#1
So ive been playing guitar for a little bit now and i want to start to learn theory. I know absolutely nothing now. What are some of the best sources to learn from? Also do i need to learn the notes on my fretboard before i learn theory?
#2
Learning theory will benefit you in many ways but you will have a heard time applying it without knowing the fretboard. You should learn both a the same time. It is better to divide your time ti learn multiple things than to try to master a single aspect before moving on.
#3
learn both.

musictheory.net is a great place to learn. it also has a fretboard learner in the exercises.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#5
get a private teacher
Fender Strat Deluxe
Fender MexiStrat
Epiphone Sheritan
Ibanez Artcore
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Roland JC120
Pedals

Quote by CaptainAmerican
I would recommend the marshal MG100

Very versatile and quality sound. It should treat you well
#6
Quote by Slash'sProtege
So ive been playing guitar for a little bit now and i want to start to learn theory. I know absolutely nothing now. What are some of the best sources to learn from? Also do i need to learn the notes on my fretboard before i learn theory?



Knowing absolutely nothing is a great place to start before you start getting screwed up by a lot of confusing self-taught mistakes.

As for the best, if you don't have a private instructor, and you're looking to learn things such that you can fully use them in real time, and you're willing to dig in and commit to it, maybe our Academy in the link below can help. And yes we do require the Notes on the Neck to be learned, before we accept any students. How else are you going to be able to apply what you've learned.? If I said, hey play and write the notes of a G in 2nd inv on the 543 strings, wouldn't you want to be able to do that instantly?

By the way, we teach Notes on the Neck, so, if you've never learned them before, I wouldn't worry; we teach that as well, so that as you enter into the Academy, you're more than prepared to apply what you've learned/and will learn.

Best,

Sean