#1
hi guys.i have been playing guitar about 3 months.i have a classical guitar.i want to buy an electric guitar.i have learned the basic chords and now i am playing some electric guitar licks riffs.i am doing this enough good.for example i can play the purple haze intro and the rhythmic.also i have tried to learn a part of stairway to heaven solo.i can play it very well.this part ends before the reapetable bends.all i have learnt them in my classical guitar.so what i am asking is to tell me if my playing will be easier in electric guitar.
#2
Thing is, strings are closer to the board on an electric, and the strings bend nicer. To answer your question, yes it will
Quote by luxeion
i keep asking my dad for wood. but he keeps getting annoyed (he's working on a house). and i'm too young to go outside.

#3
You should get an electric guitar, it is easy to play riffs and licks in using it.
#5
i tried the electric guitar of my friend unplugged and the bending was so easy.
#6
I definitely prefer electric guitar for string bends. It's much easier.
Quote by IMTHAMAN01013
I named my guitar after my GF once... It was tempremental, the neck was too fat, and I couldn't turn down the volume, just like her...
#7
Like someone else said, Electric guitar is not easier to play, just different. The strings are closer to the fret-board, so bending and fretting will be easier to a degree. But your playing position will need slight tweaks. You won't need the foot-stool position for your leg anymore, and such things. A nice relaxed position is preferred in both styles of play, but with an electric it's VERY relaxed lol... stoner relaxed ... not advocating the use of illegal substances, just saying you REALLY have to relax to play right on this thing! lol.

Another thing to get used to is the amp and electronics side of the electric. Getting the right sound will require some effort on your part. I'd research the forums for gear and settings that most closely resembles your favorite artist's tone before buying anything. You don't want to buy a humbucker style guitar to play the classic Hendrix tunes, for example. Nor would you use the proper single coil fender through the quite improper Triple Rectified Mesa/Boogie at max volume and gain for that sound . It requires the right mix of guitar>amp/cab>effects for that "perfect" replica of the sound you'd want. Of course the higher your budget, the closer you get to the original tone usually, but not always hehe.


I don't mean to throw you off of your love of electric guitar. Just make sure to do a little research first. We will be more than able to help you find the right tone for your budget, provided you ask in the right thread and forum .
"grateful is he who plays with open fingers" - Me

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#8
Quote by Outside Octaves
You won't need the foot-stool position for your leg anymore, and such things.


I completely disagree. Keeping a "classical" sitting position ensures excellent left hand position. This position tends to be how the guitar hangs from a strap when standing, so there is no difference of hand position going from sitting to standing.
#9
The classical guitar is definitely better for you technique (fingering, accuracy, strength, etc.) but the electric guitar will open up a lot of things for you. From what I've seen, some people switching over to the electric have trouble keeping time because classical guitarists usually play alone and are not used to playing with a band.

If you are determined to start electric guitar, it will involve a lot of sitting down and just trying to figure out how to do this and that; most likely bending, vibrato, and picking at first. I play both and I have to say they are both very interesting and have their own pros and cons.

Most common problems with switching? (IMHO that is)
-Picking for sure
-Time (keeping a steady pace)
-Bending
-Vibrato
-Wrist movement (?) I've seen people have trouble with their wrists when they strum or pick; when they start to speed up the wrist gets rigid and won't be able to keep up.

If I were you, I'd wait a while before grabbing an electric. You will never regret doing classical guitar once you've learned up on all the basics of it. Either way, ALWAYS PLAY WITH A METRONOME!

A guitar is a guitar, they're not THAT different.
#10
Quote by Shornifier
The classical guitar is definitely better for you technique (fingering, accuracy, strength, etc.) but the electric guitar will open up a lot of things for you. From what I've seen, some people switching over to the electric have trouble keeping time because classical guitarists usually play alone and are not used to playing with a band.

If you are determined to start electric guitar, it will involve a lot of sitting down and just trying to figure out how to do this and that; most likely bending, vibrato, and picking at first. I play both and I have to say they are both very interesting and have their own pros and cons.

Most common problems with switching? (IMHO that is)
-Picking for sure
-Time (keeping a steady pace)
-Bending
-Vibrato
-Wrist movement (?) I've seen people have trouble with their wrists when they strum or pick; when they start to speed up the wrist gets rigid and won't be able to keep up.

If I were you, I'd wait a while before grabbing an electric. You will never regret doing classical guitar once you've learned up on all the basics of it. Either way, ALWAYS PLAY WITH A METRONOME!

A guitar is a guitar, they're not THAT different.



Can't agree with this more. Electric guitars are different to play but generally are much easier due to strings and feel etc.. But i think of it this way, the harder you make it for yourself now (ie, practising on an acoustic with high strings or a classical with a fat neck) the easier it will be when you pick it a guitar that's got low strings, thin strings and a thinner neck.
#11
My mother has a nice classical nylon string guitar. Its great and thats what I learned on to start. I joined this site in 2008, learned the open chords and that got me started. I didnt have a lot of time to practice so I put it down for a year and summer of 09 I picked up a steel string acoustic. That xmas I bought a Gibson Les Paul. Ive since picked up a nice Strat and a Fender Jazz Bass as well.

I have a baby coming very soon and I have really been itching to get back to that classical guitar and use it to "get quiet."

Anyway I mentioned the multiple guitars I have because I always go back and play the old ones, and Im convinced the variety a) improves my overall playing and b) keeps me from getting stagnant in my playing. I will plug in the Les and make it growl, but when I play that Strat I like the cleaner tones and bluesy stuff. I still play the acoustic daily also. Its all good
he of tranquil mind