#1
What have been your best expieriances, with which Y-Boxes? I've heard good things about the ABY Mix by Morley. A very common complaint with Splitters is that they supposedly suck tone, which splitters have not given you that probem? Or, do you think it's best to just use Y-Cables instead?
#2
A proper, basic A/B/Y is just two DPDT switches in a box. There's nothing there to suck tone, so in theory as long as a decent switch and jack is used, they should all be the same product. Places like Loop-master make decent stuff at a reasonable price. If there's any tone suck it's coming from the interaction of the things you're plugging into, not the ABY itself. What are you using the ABY for?
http://www.loop-master.com/

The Morley is something completely different. It's got some active circuitry and a whole lot of stuff you may or may not need. If you really want to blend signals, that's the way to do it, but if you're just selecting amps or pedal chains, it's a waste of money and it's probably going to mess with your tone.

Alternatively, you can just make your own. All it takes is a soldering iron and a screwdriver.
#3
RadioShack and 2O bucks- make your own. No tone suck and no noise.

If you google ABY it will probably link to a schematic that was put up by Cathbard. I used his schematic and built two. One for myself and one for my brother. No noise even during switching, my brother uses it in his home studio. No tone alteration.

Here is the link:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1505304
Last edited by R45VT at Apr 9, 2012,
#4
Quote by Roc8995
A proper, basic A/B/Y is just two DPDT switches in a box. There's nothing there to suck tone, so in theory as long as a decent switch and jack is used, they should all be the same product. Places like Loop-master make decent stuff at a reasonable price. If there's any tone suck it's coming from the interaction of the things you're plugging into, not the ABY itself. What are you using the ABY for?
http://www.loop-master.com/

The Morley is something completely different. It's got some active circuitry and a whole lot of stuff you may or may not need. If you really want to blend signals, that's the way to do it, but if you're just selecting amps or pedal chains, it's a waste of money and it's probably going to mess with your tone.

Alternatively, you can just make your own. All it takes is a soldering iron and a screwdriver.


Thanks for the reply!

Honestly, I'm not sure. I just know, for my purposes, it could come in handy very very often. Well, one usage of them being; Splitting the signal probably after the distortion in my pedal chain, and then creating an entirely new chain with effects such as an octave, reverb, and probably a few other subtle effects. The reasoning behind this is, I want to split my signal into two seperate amps, however, I don't want the effects in my usual chain (Directed to the first amp) colouring the signal directed into the second amp, and vice versa.

If that was an awful explanation, let me conjure up an example.
So, I have my regular pedal chain, with the Y-Box box splitting the signal at the distortion, right? And then that new chain from the Y-Box would contain it's own effects as mentioned earlier.. Let's say this second chain was directed to an amp prioritised for extra ambiance, whereas the first chain was directed to my usual amp. I'd like the ambiant amp to be distguishable, and not always coloured by effects I'd often use in the original chain. And also to remain consistant in it's effects and tone.

Hope that made sense, but basically, yes, that's the idea. (don't take the effects referenced too seriously, still planning it out.)