#1
Some have them and some don't.

Just curious. Should you always make every attempt to write in the bridge. This seems to always be the hardest part for me but I don't have a good feel for a guideline except that it seems to throw in a personal thought or sometimes a third person.
#2
I have very few songs without bridges/interludes/long outros. I just like the breath of fresh air that a different key or sound gives you. I just find the verse, chorus, and repeat cycle a bit boring.
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#3
Don't need to. Bridge is designed to provide a break from the main section and to give lift to final chorus.

Play your song for people, if they get bored at the end of the second chorus. Add a bridge.

In terms of lyrics. It can an echo of the original idea, re-phrasing of the emotion, alternate perspective etc.

I tend to think of it.... If musical it's completely different try and keep it lyrical similar and vice verse. Helps keep everything together. Once you get that down start experimenting with more advanced versions (wildly different).
#4
I don't usually write songs in the old verse-chorus fashion. If you do though, you need something to break up the repetition. So yeah make and bridge AND a solo.
#5
Every song should be a 4 minute solo, gang vocals shouting "F UCK" and a muscle car made of hair.
Poor advice.
#6
Quote by stellar_legs
Every song should be a 4 minute solo, gang vocals shouting "F UCK" and a muscle car made of hair.




Wrong forum, TS.