#1
Whether 'tis nobler to the ears to hear
the highs and lows of outrageous decibels
or strain your back against a tonne of magnet
and by lifting, pull a muscle, to curse, to yell
no more.


Seriously though, i'm buying an amp soon. It doesn't need to be portable, in fact it will likely never move. is there any reason to get a combo amp if i don't plan on moving it ever?
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Capitalization is the difference between "I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse" and "i helped my uncle jack off the horse"
Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#2
Your argument sounds a little backwards to me. I will always recommend a head + cab when transportation is an issue. Making two trips is an infinitely better sacrifice than straining your back moving a ridiculously heavy combo.

Either way, head + combo is just better. IMO, of course, but the ability to swap cabs or heads at a whim is really nice. A combo is just a combo. You're limited with what you can do with it.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

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#3
Quote by Offworld92
Your argument sounds a little backwards to me. I will always recommend a head + cab when transportation is an issue. Making two trips is an infinitely better sacrifice than straining your back moving a ridiculously heavy combo.


good point.
.
Capitalization is the difference between "I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse" and "i helped my uncle jack off the horse"
Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#4
Quote by Offworld92
Either way, head + combo is just better. IMO, of course, but the ability to swap cabs or heads at a whim is really nice. A combo is just a combo. You're limited with what you can do with it.


did you mean to say head + cab is just better?

I like the idea of a separate amp and cab, but i mean...this is going in a studio, it will never gig, it will never have to be loud enough to fill up a noisy bar. I'm sure you can buy low powered heads, but is it worth it? with some fairly basic mods you can make any combo amp useful as either a cab or a head while retaining the ability to use it as it was designed.
.
Capitalization is the difference between "I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse" and "i helped my uncle jack off the horse"
Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#5
For studio use I think the question is less about Head + Cab, or Combo, I think it is more about what type of sound you want. Are you wanting an amp that has different types of speakers to be able to mic differently, do you want the amp to have a speaker simulated out, so on so forth.
#6
lol yeah.

If it's going into a studio, that's even more reason to get a head+cab. Eventually you're going to want to play around with different combinations.

The wattage is kind of irrelevant. Wattage is more of a rating of headroom than volume, and that should be dealt with on an amp by amp basis.

I'm not sure what you're arguing against, or if you're just playing devil's advocate. If you want a combo, get a combo. In your situation, it ultimately doesn't matter. But a head + cab is, IMO, easier to deal with and better to work with in general.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#7
Oh, i'm not arguing for or against anything, just thinking outloud....silently...with my fingers. I mostly play acoustic, but i've recently started playing electric again. I currently play through headphones hooked up to a studio pod hooked up to my computer. I've owned a few amps in the past, but none that I liked...gonna spend a fair amount of time harassing local music stores, but wanted to get some input on which style gives the nicest output.
.
Capitalization is the difference between "I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse" and "i helped my uncle jack off the horse"
Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#8
Quote by Pg.inc_music
For studio use I think the question is less about Head + Cab, or Combo, I think it is more about what type of sound you want. Are you wanting an amp that has different types of speakers to be able to mic differently, do you want the amp to have a speaker simulated out, so on so forth.


I'm not really sure how to answer that...in the end i'm looking for something that will sound nice and clean on its own, and take pedals and effects well.
.
Capitalization is the difference between "I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse" and "i helped my uncle jack off the horse"
Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#10
OK, let's cut through the bs. Most combos are open backed, that gives a different tone to a closed back cab which is what 99.9% of stacks are. If you want sloppy bass for blues then a combo is a fine choice. They have a bit more bass but that bass is loose. If you want tight bass and have plenty of room to move on the bass control of your amp then get a head/cab.
The other considerations are all bs. All decent amps are a pita to cart around. One trip or two - you'll still need a trolley if you value your back so wtf difference does it make as long as they both fit in the vehicle?
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#11
Quote by Cathbard
OK, let's cut through the bs. Most combos are open backed, that gives a different tone to a closed back cab which is what 99.9% of stacks are. If you want sloppy bass for blues then a combo is a fine choice. They have a bit more bass but that bass is loose. If you want tight bass and have plenty of room to move on the bass control of your amp then get a head/cab.
The other considerations are all bs. All decent amps are a pita to cart around. One trip or two - you'll still need a trolley if you value your back so wtf difference does it make as long as they both fit in the vehicle?


