How would you go about removing pick noise from an acoustic track in pro tools?

#1
I have an acoustic track and noticed that every so often you can hear my pick hitting the pickguard or lower on the guitar, is there anyway to process that out? i have the izotope rx 2 noise r removal but im not sure how to single out certain noises.
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#2
Use a graphic eq to find the frequencies where the pick noise cuts through the most and then cut it out

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#3
If it's that prominent no external processing will effectively remove the noise, and will almost certainly be at detriment to the quality of the recording as a whole.

Your best bet is to re-record, moving the microphone until you find a sweeter position.
#4
Quote by Aaron!!
If it's that prominent no external processing will effectively remove the noise, and will almost certainly be at detriment to the quality of the recording as a whole.

Your best bet is to re-record, moving the microphone until you find a sweeter position.


This exactly
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#5
You can only get so far with a crappy performance, like Aaron said do it again, and get it right at the source. Then you won't have to ruin the sound with post processing.
#6
As said, you won't be able to entirely remove it very effectively... forensic audiologists might be able to remove it with some high-end spectral noise removal tools (CEDAR etc.) but that would cost a lot of money. If you really can't re-record, and just want to make it less-noticeable, your best bet would be a de-esser rather than surgical EQ.

Just set the de-esser up to act very high up (at least 8kHz or higher) and mess around with the sensitivty in monitor mode (so you can only hear what the de-esser is triggered by) until you're only clamping down when the pick attack is prominent. Then adjust the amount of reduction to a level that isn't too noticeable but removes enough pick attack.
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#7
Re-Record it and mic it up differently. Gonna be the best way tbh.
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#8
I agree. No reason to post process. Just re-record!

...but if you DID need to (like say this was a lost recording of Kurt Cobain the day he died) then I would suggest the following:

Look for the places in the waveform where the pick noise occurs and massage them out in the waveform editor. It's a lot of work, but as I said if you were working with the flawed apartment recordings of a dead legend or something it might be worth this Herculean effort.

#9
Some EQ could help you out, but like everyone's said, you can only do so much... Been through those hoops before.
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#10
Fix it with mic placement first, then try EQ. "Fixing it in the mix" is the worst term to ever use while recording
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#11
Fixing pic attack with EQ is just as bad as fixing it in the mix because either way you are removing a big freq spectrum that is needed for tone as that is where the pic sound usually is (at least for me its in upper mids usually).

The only real answer is adjust your playing technique, sometimes micing different will help though. I usually don't play notes higher than the 12th fret because my pic attack sounds horrid around 15th fret and higher on all strings.
Last edited by FireHawk at Apr 9, 2012,