damages the ears most are the bassy sounds. It had something to do with vibration I think. Bass will make your ears vibrate. more trebbly sounds, if they get to high, you ear cuts them and you can listen (like the dog whistles). This information may not be true, I have a vague ideia of earing this.

Hope it helps!


no, high frequencies such as cymbals, trumpets, and loud guitars do the most damage
periphery/bulb!

gear:
Ibanez RG7321 w/ D-sonic in bridge

Peavey 5150 mk ii & b52 4x12 cab

line 6 podxt for recording

Quote by AsOneIStand
Head and Cab for $130? You don't need a head and cabinet, you need a psychological examination.
#34
You don't wanna practice to the point where you think it's ruining your ears. I have a cousin who had the attitude that 'louder is better' and all that in music, he ended up with tinnitus so bad that it's apparently ruined the fun of making music at any reasonable volumes due to it acting up so easily.

Obviously he was unlucky, some people can avoid it easier but it's not worth the risk, it's up to you but it's something i'm trying to avoid as much as i can since i already have very slight tinnitus.