interesting insight - thank you. So if i want the most versatility, would you say a cab with a removable sealed back would be my best option?
.
Capitalization is the difference between "I helped my Uncle Jack off the horse" and "i helped my uncle jack off the horse"
Quote by stepchildusmc
either way your gonna need a big bucket... how you set it under the horse is up to you.
#12
The difference isn't really enough to warrant too much effort. Get the one that suits what you do most and it will be fine covering the rest.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#13
In all honesty if you're not really moving it that much and you don't care either way, get what sounds the best for your situation. If that happens to be a big heavy combo, get it. If you like a smaller head with a 2x12 cab, that's fine too. It really doesn't matter and Cathbird is right with regards to the fact that anything substantial and tube is going to be heavy regardless of combo or head+cab setup. At the end of the day, I'd probably go with a head+cab just for the sake of the fact that you are in a studio and the ability to switch out cabs with your head is a cool option but, by all means, if you find a combo that sounds better, go for it. Trust me, I'm pretty sure I have the heaviest combo on earth (~90lb 5150 Combo) and it's really not that bad to move around with either another person or a good trolly which you'd probably want anyway.
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Last edited by Krauser at Apr 9, 2012,
#14
Consider price and space too.
A half stack will be more expensive the a comparable combo when all is said and done.
Also, a half stack will take up more space...but that space is mosly vertical. You will probably save a little footprint space w/a combo, but that savings will be minimal.
#15
I prefer combos. More convenient and none of the ones I've considered weigh more than 50 pounds. The don't take much space, you don't have to connect a cab to the head (because it's already done), and very portable.
#16
It doesn't really seem to matter. The only real upside being brought up about a head/cab is the ability to change cabs. Last I checked, most combos have an external speaker jack. If the favorite amp you find is a combo get it, if it's a head/cab get that. Whatever sounds the best is the best.
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#17
Quote by tas38
It doesn't really seem to matter. The only real upside being brought up about a head/cab is the ability to change cabs. Last I checked, most combos have an external speaker jack. If the favorite amp you find is a combo get it, if it's a head/cab get that. Whatever sounds the best is the best.


Well, Combos are usually atleast half the wattage as their flagships. If you like the sound of a head, doesn't mean you'll necessarily get that sound with the combo.
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If you're just playing at home or with friends, do it dude. Chicks dig stacks! Crank out some Metallica and do a couple of single moms!

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#18
that opens your possibilities because you can get away with micing up even a small 5-10 watt boutique amp.

however, if you can get the same thing in a head, not only is it portable, but you can hook it up into the many cabs that your studio probably has. instead of getting 1 tone, you can potentially get unlimited.

plus, do you own the studio or are you a guitarist who is buying the amp? it is ALWAYS useful to be able to move your amp. wat if you stop recording? what if you decide its better suited at home? then an apartment? then .... i dunno.
#19
Also, another thing I just thought of..

With open back cabs (usually found on combos) you can double mic it. One mic in the usual spot on the front, with another SM57 (Or similar) few inches from the back, to get a thicker sound.

I've done it a few times, it worked really well once, others it was relatively obsolete.

But that's another thing to consider for Open back cab/combo.
Blackstar HT-5 mini-stack
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Quote by lucky1978
If you're just playing at home or with friends, do it dude. Chicks dig stacks! Crank out some Metallica and do a couple of single moms!

I ask many questions.
#20
It really depends on what you want in terms of sound.
If the sound you like comes from a combo, get that combo.
If it comes from a head + cabinet, get that head and a similar cabinet (same speakers, mostly).

However, don't get anything too loud. As previously stated, you can get away with mic'ing a boutique 5 watt amp. A halfstack is pretty much guaranteed overkill, though a 2×12 cabinet and head is fair game.

PS. Most combos worth their money have an external speaker jack, so if you like how a combo sounds but want to experiment you can still hook it up to a cabinet.
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Last edited by PsiGuy60 at Apr 10, 2012,